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Maturitas. 1999 Jan 4;31(2):143-9.

Micturition complaints in postmenopausal women treated with continuously combined hormone replacement therapy: a prospective study.

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  • 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Free University Hospital, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To study parameters of the micturition pattern in postmenopausal women and the effect of an oral continuously combined HRT-regimen.

METHODS:

Hormone therapy consisted of 2 mg 17 beta-oestradiol in combination with either 2.5, 5, 10 or 15 mg dydrogesterone, orally once a day. The baseline assessment was done just before starting hormone replacement therapy, the second assessment took place after 6 months of hormone therapy. Data were collected using a standardized questionnaire and focused on diurnal urinary frequency, nocturnal urinary frequency and urinary incontinence as parameters of the micturition pattern. Furthermore, bacteriuria was assessed.

RESULTS:

One hundred and two women entered the study and 95 women completed 6 months of hormone replacement therapy. Urinary incontinence was reported by 44.1% of the women, in 19.6% of the women it occurred more than twice a week. Both diurnal frequency and nocturnal frequency was reported by 28.4% of the women. For women with frequency or nocturia, the number of voids significantly decreased after 6 months hormone replacement therapy. Nocturia disappeared in 65.4% of the women after treatment and 23.3% reported to be cured of their urinary incontinence. Bacteriuria was present in the same seven women before and after hormone treatment. Dydrogesterone dose did not influence treatment outcomes.

CONCLUSIONS:

Postmenopausal women report improvement on urinary incontinence and nocturia after 6 months of a continuously combined hormone replacement therapy regimen. The improvement was most outspoken with regard to nocturia. Bacteriuria was not influenced. Different doses of dydrogesterone did not effect these findings.

PMID:
10227008
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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