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Science. 2000 Jan 21;287(5452):443-9.

Emerging infectious diseases of wildlife--threats to biodiversity and human health.

Author information

  • 1Institute of Ecology, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, USA. daszak@uga.edu

Erratum in

  • Science 2000 Mar 10;287(5459):1756.

Abstract

Emerging infectious diseases (EIDs) of free-living wild animals can be classified into three major groups on the basis of key epizootiological criteria: (i) EIDs associated with "spill-over" from domestic animals to wildlife populations living in proximity; (ii) EIDs related directly to human intervention, via host or parasite translocations; and (iii) EIDs with no overt human or domestic animal involvement. These phenomena have two major biological implications: first, many wildlife species are reservoirs of pathogens that threaten domestic animal and human health; second, wildlife EIDs pose a substantial threat to the conservation of global biodiversity.

Comment in

  • Conservation conundrum. [Science. 2000]
PMID:
10642539
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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