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Clin Chem. 1999 Apr;45(4):505-9.

Urinary cotinine and exposure to parental smoking in a population of children with asthma.

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  • 1Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Aix-Marseille II, Bd J Moulin, 13005 Marseille Cedex 5, France.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Studies of the effects of tobacco smoke often rely on reported exposure to cigarette smoke, a measure that is subject to bias. We describe here the relationship between parental smoking exposure as assessed by urinary cotinine excretion and lung function in children with asthma.

METHODS:

We studied 90 children 4-14 years of age, who reported a confirmed diagnosis or symptoms of asthma. In each child, we assessed baseline pulmonary function (spirometry) and bronchial responsiveness to carbachol stimulation. Urinary cotinine was measured by HPLC with ultraviolet detection.

RESULTS:

Urinary cotinine concentrations in the children were significantly correlated (P <0.001) with the number of cigarettes the parents, especially the mothers, smoked. Bronchial responsiveness to carbachol (but not spirometry test results) was correlated (P <0.03) with urinary cotinine in the children.

CONCLUSION:

Passive smoke exposure increases the bronchial responsiveness to carbachol in asthmatic children.

Copyright 1999 American Association for Clinical Chemistry

PMID:
10102910
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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