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Chem Senses. 1999 Apr;24(2):155-60.

Sensory perception is related to the rate of change of volatile concentration in-nose during eating of model gels.

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  • 1Samworth Flavour Laboratory, Division of Food Sciences, University of Nottingham, Loughborough, UK. scxinb@szn1.agric.nottingham.ac.uk

Abstract

The relationship between perceived aroma and the volatile concentration measured in-nose was investigated during eating of a model food. Sensory ranking and time-intensity analysis (TI) were used to measure perceived aroma, while in-nose volatile concentration was monitored by atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry, which produced time release data. A gelatine-sucrose gel with a range of gelatine concentrations (2-8% w/w) and flavoured with furfuryl acetate was used as the model food. Sensory scaling showed decreased flavour intensities and TI showed a decrease in the flavour perceived over time, as the gelatine concentration increased. Studies in model systems and in people demonstrated that the different rates of release observed for different gelatine concentrations were not due to binding of volatile to protein in the gel, nor to mucous membranes, but were due to different rates of gel breakdown in-mouth. There were no significant differences in the maximum in-nose volatile concentrations for the different gelatine concentrations, so the amount of volatile present did not correlate well with the sensory analysis. However, the rates of volatile release were different for the different gels and showed a good correlation with sensory data.

PMID:
10321816
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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