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Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1999 Mar 2;96(5):2467-72.

Molecular identification of human G-substrate, a possible downstream component of the cGMP-dependent protein kinase cascade in cerebellar Purkinje cells.

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  • 1Laboratory for Learning and Memory, RIKEN, Brain Science Institute, Hirosawa 2-1, Wako, 351-0198, Japan.

Abstract

G-substrate, an endogenous substrate for cGMP-dependent protein kinase, exists almost exclusively in cerebellar Purkinje cells, where it is possibly involved in the induction of long-term depression. A G-substrate cDNA was identified by screening expressed sequence tag databases from a human brain library. The deduced amino acid sequence of human G-substrate contained two putative phosphorylation sites (Thr-68 and Thr-119) with amino acid sequences [KPRRKDT(p)PALH] that were identical to those reported for rabbit G-substrate. G-substrate mRNA was expressed almost exclusively in the cerebellum as a single transcript. The human G-substrate gene was mapped to human chromosome 7p15 by radiation hybrid panel analysis. In vitro translation products of the cDNA showed an apparent molecular mass of 24 kDa on SDS/PAGE which was close to that of purified rabbit G-substrate (23 kDa). Bacterially expressed human G-substrate is a heat-stable and acid-soluble protein that cross-reacts with antibodies raised against rabbit G-substrate. Recombinant human G-substrate was phosphorylated efficiently by cGMP-dependent protein kinase exclusively at Thr residues, and it was recognized by antibodies specific for rabbit phospho-G-substrate. The amino acid sequences surrounding the sites of phosphorylation in G-substrate are related to those around Thr-34 and Thr-35 of the dopamine- and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein DARPP-32 and inhibitor-1, respectively, two potent inhibitors of protein phosphatase 1. However, purified G-substrate phosphorylated by cGMP-dependent protein kinase inhibited protein phosphatase 2A more effectively than protein phosphatase 1, suggesting a distinct role as a protein phosphatase inhibitor.

PMID:
10051666
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC26808
Free PMC Article

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