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Hum Mol Genet. 1999 Jun;8(6):1025-37.

Large genomic duplicons map to sites of instability in the Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome chromosome region (15q11-q13).

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  • 1Department of Human Genetics, University of Chicago, 924 East 57th Street, Chicago, IL 60637, USA.

Abstract

The most common etiology for Prader-Willi syndrome and Angelman syndrome is de novo interstitial deletion of chromosome 15q11-q13. Deletions and other recurrent rearrangements of this region involve four common 'hotspots' for breakage, termed breakpoints 1-4 (BP1-BP4). Construction of an approximately 4 Mb YAC contig of this region identified multiple sequence tagged sites (STSs) present at both BP2 and BP3, suggestive of a genomic duplication event. Interphase FISH studies demonstrated three to five copies on 15q11-q13, one copy on 16p11.1-p11.2 and one copy on 15q24 in normal controls, while analysis on two Class I deletion patients showed loss of approximately three signals at 15q11-q13 on one homolog. Multiple FISH signals were also observed at regions orthologous to both human chromosomes 15 and 16 in non-human primates, including Old World monkeys, suggesting that duplication of this region may have occurred approximately 20 million years ago. A BAC/PAC contig for the duplicated genomic segment (duplicon) demonstrated a size of approximately 400 kb. Surprisingly, the duplicon was found to contain at least seven different expressed sequence tags representing multiple genes/pseudogenes. Sequence comparison of STSs amplified from YAC clones uniquely mapped to BP2 or BP3 showed two different copies of the duplicon within BP3, while BP2 comprised a single copy. The orientation of BP2 and BP3 are inverted relative to each other, whereas the two copies within BP3 are in tandem. The presence of large duplicated segments on chromosome 15q11-q13 provides a mechanism for homologous unequal recombination events that may mediate the frequent rearrangements observed for this chromosome.

PMID:
10332034
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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