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Brain Res. 2000 Mar 6;858(1):92-105.

Comparative study of fluoxetine, sibutramine, sertraline and dexfenfluramine on the morphology of serotonergic nerve terminals using serotonin immunohistochemistry.

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  • 1Department of Biochemistry, Molecular Pharmacology and Anesthesiology, Jefferson Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA. mkalia@msn.com

Abstract

We compared the effects of treatment with high doses of fluoxetine, sibutramine, sertraline, and dexfenfluramine for 4 days on brain serotonergic nerve terminals in rats. Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) and 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine (5,7-DHT) were used as positive controls because both compounds deplete brain serotonin. Food intake and body weight changes were also monitored and yoked, pair-fed animals were used to control for possible changes in morphology due to nutritional deficits. Fluoxetine, sibutramine, sertraline and dexfenfluramine all produced a significant reduction in body weight. Fluoxetine, sibutramine and sertraline treatment resulted in no depletion of brain serotonin but produced morphological abnormalities in the serotonergic immunoreactive nerve network. In contrast, dexfenfluramine and MDMA depleted brain serotonin and produced morphological changes in the serotonin nerve network. These results indicate that even though fluoxetine, sibutramine and sertraline do not deplete brain serotonin, they do produce morphological changes in several brain regions (as identified by serotonin immunohistochemistry). Dexfenfluramine and MDMA, on the other hand, markedly deplete brain serotonin and also produce morphological changes. Collectively, these results lend support to the concept that all compounds acting on brain serotonin systems, whether capable of producing serotonin depletion or not, could produce similar effects on the morphology of cerebral serotonin systems.

PMID:
10700602
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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