Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Med Care. 2000 Jan;38(1):58-69.

Prevalence and predictors of unmet need for supportive services among HIV-infected persons: impact of case management.

Author information

  • 1Department of Public Health, San Francisco, California, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Previous research has indicated that the needs of persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) for supportive services often go unmet. Although case management has been advocated as a method of decreasing unmet needs for supportive services, its effectiveness is poorly understood.

OBJECTIVES:

To assess the prevalence of need and unmet need for supportive services and the impact of case managers on unmet need among HIV-infected persons.

RESEARCH DESIGN:

National probability sample.

PARTICIPANTS:

A total of 2,832 HIV-infected adults receiving care.

MEASURES:

Need and unmet need for benefits advocacy, housing, home health, emotional counseling, and substance abuse treatment services.

RESULTS:

Sixty-seven percent of the sample had a need for at least one supportive service, and 26.6% had an unmet need for at least one service in the previous 6 months. Contingent unmet need (unmet need among persons who needed the service) was greatest for benefits advocacy (34.6%) and substance abuse treatment (27.6%). Fifty-seven percent of the sample had had contact with their case manager in the previous 6 months. In multiple logistic regression analysis, with adjustment for covariates, having a case manager was associated with decreased unmet need for home healthcare (OR =0.39; 95% CI = 0.25-0.60), emotional counseling (OR = 0.54; 95% CI = 0.38-0.78), and any unmet need (OR = 0.70; 95% CI = 0.54-0.91). An increased number of contacts with a case manager was significantly associated with lower unmet need for home health care, emotional counseling, and any unmet need.

CONCLUSIONS:

Need and unmet need for supportive services among HIV-infected persons is high. Case management programs appear to lower unmet need for supportive services.

PMID:
10630720
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk