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Psychosomatics. 1999 Jul-Aug;40(4):293-7.

Psychiatric disorders and survival after lung transplantation.

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  • 1University of Iowa, Iowa City 52242, USA. woodman.catherine_L@iowa-city.va.gov

Abstract

The 30 patients who underwent lung transplantation between 1990 and 1996 were included in this study, and data were analyzed to find predictors of 1-year survival posttransplantation. All patients were followed throughout the posttransplantation period. Fifteen patients had a pretransplantation diagnosis of an anxiety and/or depressive disorders. Of the 30 patients transplanted, 19 survived 12 months or more, and 11 died less than 12 months posttransplantation. The > 12-month survival group had a mean age of 45.2 years at transplantation, compared with a mean age of 43.0 years in the < 12-month group (NS). The mean Psychosocial Assessment of Candidates for Transplant score and premorbid history of smoking did not differ between the groups. The > 12-month survival group had more psychiatric illness pretransplantation than the < 12-month survival group (56% vs. 27%, P < 0.05). The recipients with a psychiatric history (N = 15) were more likely to survive 1 year posttransplantation than the recipients without a psychiatric history (80% vs. 47%, P < 0.05) and were not significantly different from the recipients without a psychiatric history in terms of episodes of rejection, bronchiolitis obliterans, or noncompliance with treatment. Depression and anxiety are treatable disorders that occur frequently in patients with end-stage lung disease, and a premorbid history of either did not predict a worse outcome posttransplantation in this study of lung transplantation recipients.

PMID:
10402873
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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