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J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2000 Mar;30(3):310-3.

Risk of inadequate bone mineralization in diseases involving long-term suppression of dairy products.

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  • 1Unit of Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Hospital Materno-Infantil Vall d'Hebron, Autonomous University, Barcelona, Spain.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Eighty percent of peak bone mass should be achieved from birth through adolescence. An adequate calcium intake is essential, and it is advisable that 60% of the recommended calcium allowance be dairy calcium. This study was conducted to examine bone mineral content (BMC) in patients with diseases that usually involve long-term suppression of dairy products.

METHODS:

Thirty patients, aged 2 to 14 years (mean, 7 years), 10 with late-onset, genetically induced lactose intolerance, 7 with cow's milk protein allergy, 3 with short-bowel syndrome, and 10 with hypercholesterolemia were involved in the study. They were receiving various dietary regimens for periods longer than 2 years: 14 patients received special formulas for children (lactose-free cow's milk formula, highly hydrolyzed cow's milk protein formula, soy protein isolate formula), 4 patients received liquid soy beverages, 6 patients received skim milk (1% fat), and 6 patients had exclusion of dairy products. Bone mineral density (BMD) was assessed by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry.

RESULTS:

Nine patients had osteoporosis, 6 had osteopenia, and 15 had results within normal ranges. Overall, the group had a standard deviation score of -1.3 (osteopenia). The statistical correlation between the BMD value and the percentage intake of recommended daily allowance (RDA) of dairy (or substitute) calcium (in milligrams per day) was highly significant (P < 0.0001, r = 0.89).

CONCLUSIONS:

All patients with diseases involving total or partial withdrawal from milk products for a prolonged period are a group at potential risk of defective bone mineralization and should be monitored through BMD assessment.

PMID:
10749417
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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