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Cancer. 2000 Mar 1;88(5):988-95.

A phase I/II study of external beam radiation, brachytherapy, and concurrent chemotherapy for patients with localized carcinoma of the esophagus (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Study 9207): final report.

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  • 1University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver, CO 80262, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

A multiinstitutional, prospective study of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) was designed to determine the feasibility and toxicity of chemotherapy, external beam radiation, and esophageal brachytherapy (EB) in a potentially curable group of patients with adenocarcinoma or squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus. A preliminary analysis indicated a 17% 1-year actuarial risk of treatment-related fistulas. A final analysis of this study was considered important to determine the median survival time, local control, and late toxicity associated with this treatment regimen.

METHODS:

Planned treatment was 50 grays (Gy) of external beam radiation (25 fractions given over 5 weeks) followed 2 weeks later by EB (either high-dose-rate 5 Gy during Weeks 8, 9, and 10, for a total of 15 Gy, or low-dose-rate 20 Gy during Week 8). Chemotherapy was given during Weeks 1, 5, 8, and 11, with cisplatin 75 mg/m(2) and 5-fluorouracil 1000 mg/m(2)/24 hours in a 96-hour infusion.

RESULTS:

Of the 49 eligible patients, 45 (92%) had squamous histology and 4 (6%) had adenocarcinoma. Forty-seven patients (96%) completed external beam radiation plus at least 2 courses of chemotherapy, whereas 34 patients (69%) were able to complete external beam radiation, EB, and at least 2 courses of chemotherapy. The estimated survival rate at 12 months was 49%, with an estimated median survival of 11 months. Life-threatening toxicity or treatment-related death occurred in 12 (24%) and 5 (10%) cases, respectively. Treatment-related esophageal fistulas occurred in 6 cases (12% overall, 14% of patients starting EB) at 0.5-6.2 months from the first day of brachytherapy, leading to death in 3 cases.

CONCLUSIONS:

In this study, severe toxicity, including treatment-related fistulas, occurred within 7 months of brachytherapy. Based on the 12% incidence of fistulas, the authors continue to urge caution in employing EB, particularly when used in conjunction with chemotherapy.

Copyright 2000 American Cancer Society.

PMID:
10699886
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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