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Med Sci Sports Exerc. 1999 Feb;31(2):323-30.

Effects of ballistic training on preseason preparation of elite volleyball players.

Author information

  • 1School of Exercise Science & Sport Management, Southern Cross University, Lismore, NSW, Australia. rnewton@scu.edu.au

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The purpose of this study was to determine whether ballistic resistance training would increase the vertical jump (VJ) performance of already highly trained jump athletes.

METHODS:

Sixteen male volleyball players from a NCAA Division I team participated in the study. A Vertec was used to measure standing vertical jump and reach (SJR) and jump and reach from a three-step approach (AJR). Several types of vertical jump tests were also performed on a Plyometric Power System and a forceplate to measure force, velocity, and power production during vertical jumping. The subjects completed the tests and were then randomly divided into two groups, control and treatment. All subjects completed the usual preseason volleyball on-court training combined with a resistance training program. In addition, the treatment group completed 8 wk of squat jump training while the control group completed squat and leg press exercises at a 6RM load. Both groups were retested at the completion of the training period.

RESULTS:

The treatment group produced a significant increase in both SJR and AJR of 5.9+/-3.1% and 6.3+/-5.1%. respectively. These increases were significantly greater than the pre- to postchanges produced by the control group, which were not significant for either jump. Analysis of the data from the various other jump tests suggested increased overall force output during jumping, and in particular increased rate of force development were the main contributors to the increased jump height.

CONCLUSIONS:

These results lend support to the effectiveness of ballistic resistance training for improving vertical jump performance in elite jump athletes.

PMID:
10063823
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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