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Psychopharmacology (Berl). 1999 Mar;143(1):102-10.

Effect of a selective dopamine D1 agonist (ABT-431) on smoked cocaine self-administration in humans.

Author information

  • 1Department of Psychiatry, College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA. mh235@columbia.edu

Abstract

RATIONALE:

Data in laboratory animals suggest that D1 receptor agonists may have potential utility for the treatment of cocaine abuse.

OBJECTIVE:

The effects of ABT-431, a selective agonist at the dopamine D1 receptor, on the reinforcing, cardiovascular and subjective effects of cocaine were investigated in humans.

METHOD:

Nine experienced cocaine smokers (8M, 1F), participated in nine self-administration sessions while residing on an inpatient research unit: three doses of ABT-431 (0, 2, 4 mg i.v.) were each given in combination with three doses of smoked cocaine (0, 12, 50 mg). ABT-431 was intravenously administered over a 1-h period immediately prior to cocaine self-administration sessions. A six-trial choice procedure (cocaine versus $5 merchandise vouchers) was utilized, with sessions consisting of: (a) one sample trial, where participants received the cocaine dose available that day, and (b) five choice trials, where participants chose between the available cocaine dose and one merchandise voucher.

RESULTS:

ABT-431 did not affect the number of times participants chose to smoke each dose of cocaine, but produced significant dose-dependent decreases in the subjective effects of cocaine, including ratings of "High," "Stimulated," dose liking, estimates of dose value, "Quality," and "Potency." Furthermore, there was a trend for ABT-431 (4 mg) to decrease cocaine craving. ABT-431 also increased heart rate, while decreasing systolic and diastolic pressure at each dose of cocaine.

CONCLUSIONS:

These data suggest that D1 agonists may have potential utility for the treatment of cocaine abuse.

PMID:
10227086
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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