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J Clin Microbiol. 1999 Jun;37(6):1852-7.

Nonisotopic detection and typing of human papillomavirus DNA in genital samples by the line blot assay. The Canadian Women's HIV study group.

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  • 1Départements de Microbiologie-Immunologie et de Pédiatrie, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Québec, Canada. coutleef@sympatico.ca

Abstract

The line blot assay, a gene amplification method that combines PCR with nonisotopic detection of amplified DNA, was evaluated for its ability to detect human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA in genital specimens. Processed samples were amplified with biotin-labeled primers for HPV detection (primers MY09, MY11, and HMB01) and for beta-globin detection (primers PC03 and PC04). Amplified DNA products were hybridized by a reverse blot method with oligonucleotide probe mixtures fixed on a strip that allowed the identification of 27 HPV genotypes. The line blot assay was compared to a standard consensus PCR test in which HPV amplicons were detected with radiolabeled probes in a dot blot assay. Two hundred fifty-five cervicovaginal lavage specimens and cervical scrapings were tested in parallel by both PCR tests. The line blot assay consistently detected 25 copies of HPV type 18 per run. The overall positivity for the DNA of HPV types detectable by both methods was 37.7% (96 of 255 samples) by the line blot assay, whereas it was 43. 5% (111 of 255 samples) by the standard consensus PCR assay. The sensitivity and specificity of the line blot assay reached 84.7% (94 of 111 samples) and 98.6% (142 of 144 samples), respectively. The agreement for HPV typing between the two PCR assays reached 83.9% (214 of 255 samples). Of the 37 samples with discrepant results, 33 (89%) were resolved by avoiding coamplification of beta-globin and modifying the amplification parameters. With these modifications, the line blot assay compared favorably to an assay that used radiolabeled probes. Its convenience allows the faster analysis of samples for large-scale epidemiological studies. Also, the increased probe spectrum in this single hybridization assay permits more complete type discrimination.

PMID:
10325336
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC84968
Free PMC Article
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