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J Public Health Med. 1999 Sep;21(3):249-50.

Hip fracture in Hong Kong over the last decade--a comparison with the UK.

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  • 1Department of Community and Family Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, N.T.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Hip fracture is a major public health problem in Asia and the UK. The objectives of this study were to describe the trends of hip fracture in Hong Kong over the last decade, and to compare the incidence in Hong Kong with that from the Wessex Health Region of the UK in 1995.

METHODS:

The number of hip fractures was calculated using hospital discharge records for all public hospitals in Hong Kong in 1991 and 1995. Age-specific incidence rates were then calculated using the mid-year census population for the two years. These rates were presented with previously reported age-specific rates for Hong Kong in 1966 and 1985. These age-specific rates for Hong Kong in 1995 were compared with rates for the Wessex Health Region of the UK. The total number of hip fracture expected in 2010 was calculated by applying the age-specific rates of 1995 to the projected population for 2010.

RESULTS:

In 1995, a total of 1138 men and 2782 women in Hong Kong fractured their hip. The age-specific rates had remained static from 1985 to 1995, after substantial rise from 1966 to 1985. In 1995, the rates of hip fracture rates were 11/1000 in women and 5/1000 in men who were 70 years and older. These rates were almost identical to those observed in the Wessex Health Region of the UK.

CONCLUSION:

The age-specific incidence rates of hip fracture had not risen in Hong Kong in the last decade. The incidence of hip fracture in Hong Kong was similar to that in the UK in 1995. The total number of patients with hip fracture in Hong Kong will increase substantially in the future, as a result of the ageing of the population.

PMID:
10528950
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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