Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Womens Health Gend Based Med. 1999 Sep;8(7):941-7.

Patient preference for the management of mildly abnormal Papanicolaou smears.

Author information

  • 1Department of Psychology, University of Nevada, Las Vegas 89154-5030, USA.

Abstract

Our objective was to investigate patient knowledge, desire for participation in medical decision making, and preference for the management of mildly abnormal Papanicolaou (Pap) smears (low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions [LGSIL]) in the context of the continuing controversy between active (immediate colposcopy and biopsy) and surveillance (repeat Pap smears) management strategies. One hundred thirty-six women referred for a diagnostic colposcopy with a first-time mildly abnormal Pap smear result completed questionnaires before contact with either the nurse or physician. They were given the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, the CESD Depression scale, and a knowledge about dysplasia quiz. They were then presented with the two management options and asked to state a preference, if any. They then completed the Problem Solving-Decision Making Scale, a measure of desire for involvement in medical decision making. The majority of women in this sample opted for the active management strategy. Management preference was related to anxiety, with the most anxious women more likely to choose the active management strategy. Management preference was not related to knowledge or to desire for an active role in decision making, although the more knowledgeable women also reported a desire for an active role in the decision-making process. Given the current controversy over the management of mildly abnormal Pap smears (LGSIL), as well as the fact that there is no conclusive evidence to support one strategy over another, the informed management preference of women affected by these decisions should be factored into the equation.

PMID:
10534296
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk