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Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1999 Apr;180(4):929-37.

Condom practices of urban teens using Norplant contraceptive implants, oral contraceptives, and condoms for contraception.

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  • 1Center for Family Planning and Reproductive Epidemiology, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The availability of long-acting hormonal birth control methods has created new contraceptive options for adolescents. The purpose of this study was to determine whether teens initiating these methods use condoms less frequently than teens using oral contraceptive pills or condoms alone and may therefore be at an increased risk of acquiring sexually transmitted infections.

STUDY DESIGN:

To investigate ongoing condom behavior in teens using levonorgestrel (Norplant) contraceptive implants, oral contraceptives, and condoms alone, we examined data from a 2-year prospective cohort study of 399 urban teens. The study consisted of 3 clinic-based cohorts of adolescent female contraceptive users: Norplant contraceptive implants (n = 200), oral contraceptives (n = 100), and condoms alone (n = 99). Data were collected at an admission interview and at 1- and 2-year follow-up from method continuers.

RESULTS:

Norplant contraceptive implant users were less likely than oral contraceptive or condom users to report condom use at last sex or consistent condom use at 1- and 2-year follow-up. The implant group showed a significant decrease in condom use from admission to 2 years after method initiation. The proportion of implant users self-reporting new sexually transmitted infections at 2-year follow-up, however, was not significantly greater than that of oral contraceptive or condom users.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our findings indicate that teen users of Norplant contraceptive implants are less likely to use condoms than teens who choose oral contraceptives but, probably because of differences in sexual behavior, are no more likely to self-report sexually transmitted infections. Our findings also indicate that teens who choose oral contraceptives and condoms do not use them consistently enough to avoid pregnancies or sexually transmitted infections.

PIP:

Ongoing condom behavior was examined among teens using Norplant contraceptive implants, oral contraceptives, and condoms alone. Data were examined from a 2-year prospective cohort study of 399 urban teens in San Francisco, California; 200 female adolescents used Norplant, 100 used oral contraceptives, and 99 used only condoms. Norplant users were less likely than oral contraceptive or condom users to report condom use at most recent sexual intercourse or consistent condom use at the 1- and 2-year follow-ups. However, while Norplant users had a significant decrease in condom use from admission to 2 years after method initiation, the proportion of implant users self-reporting new sexually transmitted infections at the 2-year follow-up was not significantly higher than that of oral contraceptive or condom users.

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PMID:
10203661
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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