Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Theriogenology. 1998 Sep;50(4):559-73.

Bacteriology of preserved stallion semen and antibiotics in semen extenders.

Author information

  • 1Department of Large Animal Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Texas A&M University, College Station 77843-4475, USA.

Abstract

Three experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of different antibiotics in a milk-glucose semen extender on motility of equine sperm and elimination of bacteria following storage of extended semen in vitro. In Experiment 1, 7 antibiotics were compared: amikacin, gentamicin, streptomycin, potassium penicillin, sodium penicillin, ticarcillin, and polymixin B. In Experiment 2, 3 antibiotic treatments were compared: potassium penicillin G, amikacin, or a combination of potassium penicillin G and amikacin. In Experiment 3, 3 antibiotic treatments were compared: potassium penicillin G-amikacin, ceptiofur, and a combination of ticarcillin and clavulanic acid (Timentin). Control treatments (antibiotic-free extender) were included in each experiment. Six motility variables were evaluated: percentage of motile sperm; percentage of progressively-motile sperm; percentage of rapidly-motile sperm; mean curvilinear velocity; mean average path velocity; and mean straight-line velocity. In Experiment 1, mean percentages of motile, progressively motile and rapidly motile sperm were lower (P < 0.05) in semen exposed to polymixin B then in other treatments. Mean average-path velocity of sperm in extender containing polymixin B was lower (P < 0.05) than that of all other treatments, with exception of control or ticarcillin. Mean straight-line velocity of sperm in extender containing polymixin B was lower (P < 0.05) than that of all other treatments, with exception of control, streptomycin or ticarcillin. Semen samples containing gentamicin, amikacin, streptomycin, or potassium penicillin were more effective (P < 0.05) at eliminating bacterial growth than those samples containing polymixin B. Semen samples containing gentamicin were also more effective (P < 0.05) at eliminating bacterial growth than those samples containing ticarcillin or sodium penicillin. In Experiment 2, mean percentage of rapidly-motile sperm, and mean curvilinear, average-path, and straight-line velocities were greater (P < 0.05) for potassium penicillin-amikacin than values for all other treatments. In 2 of 3 stallions, an effect of treatment on percentage of motile sperm was detected (P < 0.05). For one stallion, mean motility of potassium penicillin-amikacin was greater (P < 0.05) than that of all other treatment groups. For another stallion, mean motility of the control was lower (P < 0.05) than that of the other treatments. Following storage, potassium penicillin (16/18 [89%]) or potassium penicillin-amikacin (17/19 [94%]) were more effective (P < 0.05) at controlling aerobic and anaerobic bacterial isolates in semen specimens than was amikacin (10/18 [56%]). In Experiment 3, a difference among treatment groups for motility variables was not detected (P < 0.05). No bacterial growth was recovered in antibiotic-treated semen, with exception of Micrococcus sp. (2 colonies) which were isolated from one semen specimen treated with ceptiofur.

PMID:
10732147
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk