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Br J Cancer. 1999 Mar;79(9-10):1549-52.

Discrimination of double primary lung cancer from intrapulmonary metastasis by p53 gene mutation.

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  • 1Second Department of Surgery, School of Medicine, Fukuoka University, Japan.

Abstract

When multiple synchronous lung tumours are identified, discrimination of multicentric lung cancers from intrapulmonary metastases by clinical findings is often difficult. We used genetic alterations in p53 gene as a discrimination marker of double primary lung cancers from single lung cancer with intrapulmonary metastasis. Twenty of 861 patients with primary lung cancer who underwent lung resection were selected as subjects because they showed synchronous double solid tumours of the same histological type in the unilateral lung without distant metastases. In addition, they had been diagnosed as lung carcinoma with intrapulmonary metastasis by clinical and histological findings. DNAs were extracted from paraffin-embedded tissue of paired tumours from these 20 patients. Exons 5-9 of the p53 gene were examined for genetic alterations in the tumours by polymerase chain reaction, single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis and subsequent DNA sequencing analysis. Three different patterns in the distribution of p53 mutations in double lung tumours were observed: [A] mutation in only one of the tumours (four cases), [B] different mutations in the tumours (two cases), and [C] same mutation in both tumours (one case). The cases of [A] or [B] patterns could be classified as double primary lung cancers, while the case of the [C] pattern was suggested to be lung cancer with intrapulmonary metastasis. These results suggested that the multicentric cancers were more frequent than the intrapulmonary metastatic cancers in double cancer cases.

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