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Bone Marrow Transplant. 1999 Sep;24(5):497-503.

Abnormal cytogenetics predict poor survival after high-dose therapy and autologous blood cell transplantation in multiple myeloma.

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  • 1Division of Hematology and Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic and Mayo Foundation, Rochester, MN 55905, USA.

Abstract

We compared the prognostic value of conventional cytogenetic analysis and established factors such as beta2-microglobulin and plasma cell labeling index in 70 patients undergoing autologous blood cell transplantation for multiple myeloma. Patients underwent transplantation 5 to 88 months (median, 20 months) after the initial diagnosis of myeloma. Factors studied were age, sex, beta2-microglobulin, response to prior therapy, plasma cell labeling index, cytogenetic analysis, bone marrow plasma cell percentage, lactate dehydrogenase and C-reactive protein. Twenty-eight of 65 patients (43%) had abnormal marrow cytogenetics. Overall survival measured from transplantation was significantly better in patients with normal cytogenetics than in those with abnormal cytogenetics (median survival, 25 vs 12 months, P = 0.003). Progression-free survival was better, with median times of 12 vs7 months, respectively (P = 0.005); overall survival measured from the time myeloma was first diagnosed was also longer, with median survivals of 62 and 39 months, respectively (P = 0.001). Median plasma cell labeling index was 1.5% in patients with abnormal cytogenetics and 0. 2% in those with normal cytogenetics (P < 0.001). Abnormal bone marrow cytogenetics predict poor survival after blood cell transplantation for myeloma. There is a significant correlation between abnormal cytogenetics and high plasma cell labeling index, suggesting that certain cytogenetic abnormalities may offer a proliferative advantage to myeloma cells.

PMID:
10482933
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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