Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Curr Biol. 1999 Dec 16-30;9(24):1458-67.

Phosphatidylinositol polyphosphate binding to the mammalian septin H5 is modulated by GTP.

Author information

  • 1Program in Cell Biology, Department of Biochemistry, Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto, M5G 1X8, Canada.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Septins are members of a conserved family of GTPases found in organisms as diverse as budding yeast and mammals. In budding yeast, septins form hetero-oligomeric filaments that lie adjacent to the membrane at the mother-bud neck, whereas in mammals, they concentrate at the cleavage furrow of mitotic cells; in both cases, septins provide a required function for cytokinesis. What directs the location and determines the stability of septin filaments, however, remains unknown.

RESULTS:

Here we show that the mammalian septin H5 is associated with the plasma membrane and specifically binds the phospholipids phosphatidylinositol 4, 5-bisphosphate (PtdIns(4,5)P(2)) and phosphatidylinositol 3,4, 5-trisphosphate (PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3)). Deletion analysis revealed that this binding occurs at a site rich in basic residues that is conserved in most septins and is located adjacent to the GTP-binding motif. Phosphoinositide binding was inhibited by mutations within this motif and was also blocked by agents known to associate with PtdInsP(2) or by a peptide corresponding to the predicted PtdInsP(2)-binding sequence of H5. GTP binding and hydrolysis by H5 significantly reduced its PtdInsP(2)-binding capability. Treatment of cells with agents that occluded, dephosphorylated or degraded PtdInsP(2) altered the appearance and localization of H5.

CONCLUSIONS:

These results indicate that the interaction of septins with PtdInsP(2) might be an important cellular mechanism for the spatial and temporal control of septin accumulation.

PMID:
10607590
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk