Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1999 Mar 16;96(6):2805-10.

Syndecan-4 signals cooperatively with integrins in a Rho-dependent manner in the assembly of focal adhesions and actin stress fibers.

Author information

  • 1Cutaneous Biology Research Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA.

Abstract

The assembly of focal adhesions and actin stress fibers by cells plated on fibronectin depends on adhesion-mediated signals involving both integrins and cell-surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans. These two cell-surface receptors interact with different domains of fibronectin. To attempt to identify the heparan sulfate proteoglycans involved, we used fibronectin-null (FN-/-) mouse fibroblasts to eliminate the contribution of endogenous fibronectin during the analysis. FN-/- fibroblasts plated on the cell-binding domain of fibronectin or on antibodies directed against mouse beta1 integrin chains attach but fail to spread and do not form focal adhesions or actin stress fibers. When such cells are treated with antibodies directed against the ectodomain of mouse syndecan-4, they spread fully and assemble focal adhesions and actin stress fibers indistinguishable from those seen in cells plated on intact fibronectin. These results identify syndecan-4 as a heparan sulfate proteoglycan involved in the assembly process. The antibody-stimulated assembly of focal adhesions and actin stress fibers in cells plated on the cell-binding domain of fibronectin can be blocked with C3 exotransferase, an inhibitor of the small GTP-binding protein Rho. Treatment of cells with lysophosphatidic acid, which activates Rho, results in full spreading and assembly of focal adhesions and actin stress fibers in fibroblasts plated on the cell-binding domain of fibronectin. We conclude that syndecan-4 and integrins can act cooperatively in generating signals for cell spreading and for the assembly of focal adhesions and actin stress fibers. We conclude further that these joint signals are regulated in a Rho-dependent manner.

PMID:
10077592
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC15850
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk