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Am J Physiol. 1999 Jun;276(6 Pt 2):R1623-9.

Gut vagal afferent lesions increase meal size but do not block gastric preload-induced feeding suppression.

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  • 1Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA. gjs@jhmi.edu

Abstract

Subdiaphragmatic vagal afferent (SVA) signals arising from gut sites may provide critical feedback for the control of food intake within a meal. To evaluate the role of SVAs in both spontaneous and scheduled meals, food intake was assessed in two paradigms in male Sprague-Dawley rats. In the first study, control (Con) rats (n = 6) and rats with subdiaphragmatic vagal deafferentation (SDA) (n = 7) had 12-h nightly access to Ensure liquid diet (1 kcal/ml). SDA rats had larger and fewer meals and maintained initial rapid rates of licking, yet total numbers of licks were unaffected. In the second study, Con (n = 8) and SDA (n = 7) rats had scheduled access to 12. 5% liquid glucose after overnight food deprivation. Glucose intake was assessed after 5-ml gastric preloads of 0.9% saline or glucose, peptone, and Intralipid solutions at three concentrations (0.5, 1, and 2 kcal/ml). Glucose and peptone preloads suppressed intake similarly in Con and SDA rats, whereas Intralipid was ineffective. These results suggest that meal-related SVA signals 1) are not critical in determining preload-induced feeding suppression after deprivation, yet 2) contribute to satiety during spontaneous meals.

PMID:
10362740
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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