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Eur J Orthod. 1999 Dec;21(6):633-48.

Determination of the centre of resistance in an upper human canine and idealized tooth model.

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  • 1Poliklinik für Kieferorthopädie, Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität, Bonn, Germany.

Abstract

The purpose of this investigation was to analyse the influence of geometric and material parameters of a human canine on initial tooth mobility, and the stress and strain profiles in the periodontal ligament. While the material parameters of tooth and bony structures are known within an uncertain limit of approximately a factor of 10, values reported for the elasticity parameters of the periodontal ligament differ significantly. In the course of this study, bilinear behaviour was assumed for the mechanical property of the periodontium. The finite element model of an elliptical paraboloid was created as an approximation to the geometry of a human canine to reduce calculation time and to determine influences of the geometry on numerical results. The results were compared with those obtained for a realistic human canine model. The root length of both models was 19.5 mm. By calculating pure rotational and pure tipping movements, the centre of resistance (CR) was determined for both models. They were located on the long axis of the tooth approximately 7.2 mm below the alveolar crest for the idealized model and 8.2 mm for the canine model. Thus, the centre of resistance of a human canine seems to be located around two-fifths of the root length from the alveolar margin. Using these results, uncontrolled tipping (1 N of mesializing force and 5 Nmm of derotating momentum), as well as pure translation (additionally about 10 Nmm of uprighting momentum) were calculated. Comparing the idealized and the realistic models, the uncontrolled tipping was described by the parabolic-shaped model within an accuracy limit of 10 per cent as compared with the canine model, whereas the results for bodily movement differed significantly showing that it is very difficult to achieve a pure translation with the realistic canine model.

PMID:
10665193
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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