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Dtsch Med Wochenschr. 2010 Jun;135(22):1113-7. doi: 10.1055/s-0030-1247867. Epub 2010 May 7.

[Recallsystems in primary care practices to increase vaccination rates against seasonal influenza].

[Article in German]

Author information

  • 1Bundeszentrale für gesundheitliche Aufklärung, Köln. silja.wortberg@bzga.de

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE:

Influenza is a major health threat for high-risk groups like elderly patients and those with chronic conditions. The aim of this study was to determine the number of physicians (general practitioners, internists, paediatricians) who use recall systems in order to increase the vaccination rate against influenza among high-risk groups. Also measured was the vaccination rate among these physicians and their attitude towards influenza and influenza vaccination of target groups. In addition, correlations between physicians' attitudes, their own immune status and the use of recall systems were calculated.

METHODS:

A telephone-based survey was conducted in which 700 physicians participated (445 general practitioners, 180 internists and 75 paediatricians).

RESULTS:

25% of physicians use a recall system to increase vaccination rates among target groups. (31% in West Germany and 12% in East Germany). Telephone-based recall systems are used most often (40%), while personal (21%), written (17%) and electronic (2%) reminders are less widespread. 70% of the physicians themselves were regularly vaccinated against influenza, 16% irregularly and 14% never. Among physicians from West Germany there is a strong correlation between their own immune status and the use of a recall system: The percentage of physicians using a recall systems is significantly higher if they are vaccinated regularly (37%) rather than never (18%). 85% of those physicians who use a recall system say that vaccination rates had increased as a result.

CONCLUSIONS:

Increased use of a recall system can result in higher immunization rates against seasonal influenza among high-risk groups.

Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart, New York.

PMID:
20455199
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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