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Am J Prev Med. 1999 Aug;17(2):120-6.

Correlates of objectively measured physical activity in preadolescent youth.

Author information

  • 1Department of Exercise Science, School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia 29208-5323, USA. strost@sph.sc.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The purpose of this study was to identify the psychosocial and environmental correlates of objectively measured physical activity behavior in a diverse sample of sixth-grade students.

DESIGN:

Cross-sectional.

PARTICIPANTS AND SETTINGS:

One hundred ninety-eight sixth-grade students from 4 public middle schools in Columbia, South Carolina. The study group was 52.0% female, 55.1% African-American, with a mean age of 11.4 +/- 0.6 years.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Time spent in moderate physical activity (MPA) and vigorous physical activity (VPA) was assessed using a uniaxial accelerometer (CSA WAM 7164) (Computer Science and Applications Inc., Shalimar, FL). Determinant variables included: age, gender, race/ethnicity (demographic); physical activity self-efficacy, social norms related to physical activity, and beliefs regarding physical activity outcomes (psychosocial); and perceived physical activity habits of parents and peers, involvement in community physical activity organizations, involvement in community-based sports programs, access to fitness/sporting equipment at home, and self-reported hours spent watching television or playing video games (environmental).

RESULTS:

For boys, physical activity self-efficacy, social norms related to physical activity, and involvement in community physical activity organizations were salient predictors of MPA and VPA. Among girls, only physical activity self-efficacy emerged as a clear predictor of objectively measured physical activity.

CONCLUSIONS:

These findings are consistent with previous studies using self-reported physical activity and suggest that interventions to increase physical activity in preadolescent youth should endeavor to boost physical activity self-efficacy by offering a wide selection of enjoyable, developmentally-appropriate physical activity options.

PMID:
10490054
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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