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Stroke. 1999 Mar;30(3):484-8.

Randomized, placebo-controlled trial of anticoagulant treatment with low-molecular-weight heparin for cerebral sinus thrombosis.

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  • 1Leyenburg Hospital, The Hague Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE:

Treatment of cerebral sinus thrombosis with heparin is controversial. We conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled multicenter trial to examine whether anticoagulant treatment improves outcome in patients with sinus thrombosis.

METHODS:

Patients were randomized between body weight-adjusted subcutaneous nadroparin (180 anti-factor Xa units/kg per 24 hours) and matching placebo for 3 weeks (double-blind part of trial), followed by 3 months of oral anticoagulants for patients allocated nadroparin (open part). Patients with cerebral hemorrhage caused by sinus thrombosis were also included.

RESULTS:

Sixty patients were enrolled, and none were lost to follow-up. In 1 patient the diagnosis proved wrong after randomization. After 3 weeks, 6 of 30 patients (20%) in the nadroparin group and 7 of 29 patients (24%) in the placebo group had a poor outcome, defined as death or Barthel Index score of <15 (risk difference, -4%; 95% CI, -25 to 17%; NS). After 12 weeks, 4 of 30 patients (13%) in the nadroparin group and 6 of 29 (21%) in the placebo group had a poor outcome, defined as death or Oxford Handicap Score of >/=3 (risk difference, -7%; 95% CI, -26% to 12%; NS). There were no new symptomatic cerebral hemorrhages. One patient in the nadroparin group had a major gastrointestinal hemorrhage, and 1 patient in the placebo group died from clinically suspected pulmonary embolism.

CONCLUSIONS:

Patients with cerebral sinus thrombosis treated with anticoagulants (low-molecular-weight heparin followed by oral anticoagulation) had a favorable outcome more often than controls, but the difference was not statistically significant. Anticoagulation proved to be safe, even in patients with cerebral hemorrhage.

PMID:
10066840
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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