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Biotechnol Bioeng. 1999 May 20;63(4):464-72.

Relationship between recombinant activated protein C secretion rates and mRNA levels in baby hamster kidney cells.

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  • 1Biotechnology Laboratory and Department of Chemical & Bio-Resource Engineering 237-6174 University Boulevard, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z3, Canada.

Abstract

Analysis of 12 baby hamster kidney (BHK) clones in exponential growth revealed a linear relationship between cell-specific recombinant activated protein C (APC) production rates and APC mRNA levels. This correlation indicated that mRNA levels limited APC productivity. Two strategies were employed to increase APC mRNA levels and APC productivity. First, sodium butyrate was added to increase mRNA levels by two- to sixfold in five APC-producing clones to obtain up to 2.7-fold increase in APC production rate. The second strategy was to retransfect an APC-producing BHK cell line with a vector containing additional APC cDNA and a mutant DHFR. This mutant DHFR gene allowed the selection of retransfected clones in higher MTX concentrations. Over two-fold higher mRNA levels were obtained in these retransfected clones and the cell-specific APC production rate increased twofold. At the highest level of APC secretion, increases in mRNA levels did not result in higher rates of APC production. Analysis of the intracellular APC content revealed a possible saturation in the secretory pathway at high mRNA levels. The relation between mRNA level and APC secretion rate was also investigated in batch culture. The levels of total cellular RNA, APC mRNA, and beta-actin mRNA were relatively stable while cells were in the exponential growth phase, but rapidly decreased when cells reached the stationary phase. The decline of cell-specific APC mRNA levels correlated with a decline in APC secretion rates, which indicated that the mRNA levels continued to limit the rates beyond the exponential phase and into the declining growth and stationary phases of batch APC production.

Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

PMID:
10099627
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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