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Bone Marrow Transplant. 1999 Feb;23(3):259-63.

Ultrasound B-mode changes in the uterus and ovaries and Doppler changes in the uterus after total body irradiation and allogeneic bone marrow transplantation in childhood.

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  • 1Section of Growth and Reproduction, The Juliane Marie Centre, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark.

Abstract

Internal genitalia and uterine blood flow were assessed by ultrasound in 12 females 4.0-10.9 years after total body irradiation and allogeneic bone marrow transplantation for childhood leukaemia or lymphoma. Median age of the participants was 12.7 years (range 6.1-17.6) at bone marrow transplantation and 21.5 years (11.6-25.6) at the follow-up study. At follow-up all had entered puberty and 11/12 females had experienced the menarche. Eight females received sex steroid replacement therapy, three had spontaneous pubertal development and one woman experienced symptoms of estrogen deficiency. Median uterine and ovarian volumes were significantly reduced to -2.6 standard deviation scores (SDS) (-6.3 to -0.6), P = 0.002, and -2.6 SDS (-4.8 to -0.5), P = 0.002, respectively, compared with normal controls. Follicles were only detectable in two individuals. Uterine blood flow was impaired, as a systolic blood flow could be measured in 6/9 individuals, and a diastolic blood flow in 1/9 females. Our results indicate that the prescribed dosage of hormone replacement therapy, which was sufficient to induce bleeding and suppress other stigmata of premature menopause, was inadequate to generate normal uterine growth. In order to achieve uterine growth higher doses of hormone replacement therapy may be required. Our results confirm pelvic ultrasound as a reliable tool for investigation of internal female genitalia; however, in an infertility setting further tests are indicated.

PMID:
10084257
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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