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J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 1999 Nov;54(11):B492-501.

Growth curves and survival characteristics of the animals used in the Biomarkers of Aging Program.

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  • 1Division of Biometry and Risk Assessment, National Center for Toxicological Research, Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, Arkansas 72079-9502, USA. aturturro@nctr.fda.gov

Abstract

The collaborative Interagency Agreement between the National Center for Toxicological Research (NCTR) and the National Institute on Aging (NIA) was aimed at identifying and validating a panel of biomarkers of aging in rodents in order to rapidly test the efficacy and safety of interventions designed to slow aging. Another aim was to provide a basis for developing biomarkers of aging in humans, using the assumption that biomarkers that were useful across different genotypes and species were sensitive to fundamental processes that would extrapolate to humans. Caloric restriction (CR), the only intervention that consistently extends both mean and maximal life span in a variety of species, was used to provide a model with extended life span. C57BI/6NNia, DBA/2JNia, B6D2F1, and B6C3F1 mice and Brown Norway (BN/RijNia), Fischer (F344/NNia) and Fischer x Brown Norway hybrid (F344 x BN F1) rats were bred and maintained on study. NCTR generated data from over 60,000 individually housed animals of the seven different genotypes and both sexes, approximately half ad libitum (AL) fed, the remainder CR. Approximately half the animals were shipped to offsite NIA investigators internationally, with the majority of the remainder maintained at NCTR until they died. The collaboration supplied a choice of healthy, long-lived rodent models to investigators, while allowing for the development of some of the most definitive information on life span, food consumption, and growth characteristics in these genotypes under diverse feeding paradigms.

PMID:
10619312
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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