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J Bone Miner Res. 1999 Sep;14(9):1596-604.

Trabecular bone turnover and bone marrow cell development in tail-suspended mice.

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  • 1Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyushu, Japan.

Abstract

To clarify the relationship between the changes of trabecular bone turnover and bone marrow cell development during mechanical unloading and reloading, we performed experiments with tail-suspended mice. At 8 weeks of age, 150 male ddY mice were divided into three body weight-matched groups. Mice of group 1 were euthanized at the start of tail suspension (day 0) as a baseline control. The mice of group 2 were subjected to hindlimb unloading by tail suspension for 14 days and reloading for the subsequent 14 days. The mice of group 3 were normally loaded as age-matched controls. Mice of groups 2 and 3 were sacrificed at 7, 14, and 28 days after the start of the experiment. In the first experiment (histomorphometric study of tibiae), unloading for 7 and 14 days and reloading for the subsequent 14 days significantly decreased the bone volume compared with that in the age-matched controls, respectively. Unloading for 7 and 14 days also significantly reduced the bone formation rate (BFR/BS), respectively, but reloading for the subsequent 14 days restored BFR/BS to the control level. While the unloading for 7 and 14 days significantly increased both the osteoclast surface (Oc.S/BS) and the osteoclast number (Oc.N/BS), the reloading for the subsequent 14 days decreased Oc.S/BS and Oc. N/BS, respectively. In the second experiment (bone marrow cell culture study of tibiae), unloading for 7 and 14 days reduced the adherent stromal cell number, without significance. Unloading for 7 days significantly decreased the mineralized nodule formation. Reloading for the subsequent 14 days markedly increased the adherent stromal cell number and the mineralized nodule formation. Unloading for 7 days significantly increased the number of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive multinucleated cells. These data clearly demonstrate that unloading reduces bone formation and increases bone resorption, and subsequent reloading restores reduced bone formation and suppresses increased bone resorption, closely associated with the changes in adherent stromal cell number, mineralized nodule formation, and the number of TRAP-positive multinucleated cells.

PMID:
10469289
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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