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Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 1999 Apr;19(4):1020-5.

Coagulation factors II, V, VII, and X, prothrombin gene 20210G-->A transition, and factor V Leiden in coronary artery disease: high factor V clotting activity is an independent risk factor for myocardial infarction.

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  • 1Central Hematology Laboratory, Inselspital, University Hospital Bern, Switzerland.

Abstract

Increased levels of hemostatic factors and genetic mutations of proteins involved in coagulation may play a role in the pathogenesis of coronary artery disease. We investigated clotting activity of factors II (FII:C), V (FV:C), VII (FVII:C), and X (FX:C), the prothrombin gene 20210G-->A transition, and the factor V Leiden mutation in 200 survivors of myocardial infarction and in 100 healthy controls. FV:C (P<0.0001) and FVII:C (P<0.0001) were found to be independent risk factors for myocardial infarction. High FV:C or high FVII:C combined with smoking or arterial hypertension increased the relative risk for myocardial infarction up to 50-fold. One of 177 patients (0.6%) and 4 of 89 controls (4.5%) had the prothrombin 20210 AG genotype. Eleven of 177 patients (6.2%) and 6 of 89 controls (6.7%) were heterozygous for the factor V Leiden mutation. No homozygous carrier for these mutations was found. Neither the prothrombin gene 20210G-->A transition (odds ratio [OR], 0.1; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.01 to 1.1) nor the factor V Leiden mutation (OR, 1.0; 95% CI, 0.4 to 2.8) were associated with an increased relative risk for myocardial infarction. In conclusion, our data indicate that neither the prothrombin gene 20210G-->A transition nor the factor V Leiden mutation are risk factors for myocardial infarction. High FVII:C was confirmed to be an independent risk factor for myocardial infarction. Moreover, we describe for the first time that high FV:C is an independent risk factor for myocardial infarction.

PMID:
10195931
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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