Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Med Educ. 1999 Aug;33(8):559-65.

Teaching medical students alcohol intervention skills: results of a controlled trial.

Author information

  • 1Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Newcastle, New South Wales, 2308, Australia.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To assess the relative effectiveness of videotape feedback and lecture methods for teaching alcohol brief intervention skills.

DESIGN:

In a controlled trial, two student blocks received a manual, lecture and demonstration about the principles and practice of brief alcohol intervention. In addition, experimental students made a 20-min videotape and participated in a 1.5-h small group feedback session. Prior to and after training, all students completed questionnaires and videotaped interviews with simulated patients.

SETTING:

Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences of the University of Newcastle, Australia.

SUBJECTS:

Final-year medical students.

RESULTS:

Levels of alcohol-related knowledge, attitudes and interactional skills as well as general interactional skills were significantly improved after teaching. Alcohol-related interactional skills that were unsatisfactory at pretest reached satisfactory standards at post-test. An intergroup comparison of the improvement between pre- and post-teaching scores indicated that there was no significant difference in the effectiveness of the two methods.

CONCLUSIONS:

Training can improve medical student performance in alcohol intervention. Further research is required to examine the relative effectiveness of different teaching methods.

PMID:
10447840
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Blackwell Publishing
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk