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J Am Coll Health. 2000 Jan;48(4):158-63.

The longitudinal effects of a rape-prevention program on fraternity men's attitudes, behavioral intent, and behavior.

Author information

  • University of Virginia, Charlottesville, USA. Foubert@Virginia.edu

Abstract

Rape myth acceptance, likelihood of raping, and sexually coercive behavior of 145 fraternity men randomly assigned to a control group or a rape-prevention program were surveyed. One third of 23 fraternities on a mid-Atlantic public university campus volunteered to participate in the study. The rape-prevention intervention consisted of "the men's program," a victim empathy-based presentation titled "How to help a sexual assault survivor: What men can do." Although no evidence of change in sexually coercive behavior was found, significant 7-month declines in rape myth acceptance and the likelihood of committing rape were shown among program participants. In the case of rape myth acceptance, the 7-month decrement remained lower in the participant group than in the control group. Implications of using these initial findings from the men's program for rape-prevention programming are discussed.

PMID:
10650733
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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