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Am J Health Promot. 1996 Sep-Oct;11(1):54-61.

The relationship between perceived stress and self-reported illness-related absenteeism.

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  • 1Oklahoma State University, School of Health, Physical Education and Leisure, Calvin Physical Education Center, Stillwater 74078-0616, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To investigate the association between perceived stress and illness-related work absenteeism.

DESIGN:

A standardized health profile questionnaire developed by Johnson & Johnson Advanced Behavioral Technologies, Inc., was used to collect demographic and personal health data between June 1988 and January 1993. Chi-square, odds ratio, and stepwise regression tests were used to analyze perceived stress and self-reported absenteeism data.

SETTING:

Worksite health promotion programs in 250 U.S. companies.

SUBJECTS:

Subjects consisted of 79,070 employees.

MEASURES:

Stress data, grouped as low, moderate, and high, were correlated with absenteeism data grouped by annual days missed (None, 1 to 2, 3 to 4, and 5+).

RESULTS:

Significant relationships were found (p < or = .05) between high stress and absenteeism for both genders. Female workers reported higher stress levels and absenteeism than men. Those with high stress were 2.22 more likely to be absent 5+ days per year than those with low stress. Work, finances, and family were the highest stress sources. Greatest absenteeism predictors were health, legal, social, and financial stress.

CONCLUSIONS:

These data primarily represented self-selected white workers and may not apply to all employees. However, if high stress relates to absenteeism, these data may provide valuable information for program design in stress management.

PMID:
10163451
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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