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Age Ageing. 1998 Dec;27 Suppl 3:5-11.

The Nottingham Longitudinal Study of Activity and Ageing: a methodological overview.

Author information

  • 1Centre for Ageing and Rehabilitation Studies, School of Health and Related Research, University of Sheffield, Northern General Hospital, UK. k.morgan@sheffield.ac.uk

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

first, to describe the background and methodological approach to the assessment of customary physical activity, health and psycho-social status used by the Nottingham Longitudinal Study of Activity and Ageing; second, to provide information on the sampling strategy and survey response rates for three waves of data collection; and, third, to provide information on the reliability and validity of the survey assessments.

DESIGN:

longitudinal study.

SUBJECTS:

1042 people originally aged 65 and over, randomly sampled from general practitioner lists in Nottingham, UK.

METHODS:

a descriptive overview of response rates (%), instrument reliability (alpha coefficients) and intercorrelations among measured outcomes (correlation coefficients and principal components analysis).

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

questionnaire-assessed levels of physical activity; instrumental measurements of handgrip strength, weight, demi-span and shoulder flexibility; brief assessments of depression, social engagement, life-satisfaction and cognitive impairment.

RESULTS:

the study achieved a baseline (TI) response rate of 80%, with re-interview rates of 88% and 73% for T2 (1989) and T3 (1993) surveys respectively. For both men and women, factor scores derived from first principal components extracted from T1 survey data showed significant (r > or = 0.4; P < 0.001) product moment correlations with instrumental measurements of handgrip strength and shoulder flexibility. All the brief assessment measures showed satisfactory levels of reliability (alpha > or = 0.7).

PMID:
10408677
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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