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J Urol. 1999 Sep;162(3 Pt 2):1224-8.

Treatment of nocturnal enuresis with an ultrasound bladder volume controlled alarm device.

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  • 1Diagnostic Ultrasound Corp., Redmond, Washington, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Current treatment regimens for nocturnal enuresis are suboptimal. Medications such as desmopressin are efficacious for preventing the enuretic event but they offer little potential for a permanent cure and have side effects. Although the moisture alarm has good potential for a permanent cure, the child is mostly wet during treatment. Furthermore, the moisture alarm requires that the child make the somewhat remote association between the alarm event and a full bladder after the bladder has emptied. In this exploratory study bladder volume alarming, a new approach to treating nocturnal enuresis, was investigated.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

A total of 40 sequential children 6 to 16 years old with nonorganic nocturnal enuresis who had had at least 1 wetting episode weekly for greater than a year were divided into 2 groups. Each child wore a modified PCI 5000 miniature bladder volume measurement instrument during sleep. An alarm sounded when bladder volume reached 80% of the typical daytime voided volume in group 1 and at 80% of the typical enuretic volume in group 2. Group 2 patients also performed daytime bladder retention exercises in regard to instrument measured bladder volume versus a progressing target volume.

RESULTS:

In groups 1 and 2 the mean dryness rate before study initiation versus during the study was 32.9 and 9.3 versus 88.7 and 82.1%, respectively. Nighttime bladder capacity increased 69% in group 1 and 78% in group 2, while the cure rate was 55% (mean treatment period 10.5 months) and 60% (mean treatment period 7.2 months), respectively.

CONCLUSIONS:

Bladder volume tracking seems to approach the goals of ideal treatment for nocturnal enuresis in that it prevents the enuretic event, appears to facilitate a permanent cure and is noninvasive.

PMID:
10458472
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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