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Int J Epidemiol. 1999 Feb;28(1):90-4.

Poverty area residence and changes in depression and perceived health status: evidence from the Alameda County Study.

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  • 1Behavioral Risk Factors Program, School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley 94720, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Previous evidence from the Alameda County Study indicated that residential area has an independent effect on risk for mortality, adjusting for a variety of important individual characteristics. The current research examined the effect of poverty area residence on risk for developing depressive symptoms and decline in perceived health status in a sample of 1737.

METHODS:

Data were from a longitudinal population-based cohort. Multiple logistic regression analyses were used.

RESULTS:

Age- and sex-adjusted risk for incident high levels of depressive symptoms in 1974 was higher for poverty area residents (odds ratio [OR] 2.14; confidence interval [CI]: 1.49-3.06). Those reporting excellent/good health in 1965 were at higher risk for having fair/poor health in 1974 if they lived in a poverty area (age- and sex-adjusted OR 3.30; CI: 2.32-4.71). Independent of individual income, education, smoking status, body mass index, and alcohol consumption, poverty area residence remained associated with change in outcome variables.

CONCLUSION:

These results further support the hypothesis that characteristics of place affect health conditions and health status.

PMID:
10195670
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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