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J Clin Invest. 2000 Jan;105(2):233-9.

Deficiency of dolichol-phosphate-mannose synthase-1 causes congenital disorder of glycosylation type Ie.

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  • 1Institute of Physiology, University of Zurich, 8057 Zurich, Switzerland.

Abstract

Congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG), formerly known as carbohydrate-deficient glycoprotein syndromes, lead to diseases with variable clinical pictures. We report the delineation of a novel type of CDG identified in 2 children presenting with severe developmental delay, seizures, and dysmorphic features. We detected hypoglycosylation on serum transferrin and cerebrospinal fluid beta-trace protein. Lipid-linked oligosaccharides in the endoplasmic reticulum of patient fibroblasts showed an accumulation of the dolichyl pyrophosphate Man(5)GlcNAc(2) structure, compatible with the reduced dolichol-phosphate-mannose synthase (DolP-Man synthase) activity detected in these patients. Accordingly, 2 mutant alleles of the DolP-Man synthase DPM1 gene, 1 with a 274C>G transversion, the other with a 628delC deletion, were detected in both siblings. Complementation analysis using DPM1-null murine Thy1-deficient cells confirmed the detrimental effect of both mutations on the enzymatic activity. Furthermore, mannose supplementation failed to improve the glycosylation status of DPM1-deficient fibroblast cells, thus precluding a possible therapeutic application of mannose in the patients. Because DPM1 deficiency, like other subtypes of CDG-I, impairs the assembly of N-glycans, this novel glycosylation defect was named CDG-Ie.

Comment in

PMID:
10642602
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC377434
Free PMC Article

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