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J Med Libr Assoc. Jan 2005; 93(1): 143–188.
PMCID: PMC545145

Proceedings, 104th Annual Meeting Medical Library Association, Inc., Washington, DC, May 21–26, 2004

Pauline O. Fulda, MS, Editor1 and Rebecca K. Satterthwaite, MS, Assistant Editor2

CONTENTS

  • Introduction143
  • Welcome to MLA '04143
  • Presidential Address: Patricia L. Thibodeau145
  • Plenary Sessions148
  • Business Meeting I148
  • Awards Ceremony159
  • Business Meeting II, Presidential Inaugural Address: >Joanne G. Marshall, and MLA '05 Invitation165
  • Section Programming173
  • Morning of Innovation178
  • Poster Presentations179
  • Other Meetings and Events184
  • Open Forums185
  • Sunrise Seminars186
  • Technology Showcases186
  • Power Surges186
  • National Library of Medicine Update186
  • Legislative Update186
  • Other Special Events and Receptions186
  • Continuing Education Courses and Symposia187
  • Resources and Services187
  • Appendix: Acronyms Used in Proceedings188

The Medical Library Association, Inc. (MLA), held its 104th annual meeting in Washington, DC, May 21–26, 2004, at the Hilton Washington. The meeting theme was MLA '04 “Seize the Power.” Total MLA meeting attendance was 2,644.

Additional meeting content, including the meeting program and electronic presentations from business, plenary, poster, and section presentations can be found via the MLA '04 Website on MLANET <http://www.mlanet.org/am/am2004/>. Candid photos can be found at the site as well.

WELCOME TO MLA '04

Sunday, May 23, 2004

The opening session was convened by MLA President Patricia L. Thibodeau, who welcomed members to the meeting. She then recognized the 228 first-time attendees and new members and thanked the 2004 National Program Committee (NPC) for delivering a “powerful” program that would offer something for everyone. Next on the agenda was the introduction of Beverly Murphy, chair of the Medical Library Association's Mid-Atlantic Chapter, who extended greetings from the chapter.

Beverly Murphy: As chair of the Mid-Atlantic Chapter of the Medical Library Association, which includes the District of Columbia, I have the honor of welcoming you to the 104th annual meeting of the Medical Library Association. I know that you will take advantage of all the opportunities that this meeting has to offer. And Pat has so eloquently laid out several of them. So, enjoy yourselves while you are here, and Seize Your Power! Welcome!

President Thibodeau then introduced several special invited guests including Clifford Lynch, executive director of the Coalition for Networked Information; Dwayne Webster, executive director of the Association of Research Libraries; and Bob Martin of the Institute of Museum and Library Services. International guests were Penny Logan, president of the Canadian Health Libraries Association/Association des Bibliothèques de la santé du Canada (CHLA/ABSC); Madeleine Lefebvre, president of the Canadian Library Association; Tony McSean, past-president of the European Association for Health Information Libraries (EAHIL); and Ian Snowley, director of information services, Royal Society of Medicine, London, England, United Kingdom. A final guest was Abel L. Packer, director of Biblioteca Regional de Medicina (BIREME)/Pan American Health Organization (PAHO)/World Health Organization (WHO), Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences Information, and chair of the Ninth International Congress on Medical Librarianship (ICML9), which will be held in Salvador, Bahia, Brazil. Mr. Packer extended an invitation to attend the international congress and thanked MLA for its support. President Thibodeau also introduced two guests from the sister library program sponsored by the International Cooperation Section. They were Velta Poznaka, director, Medical Research Library of Latvia, Riga, Latvia, and Glendine Smith, director, Holberton Hospital Medical Library, Antigua, West Indies.

The president then introduced Mary Joan (MJ) Tooey, chair of the 2004 NPC, and Janice E. Kelly and Anne M. Linton, cochairs of the Local Assistance Committee (LAC), to give opening comments.

MJ Tooey: Pat, thank you for the introduction. On behalf of the 2004 NPC, I welcome you all to Washington, DC. When former President Carol Jenkins, FMLA, asked me to undertake this project almost three years ago, 2004 seemed so far away. But, here we are today, Seizing the Power! The 2004 National Program Committee has worked hard to ensure that your annual meeting experience is both powerful and empowering. Whether you are into the power of many or the power of one, there is something here for you! You can wear power suits, eat power lunches, or even take power naps!

You will not nap through our plenary sessions! Our McGovern lecturer, media geographer, Dr. Harm de Blij, promises to wake up our brains this morning with his talk, “Geographic Illiteracy and National Security.” For the Doe lecture, whatever can Rick Forsman, FMLA, mean by “Life and Death on the Coral Reef: An Ecological Perspective on Scholarly Publishing in the Health Sciences?” I guess you will have to come to hear him tomorrow morning! And, to kick off the Morning of Innovation on Wednesday, noted inventor and innovator, Dr. Raymond Kurzweil will speak on “Innovation and Medicine in an Era of Accelerating Information Technologies.” And speaking of the Morning of Innovation, the NPC promises a thought-provoking morning as we examine three major issues confronting our profession: recruitment, new publishing models, and new roles. How to pick which ones to attend? But MLA is not all about plenary sessions, it is about sharing and learning and networking and, dare I say, having a powerful good time! Go to the papers, and posters, and parties. Open yourself up to the energy all around you. My husband often comments about how I always come back so pumped up from MLA. All I can say is, “Do you know how energizing it is to be in one place with so many people who speak your language, and share your thoughts, and know the same acronyms?”

Finally, no meeting plans itself. Many people have contributed to MLA '04—the always-informative and helpful MLA headquarters staff, led by the unflappable Ray Naegele. We have the excellent Hall-Erickson team of Paul Graller and Brenda Dreier; and literally hundreds of dedicated section and chapter members. I would like to introduce the very creative NPC members, because they have done a tremendous amount of work over the last couple of years. Please stand as I call out your names: Jo-Ann Babish, Catherine Burroughs, Daniel Dollar, Kathel Dunn, Patricia J. Hamilton, Carolyn Anne Reid, Ruth A. Riley, Gabriel R. Rios, Elizabeth Smigielski, and finally, the other man in my life for the last couple of years, Gary A. Freiburger, the NPC associate chair. He has provided good ideas, good counsel, and good sense and good friendship. Not to mention that he made an excellent surfer dude last year—who would have thought? Every person on this team had assignments that they carried out impeccably, with little or no griping, at least not to my face. They had ideas and suggestions and were truly a powerful team! When we started our planning, we decided at our first meeting that we would have fun. And we had fun, didn't we? Yes.

Well, now it is your turn as the NPC turns the meeting over to you. Listen, learn, think, ponder, argue, discuss, and allow the power of new ideas to seep into your mind. Have fun and Seize the Power!

Now, I would like to turn the microphone over to two ladies who completed the NPC team, Janice E. Kelly and Anne M. Linton, the local assistance chairs. They are not just colleagues; they are my friends. I have known them for a long time through the Mid-Atlantic Chapter. They must be my friends, because they agreed to do the job and have never looked back. They are here to welcome you on behalf of the Local Assistance Committee.

Anne Linton: Good morning everyone! Janice and I would like to welcome you to Washington, DC. While you are here in the seat of our nation's government, you will have the chance to experience electrifying speakers, recharge your professional goals, and power up for the challenges ahead. However, Washington is not only a seat of power; it is also our hometown—the place where we live, work, and play every day. The members of the Local Assistance Committee want you to see that side of our city, too. So, for the past year, this dedicated group of volunteers has been diligently compiling information to make your stay here both powerful and special. The restaurant guide is full of places where we actually dine with family and friends. Our favorite daytrips are highlighted on the Web page and at the Hospitality Booth. The walks and gardens— where we retreat when we find Washington too formal, too frantic, or too crowded—are all featured as part of the “Tours and Events” program. Some of you have already had the chance to take tea at the Washington Beaux Arts Carnegie Library and City Museum, to walk in the footsteps of Abraham Lincoln, or to relax at the Botanic Gardens. Others of you may be waiting to experience hometown Washington. It is not too late. Stop by the Hospitality Booth and sign up for a dine-a-round or a local tour. Check our newsletter, The Capitol Current, for the daily schedule of activities. Ask the friendly men and women sporting sun flashers like this about which restaurants and museums are best. And do not forget to ask them how to get there, too! We, the members of the Local Assistance Committee, are all here to help make your visit to Washington memorable!

Janice Kelly: Anne and I would like to thank the members of the Local Assistance Committee for their hard work and efforts. Would those of you present please stand? This is a group of individuals from all over the mid-Atlantic region who collaborated through email, in person, and over the phone to pull together whatever was needed to make this meeting great! They even managed to gather in downtown Washington, known for its lack of snow plows, on a day after a major snowstorm for a planning session! If we gather power from the ideas, support, and encouragement of our colleagues, then the Local Assistance Committee for MLA '04 must be one of the most powerful groups around! Their teamwork pulses with energy. While we cannot name everyone who helped, we would like to thank the committee and subcommittee chairs publicly: Patricia Wilson and Leah Pellegrino for the Publicity and Promotion Committee, Velora Jernigan-Pedrick for social events and library tours, Bebbie Rhodes and Jeanne Larsen for hospitality, Adam Glazer for the Website Subcommittee, Amy S. Blaine and Patricia A. Hammond for the Newsletter Subcommittee, Rudine Anderson for facilities assistance, and Richard Billingsley and George Paul for the Restaurant Guide. Our heartfelt thanks to each of you and to all of your committee members for a wonderful job.

To those of you in the audience, we are pleased to welcome you to Washington, DC. May you find this meeting rewarding and the city of Washington enjoyable. Have a great meeting and thank you.

President Thibodeau then formally thanked the many sponsors who gave financial contributions totaling more than $80,000 to support the annual meeting.

MJ Tooey formally introduced MLA President Thibodeau, who then gave her presidential address.

PRESIDENTIAL ADDRESS

Patricia L. Thibodeau: I want to thank all of you for joining me this year in seizing our power as librarians and promoting our value to our institutions, to health care, and to society.

I have had a wonderful year as president because of all of you! Your energy, innovation, and excitement have truly been inspiring.

As I said last year, being elected MLA president by my colleagues is a great honor, and one that I will cherish always. I have had a chance to become more acquainted, and in some cases reacquainted, with medical librarians across the country and the globe, and I have had the opportunity to delve more deeply into the issues that concern us as health sciences librarians, learn more about legislative actions, and talk to national leaders about our importance to biomedical research, health care, and health information literacy. Thanks so much for this special opportunity!

While traveling to the various chapter meetings and working with the various MLA units, I had the privilege of seeing you, our members, in action. I have seen your innovation and creativity in addressing issues, creating new services, and promoting our value. I have taken many ideas back to my own library and institution.

I have heard your frustrations and concerns, but, more importantly, I have seen how you have dealt professionally and proactively with tough economic situations and administrators who question the worth of our libraries. In responding to these challenges, you have shown expert problem-solving and decision-making skills. You have embraced new ways of thinking about our roles as librarians and have taken up the spirit of exploration and experimentation, trying new approaches and expanding on traditional roles. And you have kept patron and institutional needs foremost in your minds, translating these ideas, issues, and challenges into the culture and needs of your specific library settings. You have truly seized your power as librarians and demonstrated the power and value of libraries to the biomedical community. Your daily advocacy is crucial. MLA cannot promote librarians and libraries without you.

Like you, MLA has had a very busy and successful year. In fact, there is so much going on that it would take me hours to talk about all the exciting activities. Now, don't groan. I have promised to keep this short, and I will. But I do hope you take an opportunity to review the annual reports and browse MLANET to see the tremendous amount of work and accomplishments that committees, task forces, sections, chapters, and SIGs have been pursuing on your behalf.

Before I move on to highlight several of this year's major initiatives and accomplishments, I do want to mention that being MLA president has also given me a greater understanding of the need to take a more global perspective and become more aware of the international initiatives focusing on access to health information.

Global initiatives

Over the year, I have also come to realize that MLA members have been building global bridges with other libraries for many years, so, as part of my presentation today, I want to share with you a few pictures of the librarians and libraries involved in these global partnerships.

My presentation today will also spend more time on MLA's global activities, not because the other priorities are not important, but because we need to start thinking more globally. The responses to the SARS and AIDS epidemics have shown us how the use of technology can facilitate the flow of ideas, data, research, and knowledge and bridge the miles between countries and continents and even health care delivery systems. As librarians, we must begin to think and act on an international scale as our environment shifts to a global economy and a worldwide focus on access to quality health care.

I do want to briefly share a wonderful experience I had this past summer. As MLA president, I had a chance to attend the meeting of the International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) in Berlin, Germany, and there I met many librarians from the health sciences and other settings, who represented countries from around the world. I had many great conversations with so many different people! I was also proud to see how many MLA members are involved in IFLA, and I have listed just a few of the members who are active in this international association.

However, I was also intrigued by Berlin itself, the setting for the conference, a beautiful blend of the old, the traditional, and the cutting-edge new. While Berliners have not forgotten the past or the wall that divided their city and country, they have looked to the future, preserved history and tradition when it has made sense, but embraced the new, especially technologies, in order to move forward. Like Berliners, we as librarians have also had to tear down the physical and mental walls of our traditional settings to embrace technology and move forward into a more virtual world of services and resources while still preserving our underlying values and traditions. The plenary session featuring Ray Kurzweil, during our Wednesday Morning of Innovation, will touch on this theme and highlight the need to discover innovative pathways and solutions to our future.

MLA has made a commitment to take a fresh look at its global activities and partnerships. The Task Force on Global Initiatives was appointed this year and will meet at the annual meeting to review MLA's existing programs and brainstorm about new directions.

MLA is pursuing a bilateral agreement with the Association for Health Information and Libraries in Africa (AHILA), which will create a stronger partnership between our associations.

We also have a number of people who have generously agreed to serve as MLA's representatives to international associations, including:

  • Tom Flemming, Canadian Health Libraries Association
  • Eve-Marie Lacroix, European Association for Health and Information Libraries (EAHIL)
  • Carla J. Funk, CAE, IFLA
  • J. Michael Homan, World Congress on Fair Use and Libraries

Many of you have also reached out to our colleagues and the health professionals in Iraq by providing books and journals to support health care. On Monday at 5 p.m., there will be a Power Surge session on the situation in Iraq, and I urge you to attend. I know that other members have reached out to many other countries as well, and I want to thank all of you who have made the commitment to help other librarians and libraries.

As we have heard, the Ninth International Congress of Medical Librarians (ICML9) will be held in Salvador, Bahia, Brazil, September 20–23, 2005. Many MLA members are involved in this conference as well, including Donald Lindbergh, Becky Lyon, Bruce Madge, Tony McSean, and Lenny Rhine, just to name a few, and I have been invited to serve on the International Committee as well. I hope you stop by the ICML9 booth and learn more about the conference.

This year, the president's luncheon at the annual meeting will bring together eighteen international librarians and leaders to share ideas and identify further opportunities for collaboration and partnerships.

And last, but far from least, is the strong commitment and high level of activities in the International Cooperation Section (ICS). ICS provided the MLA Board with an excellent analysis of the accomplishments of the sister libraries program, and their work will be invaluable to the Task Force on Global Initiatives.

On another international note, this morning's plenary speaker, Harm de Blij, has used his expertise in geography to study a number of global issues and will talk about geographic illiteracy and national security.

MLA has become a global meeting as well. There are more than sixty-seven international colleagues attending this meeting from over twenty countries. I would like to ask our international colleagues to stand and be recognized.

Advocacy initiatives

Advocacy has remained a top priority for MLA over the past year and will continue to be a priority into the future. With our communications firm, PCI, we have looked for methods of strengthening our promotional capabilities, as well making sure librarians are recognized in the national media.

And while there were several extreme approaches out there, we try to work on a message that emphasizes the importance and value of your skills and services to health care.

The MLA Advocacy Toolbox has provided members with a number of useful tips including communicating with our administrators, negotiating for better compensation, and promoting the library on the local level. The toolbox has won the Publicity Club of Chicago's Golden Trumpet Award, which is the club's highest award.

Librarians in general have been in the news this year, and medical librarians were no exception. The media wanted to hear our opinions on consumer health, health information on the Web, and journal prices. The publications have run the gamut of major media including large city newspapers, the Wall Street Journal, and U.S. News & World Report.

But, more importantly, we have finally broken into the professional publications as well—the Chronicle of Higher Education, Medicine on the Net, Modern Physician, and The Lancet are just a few of the more academic and health care–related publications that have featured interviews with medical librarians or covered medical library issues.

The media have learned that the Medical Library Association and its members can be excellent resources on various issues, and, while not every contact results in a story, as was the case in our response to the NBC report on commercial search services, we do not miss an opportunity to educate reporters about our special skills and our contributions to health care and health information, as well as provide them with possible story lines. And actually, AARP has contacted us about commercial search services, and they are going to run a story that focuses on the importance of medical librarians and Internet sources and how medical librarians can guide people without their going to these very expensive commercial search services. So, we actually did have a follow up.

Ironically, a somewhat frustrating issue for librarians and libraries has given us an entrée into the broader professional literature and turned the spotlight on some of the financial pressures we face in the electronic era.

Scholarly publishing

Scholarly publishing and communication are no longer just a library issue. The crisis in publishing has grabbed the attention of researchers, funding agencies, legislators, and the media. And now the search is on for viable alternative models that provide reasonable, affordable access to the wealth of knowledge being produced by our institutions. MLA has been carefully studying the issues and working with key groups that are monitoring new approaches and alternative models.

MLA is working with the Information Access Alliance and the Open Access Working Group, as well as continuing our affiliation with a number of other organizations including Shared Legal Capabilities.

We have issued our own statement on open access and joined the Open Access Working Group in another statement about the DC Principles.

MLA has also taken action on publishing issues, and we have truly made the Journal of the Medical Library Association one of the possible models for open access. And certainly through the wonderful efforts of the National Library of Medicine, we now have both our current and back issues available to health information professionals worldwide.

However, these are small steps, and a solution to the publishing crisis will not be found quickly. MLA will need to continue to monitor and respond to the situation, and, in order to do this, MLA has formed the Scholarly Publishing Task Force, which will meet for the first time at this meeting. The task force will assess how the trends and policies in scholarly publication directly impact biomedical libraries and recommend new programs, special initiatives, and other activities that MLA should pursue.

As I have talked to publishers, editors, authors, and librarians, I realize that we need to educate ourselves about the publishing industry. This meeting has so many opportunities for learning more about scholarly publishing. To name just a few:

  • Rick Forsman's Janet Doe lecture on Monday will present us with an ecological perspective of the industry.
  • During Wednesday's Morning of Innovation, you can learn more about open access in the program, “Cease the Power: Returning Scientific Publishing to the Academy.”
  • There is an e-journal symposium on Wednesday afternoon that will explore the models for archiving digital journals.
  • You will find a number of section-sponsored programs that deal with different facets of scholarly publishing as well.

However, while global initiatives, advocacy, and scholarly publishing have seemed to consume a lot of our attention this year, I would be very remiss not to mention several other crucial initiatives that have been forging ahead.

Other crucial initiatives

The Task Force on Expert Searching has developed an outstanding position statement that defines expert searching and its components. The successful teleconference this spring underscored the points in the document and gave us insights into how we can revitalize this important skill in ourselves and in our institutions. A symposium on expert searching will be appearing in the Journal of the Medical Library Association.

The Health Information Literacy Task Force has been busy as well. The task force has brought together a number of excellent resources on MLANET and created a brochure. In addition, the task force planned the successful teleconference held last fall, which provided members with an educational opportunity to learn more about health literacy and its role in our profession and in our libraries. MLA's Consumer Health Information Specialization Program remains popular as well.

MLA's Task Force on the Information Specialist in Context (ISIC) continues to explore the informationist concept and its various permutations in biomedical research and health care settings. In order to fully study existing and potential models, the task force has contracted with Vanderbilt University's Eskind Biomedical Library to provide consulting services for the project. The task force is holding an open forum on Monday afternoon at 2:30, if you want to learn more about these initiatives. Another exciting development this year was NLM's creation and funding of informationist training fellowships, and we thank NLM for creating this opportunity to further explore the informationist concept.

As an outgrowth of the discussion of these three initiatives, the MLA Board took on the challenge of putting together a Morning of Innovation program, “Filtering without Fear: The Librarian's Role in Distilling Knowledge,” which will be held on Wednesday morning.

The Center of Research and Education, now known as CORE, is becoming a reality as well. The task force created to develop CORE along with the MLANET editorial board, has created the MLANET Member Professional Toolbox that brings together widely dispersed resources created by, selected by and for, MLA members. Its goal is to provide access to a collection of tools that you can use to continually learn, teach, and sharpen your professional skills. The task force and editorial board have just released this toolbox and invite you to explore it and contribute to it.

These are just a few of our major accomplishments this year. It has been a very busy year. We continue to work on recruitment and retention issues. Watch for a number of programs including an open forum and Morning of Innovation session on this topic at this meeting. And, through your work as MLA members, we continue to support many other activities for you, such as continuing education and professional development, awards and scholarships, and publications. Too many to cover in this morning's program!

Now I need to address a topic that is critically important to the health of our association: the dues increase proposed by the MLA Board.

MLA dues increase

Part of the board's responsibilities is to make sure that the association remains fiscally sound and continues to be responsive to you, our members. We have carefully reviewed priorities, sometimes postponing or canceling new initiatives in order to balance the budget. And after at least two years of careful analysis and serious discussion, the board has decided that a dues increase is needed.

I am not going to go into the many reasons why this is important and needed right now. I hope you have read the information in MLA News and on MLANET that has background information on why the increase is needed and provides data on MLA's financial situation. I urge you to attend the business meetings on Monday and Tuesday and the open forum on Monday afternoon and listen to the discussions and realize why it is important for you to support the dues increase.

While I do not want to make light of the fact that both our personal and institutional budgets may be tight right now and any increases may feel painful, I do want to ask you to step back and put the $15 increase per year into terms of what it might mean for you as a member—in terms of the value you receive from MLA and from the professional group that you work with and what you might have to give up.

I have been trying to do that myself and think of ways I spend money and what I might have to give up to make sure that the profession moves forward. I could support the MLA dues increase by giving up five lattés at the hospital coffee shop, or four of those exciting cafeteria meals, or two paperback books or three (if I could find inexpensive ones), or three video rentals. It does not sound like a lot when you put it in terms like that. I do ask you to think about it in your own context as well.

By voting for the dues increase, you will enable MLA to continue to support the programs that you value, while ensuring that MLA will continue to be responsive to emerging issues and needs and truly have a futuro magnífico.

Again, thank you for the honor and opportunity to be president of MLA. I thank you for your support over the past year and your continuing leadership and participation in MLA.

And most of all I want to thank you for not only seizing but continuously demonstrating the power of our value.

Thank you so very much.

At the conclusion of her address, President Thibodeau, on behalf of the association and the Board of Directors, formally thanked and recognized the MLA headquarters staff for their service to the organization.

PLENARY SESSIONS

I, May 23, 2004: The John P. McGovern Lecture

Introduction: Gary Freiburger, associate chair 2004 NPC, and Arizona Health Sciences Library, University of Arizona–Tuscon.

Geographic Illiteracy and National Security: Harm J. de Blij, Department of Geography, Michigan State University–East Lansing.

II, May 24, 2004: The Janet Doe Lecture

Introduction: Freida O. Weise, FMLA, Laurel, Maryland.

Life and Death on the Coral Reef: An Ecological Perspective on Scholarly Publishing in the Health Sciences: Rick B. Forsman, FMLA, Denison Memorial Library, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center–Denver.

III, May 26, 2004: Plenary 3

Introduction: MJ Tooey, chair 2004 NPC, and Health Sciences and Human Services Library, University of Maryland–Baltimore.

Innovation and Medicine in an Era of Accelerating Information Technologies: Ray Kurzweil, Kurzweil Technologies, Wellesley Hills, Massachusetts.

BUSINESS MEETING I

Monday, May 24, 2004

President Thibodeau convened the first business meeting of 2004 at 10:30 a.m. by asking voting members to acquire voting paddles if needed and seat themselves so that voting paddles would be visible for counting. President Thibodeau introduced Carla J. Funk, CAE, executive director of MLA. Ms. Funk introduced the MLA Board of Directors: President Patricia Thibodeau; President-elect Joanne G. Marshall, FMLA; Immediate Past President Linda Watson; Treasurer Neil Rambo; Chapter Council Liaison Linda Garr Markwell; Section Council Liaison Norma F. Funkhouser, and Directors Nancy W. Clemmons, Diana J. Cunningham, Ruth Holst, Rosalind K. Lett, Michelynn McKnight, and Gerald Perry; appointed officers Linné Girouard, sergeant-at-arms, and Lucretia W. McClure, FMLA, parliamentarian. Ms. Funk also introduced a professional parliamentarian, Peola H. McCaskill, and Suzanne F. Grefsheim, chair of the Bylaws Committee. She continued by introducing the editors of JMLA and MLA News and the MEDLIB-L coordinator, and she recognized Scott Garrison, the outgoing MLANET editor, for his six years of service. Melissa Just was introduced as the board's appointment to that position. Next, Ms. Funk acknowledged the roles of MLA chapters, sections, and special interest groups (SIGs). Chairs of the organizations were asked to stand and be recognized. She then asked committee and task force chairs and MLA representatives to allied organizations to stand and be recognized.

President Thibodeau returned to the podium and asked for a moment of silence for the following members of MLA who died in the past year: Daniel Craig Horne, Emma Lue Kopp, Jackie L. Kuhl-Ashton, Mildred Crowe Langner, FMLA, Ruth C. Monahon, Leslie T. Morton, Bob Murphy, Kathryn (Katy) W. Nesbit, James (Jim) Hilliard Parrish, Lenora K. Shytman, and Barbara Van Brimmer.

President Thibodeau then asked for the sergeant-at-arms to verify that the required quorum of 250 voting members required for transaction of business was present. There being 340 members present, President Thibodeau asked Secretary Ruth Holst to move adoption of the Rules of the Assembly. The motion was made, voted on, and adopted with no discussion.

Ruth Holst: A printed copy of the Official Program as proposed by the Board of Directors is in the hands of each registrant for the meeting. The agenda for the 2004 business meeting is found on page 33 of the Official Program. By direction of the Board of Directors, I move that the agenda for the 2004 business meetings of the Medical Library Association be adopted.

President Thibodeau called the question, there was no discussion, and the agenda was adopted.

President Thibodeau: In November of 2003, ballots for MLA's election of 2004/05 officers, Board of Directors, and Nominating Committee members were mailed to all voting members of the Medical Library Association. One thousand four hundred and forty-one countable ballots were returned. The ad hoc Election Task Force, chaired by Irene Wood, counted the ballots at MLA headquarters on January 14, 2004. The election results were announced in the February 2004 issue of the MLA News and our complete election results, including vote totals, are published in the MLA Annual Report 2003/04, which is available on MLANET. Following are the election results: Mary Joan (MJ) Tooey was elected president-elect; Dixie Alford Jones was elected for a three-year term to the Board of Directors; Faith A. Meakin was elected for a three-year term to the Board of Directors. The following were elected to the Nominating Committee: Tom Flemming, Lynn M. Fortney, Mark E. Funk, Stephen J. Greenberg, Gale G. Hannigan, Elizabeth Irish, Carol G. Jenkins, FMLA, Julia K. Kochi, and Mary Mylenki.

The next business was to consider amendments to the Special Rules of Order and the bylaws. President Thibodeau explained that over the past few years, the Board of Directors had approved motions that impact MLA's Special Rules of Order and the bylaws. Because the cost of amending these documents is high, as a cost-containment measure, the board recommended waiting until there were several proposed amendments to present to the membership for a vote.

President Thibodeau: At its September 2003 meeting, the Board of Directors approved for presentation to and passage by the membership motions that address the following revisions to the Special Rules of Order: the issue of chapter and section dissolution, the rights and privileges of student memberships, and categories of active voting and nonvoting membership to make the wording consistent with the proposed new definition for student membership.

The Board of Directors also approved for presentation to and passage by the membership, motions that address the following bylaws revisions: Changing the name of the Bulletin of the Medical Library Association (BMLA) to the Journal of the Medical Library Association (JMLA) and removing references to the managing editor of books in the MLA Bylaws and changing relevant sections of the MLA Bylaws to allow for electronic voting.

The board also recommended notifying the membership that the proviso to article XIII, section 3, should be dropped from the bylaws. The proviso deals with how staggered elections were conducted during the transition from alternate to representative-elect positions on Section Council. Now that the transition is complete, the proviso is no longer necessary.

Upon further direction of the board, the Bylaws Committee and professional parliamentarian recommended that the amendments to the Special Rules of Order and the bylaws be presented to the membership in the March 2004 issue of the MLA News in compliance with section 9.B. of the Special Rules of Order and article XIV, section 1.B., of the bylaws.

President Thibodeau announced that reprints of the March issue of the MLA News were distributed by tellers and additional copies were available to aid the discussion.

President Thibodeau: Our first point of order is discussion and amendment of the proposed amendments to the Special Rules of Order. Section 9.B. of the Special Rules of Order states:

Upon recommendation by the Board of Directors (or petition by a minimum of 150 voting members), Special Rules of Order may be amended by a two-thirds vote at the Annual Meeting. Notice of proposed amendments shall be sent to each voting member at least nine weeks before the date of the meeting.

Madam Secretary, has the MLA membership been given proper notice of the proposed amendments to the Special Rules of Order?

Ms. Holst: Yes, Madam President, the proposed amendments to the Special Rules of Order were presented to the membership in the March issue of the MLA News, more than nine weeks before the date of this meeting.

President Thibodeau: Thank you, Ruth. For the sake of time, if there are no objections from the floor, I will ask the membership to suspend the rule to read all the Special Rules of Order. If there is no objection to doing this, Suzanne Grefsheim, Bylaws Committee chair, will move that the amendments to the Special Rules of Order be adopted. This motion puts the amendments on the floor for discussion and amendment. The chair will restate the motion. We will then consider the Special Rules of Order amendments in a series of 1 through 10. First, amendment 1 will be moved and considered, followed by amendments 2 through 10, as published in the March issue of the MLA News.

For the sake of time, if there is no objection, amendments requiring editorial changes that specifically relate to a particular revision such as changing the names of the BMLA to the JMLA will be considered in a block.

President Thibodeau then summarized the amendments:

  • Amendment 1 addresses the issue of chapter and section dissolution.
  • Amendment 2 redefines the rights and privileges of student membership.
  • Amendment 3 moves the category of student members from section 8.C., Subclasses of Non-voting Membership, to section 7.E., Categories of Active Voting Membership.
  • Amendments 4 through 7 revised the language of 7.A., B., C., and D. for consistency with the new wording of student members.
  • Amendments 8 through 10 revised the language of section 8.A., B., and D. to make it consistent with the new wording of student in section 8.C. Student has been moved to section 7.E. as provided in Amendment 3.

Before opening the floor for discussion, President Thibodeau reminded the membership of the Rules of Assembly. Discussion is limited to two minutes per speaker. No speaker may have the floor twice on the same question until all who wish to speak have spoken. A member wishing to speak a second time is limited to one minute. The timekeepers time all discussion, and a raised paddle signifies when the two-minute limit is up. Speakers may not yield the floor to another person. The chair recognizes speakers. Speakers should approach the microphone and state their name, institution, city, and state. President Thibodeau then asked if there was any objection to suspending the rule that all proposed amendments be read. There being none, the amendments to the Special Rules of Order were not read, and the amendments were considered in a series.

Suzanne Grefsheim: By direction of the Bylaws Committee, I move that this assembly amend section 5.D. of the Special Rules of Order by establishing a new subsection that addresses the issue of chapter and section dissolution. This is amendment 1 of your handout.

President Thibodeau: It is moved and seconded to amend section 5.D. of the Special Rules of Order by establishing a new subsection that addresses the issue of chapter and section dissolution as read by Suzanne.

Ms. Grefsheim explained the rationale for the amendment. In 2000, the MLA Board of Directors approved adding new language to the model bylaws for use by chapters and sections of the Medical Library Association that addresses the issue of chapter and section dissolution. The Bylaws Committee referred the recommendation of the professional parliamentarian that the Board of Directors also approve for presentation to the MLA membership new language that addresses this issue in the Special Rules of Order. This recommendation was made, because the MLA Bylaws and Special Rules of Order serve as the prototype on which the model bylaws were developed. The board approved this recommendation with the wording that is found in amendment 1.

President Thibodeau again noted that there was a motion on the floor to amend section 5.D. She asked for discussion, and, there being none, it was called for a vote. Votes were counted, and, with two-thirds of the votes in the affirmative, the revision was adopted.

Ms. Grefsheim: By direction of the Bylaws Committee, I move that this assembly amend section 8.C. to redefine the rights and privileges of student membership. This is amendment 2 in your handout.

President Thibodeau repeated the motion and asked for rationale.

Ms. Grefsheim: In May 2002, the Membership Category Review Survey was conducted by the Membership Committee on MLANET. This was a direct result of the Membership Committee's charge to review MLA's membership categories and recommend any changes or enhancements in time for the 2002 board meeting. The Membership Committee recommended that student membership be expanded to an unlimited time with valid student identification. In addition, the committee recommended that all students, regardless of degree program, be eligible for student membership in MLA. In making these recommendations, the committee recognized that other similar associations—including American Library Association (ALA), Special Libraries Association (SLA), and American Association of Law Libraries (AALL)—do not limit student membership to a defined period of time. Student membership in these associations is based on the provision of valid student identification. By expanding the eligibility for student membership, MLA is expanding its revenue base. Also with the emphasis on recruitment and retention of librarians and medical librarians in particular, the committee believes that MLA should not restrict membership only to those individuals enrolled in schools of library and information sciences. The committee believes that it is time to consider recruiting members and future medical librarians from other professional degree programs such as informatics professionals.

President Thibodeau thanked Ms. Grefsheim and asked for discussion.

Virginia Saha, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio: Does that mean that someone who has been a practicing, full dues-paying member who then enrolls in another degree program with a valid student ID reverts to student membership?

President Thibodeau: That is my understanding, yes.

Mark Funk, Weill Cornell Medical Library, New York: I think that is incorrect, Pat. If you look at the definition of a regular member, a regular member is any person who works or has worked in a health information–related environment. That is a regular member. So, I think anybody who has been a regular member cannot revert to a student membership.

President Thibodeau asked if anyone on the board would take the question but there was no response.

President Thibodeau: I believe the intent of this change was, in fact—board members correct me—that, in fact, somebody who was a practicing librarian, regular member, but then decided to go and pursue a degree, like a PhD or another degree, could slide into the student membership during that period of time. That was my understanding.

Female Voice: Hi. It is my understanding having been a practicing librarian who became a student while still practicing, that this is an option. If, for instance, I had decided to take the student membership instead of the regular membership, I would not have been a member of AHIP anymore.

Faith Meakin, University of Florida–Gainesville: I think in the old wording, Pat, it did say a member who returns to school for further education may qualify for student membership for additional two-year period after having held a voting membership for at least one year. That is not included in the new definition.

President Thibodeau: Right. It is not. It is broader, where, therefore, I think it is allowable. Suzanne?

Ms. Grefsheim: When the Bylaws Committee reviewed this, it was not our intention to take away the rights that were already granted.

President Thibodeau: Right. That is correct. Somebody has to apply for this and say that they want this. Any other discussion?

There being none, President Thibodeau repeated the motion and called for a vote. The motion was adopted, and Ms. Grefsheim was asked to continue.

Ms. Grefsheim: By order of the Bylaws Committee, I move that this assembly approve that the category of student members be moved from section 8.C., Subclasses of Non-voting Membership, to section 7.E., Categories of Active Voting Membership, using the new definition of student member provided in amendment 2. This motion will require editorial changes in the numbering of subsequent sections of section 7, Categories of Active Voting Membership, and section 8, Subclasses of Non-voting Membership. This is amendment 3 in your handout.

President Thibodeau: It is moved and seconded that the category of student members be moved from section 8.C., Subclasses of Non-voting Membership, to section 7.E., Categories of Active Voting Membership, using the new definition of student member provided in amendment 2. Suzanne will provide rationale.

Ms. Grefsheim: Recognizing that student members represent the future of the association, the board approved a motion granting student members voting rights. In adopting the motion, the board reaffirmed the importance of recruitment and retention to the profession and the importance of making student members more inclusive and engaged in the work of the association.

President Thibodeau repeated the motion, called for discussion (there was none), called for a vote, and the motion passed.

President Thibodeau: Amendments 4 through 10 were presented to you as individual amendments in the March issue of the MLA News. The purpose of these amendments is to revise sections 7 and 8 of the Special Rules of Order for consistency of language with the new definition of student membership and to renumber the subsections to accommodate moving the category of student members from section 8.C. to section 7.E. In the interest of time, if there is no objection, we will consider amendments 4 through 10 that were published in your handouts in a block.

President Thibodeau further explained: You will be voting on amendments 4 through 10 to revise the language of 7.A., Regular Member; section 7.B., Life Member; section 7.C., Fellow; section 7.D., Emeritus Member; section 8.A., Affiliate Member; section 8.B., International Member; and section 8.D., Honorary Member. These amendments allow the association to revise these rules for consistency of language with the new wording of student and to renumber relevant sections to accommodate moving the category of student from section 8.C. to section 7.E.

There was no discussion, a vote was called, and the amendments passed.

President Thibodeau: Thank you. This concludes our discussion of the Special Rules of Order. Our second point of order is discussion and amendment of the proposed amendments to the bylaws. Article XIV, sections 1.B. and 2 of the bylaws state:

Notice of proposed amendments recommended by the Board of Directors (or petitioned by a minimum of 150 voting members at least sixteen weeks before the start of the next annual meeting) shall be sent to each voting member at least nine weeks before the date of the meeting. The notice shall indicate the time and place of the next annual meeting where the proposed amendments will be considered. Opportunity shall be given at the annual meeting for debating and amending any properly proposed amendments to any part of the bylaws.

Madam Secretary, has the MLA membership been given proper notice of the proposed amendments to the bylaws?

Ms. Holst: Yes, Madam President, the proposed amendments to the bylaws were presented to the membership in the March issue of the MLA News, more than nine weeks before the date of this meeting. Notice of the time and place of the annual meeting discussion was also provided in the article as required by the bylaws.

President Thibodeau: Thank you, Ruth. For the sake of time, if there is no objection from the floor, I will ask the membership to suspend the rule to read all the bylaws. If this meets with your approval, Suzanne Grefsheim, Bylaws Committee chair, will move that the amendments to the bylaws be adopted.

This motion puts the amendments on the floor for discussion and amendment. The chair will restate the motion. We will then consider the bylaws amendments in a series of 11 through 21. First, amendment 11 will be moved and considered followed by amendments 12 through 21 as published in the March issue of the MLA News. Once again for the sake of time, if there is no objection, amendments requiring editorial changes that specifically relate to a particular revision such as changing the name of the BMLA to the JMLA will be considered in a block.

In summary:

  • Amendments 11 through 13 relate to changing the name of the Bulletin of the Medical Library Association to the Journal of the Medical Library Association and to removing references to the managing editor of books.
  • Amendment 14 allows for the renumbering of sections 5.E. and F. to D. and E. due to the removal of 5.D., the managing editor of books.
  • Amendments 15 through 20 relate to changes to allow for electronic distribution of ballots.
  • Amendment 21 removes the proviso to article XII, section 3, of the bylaws. The proviso is no longer needed now that the transition from alternate to representative-elect positions on the Section Council has been completed.

Before opening the floor for discussion, President Thibodeau reiterated the rules for discussion. She then asked if there were any objections to suspending the rule that all the proposed amendments be read. There were no objections, so the Bylaws Committee chair was asked to continue.

Ms. Grefsheim: By direction of the Bylaws Committee, I move that the this assembly amend article IV, section 4, by changing the name of the Bulletin of the Medical Library Association to the Journal of the Medical Library Association and to remove references to the managing editor of books. These changes are published as amendment 11 in your handout.

President Thibodeau repeated the motion and asked for rationale.

Ms. Grefsheim: In 2001, the board announced a task force to consider a name change for the Bulletin of the Medical Library Association. The task force was charged to investigate name changes to official publications of professional associations, to outline the pros and cons of changing the name of the BMLA, and to prepare a recommendation with reasons for a change. In preparing this report and the recommendation that MLA change the name of the BMLA, the task force studied trends in the naming of publications, particularly publications of library and health professional associations that had changed from bulletin to journal. The report noted that:

  • A professional association needs a publication with a name that reflects the true character of the official journal.
  • The Encarta World English Dictionary defines bulletin as a newsletter, news broadcast, and official news statement.
  • The use of bulletin may mislead promotion and tenure review committees about the true nature of the BMLA, especially committees with campus-wide representation.
  • Campus and hospital publications that list faculty or staff publications have no footnotes to explain that BMLA is an excellent, peer-reviewed journal, not an insignificant newsletter.
  • And librarians provide copies of curriculum vitae when working on collaborative grants with nonlibrary faculty. Nonlibrarian reviewers could discount the publications in BMLA, because it sounds non-substantive.
    In accepting the report of the task force, the board approved a recommendation that the name of MLA's quarterly serial publication be changed to Journal of the Medical Library Association, replacing the title Bulletin of the Medical Library Association, effective with the January 2002 issue.

The second part of this amendment addresses removing the managing editor of books from the bylaws. Prior to the year 2000, the managing editor of books was an appointed MLA official who had responsibility for facilitating the publication of books published under the name of the association. During the 1999/2000 association year, MLA entered into a new copublishing partnership with Neal-Schuman Publishers, who negated the need for this volunteer position. Under this agreement, the Books Panel reviews and approves manuscripts that are then forwarded to Neal-Schuman who manages all phases of publishing and production, including contract negotiation, project management, copy editing, composition, proofreading, and printing. When there is a need to obtain external content reviewers for a particular manuscript, the current Books Panel chair seeks a volunteer from the Books Panel to serve as the peer-review manager. Removing the managing editor of books from the bylaws brings the document in compliance with current practice.

President Thibodeau thanked Ms. Grefsheim and called for discussion.

Melissa Just, University of Southern California–Los Angeles: The program lists both the MLANET editor and the coordinator of MEDLIB-L as elected officials, and I just wanted to make sure that that was not synonymous with appointed officers. I am sorry, appointed officials, not synonymous with appointed officers, to be included in this section. It is amendment 11.

Ms. Grefsheim: I think this only applies to the appointed official managing editor of books. It does not apply to any of the other appointed officials.

Janis Brown, University of Southern California–Los Angeles: I guess our question was, since this article seems to indicate all the appointed officers, isn't the MLANET editor also one of those officers and should that….”

Ms. Grefsheim: So, should we amend the bylaws to include MLANET editor?

Ms. Brown: Right, or also the MEDLIB editor, list coordinator.

Ms. Grefsheim: Since it takes quite a long time to amend the bylaws, I think we will refer that to the current Bylaws Committee and ask them to add the MLANET editor to the list of appointed officials or appointed officers.

President Thibodeau: Yes. That is a good suggestion.

Ms. Grefsheim: Thank you.

President Thibodeau called for further discussion. There was none, a vote was called, and the revisions to article IV, section 4, of the bylaws were passed. President Thibodeau then reminded the group that all of the bylaws amendment changes would go before the entire MLA membership for a full vote.

President Thibodeau: Amendments 12 through 14 will now be considered. They were presented to you as individual amendments in the March issue of the MLA News. The purpose of these amendments is to revise article IV, sections 5.B. and D., to change the name of the Bulletin of the Medical Library Association to the Journal of the Medical Library Association and to strike out references to the managing editor of books. In the interest of time, if there is no objection, we will consider amendments 12 through 14 that were published in your handouts in a block. Hearing no objection, amendments 12 through 14 will be considered in a block. The floor is open for discussion.

There being no discussion President Thibodeau repeated the motion and called for a vote. With a majority in the affirmative, the amendment passed.

Ms. Grefsheim was asked to continue: Okay. I think this is an amendment that will affect many sections and chapters, so pay attention. By direction of the Bylaws Committee, I move that this assembly amend article III, section 2.B., by replacing the word “mailing” with the word “distribution” as published in amendment 15 of the handouts. This will require editorial changes to replace the word “mailing” with the word “distribution” and other relevant language changes wherever they appear in the bylaws.

President Thibodeau repeated the motion and asked for rationale.

Ms. Grefsheim: Over the last several years, the association and its units have increasingly utilized electronic technology to communicate and conduct business. Recognizing that this is a cost-effective and efficient mechanism, the Board of Directors recommends that the membership amend the bylaws to allow for the electronic distribution of ballots. Paper ballots will continue to be sent to voting members who do not have email and Internet access.

President Thibodeau called for discussion, then repeated the motion, and called for a vote. There was a majority in the affirmative, and the revision was adopted. She remarked that this change would really help sections, because the change supersedes the model bylaws. Ms. Grefsheim pointed out that sections will need to change their individual bylaws.

President Thibodeau: Amendments 16 through 20 were presented to you as individual amendments in the March issue of the MLA News. The purpose of these amendments is to make editorial changes in the bylaws to allow for the electronic distribution of ballots. Specifically:

  • Amendment 16 strikes out the word “mail” in article V, section 1.B.
  • Amendment 17 replaces the word “mailed” with “distributed” and strikes out the words “without being opened” in article V, section 6.A.
  • Amendment 18 strikes out the word “mail” in article XIV, section 1.A.
  • Amendment 19 replaces the word “mailed” with the word “distributed” wherever it appears in article XIV, section 3.
  • Amendment 20 strikes out the word “mail” in article XIV, section 4.

In the interest of time, if there is no objection, we will consider amendments 16 through 20 in a block. Hearing no objection, amendments 16 through 20 will be considered in a block. The floor is open for discussion.

Barbara Slater, University of California–San Diego, LaJolla: Regarding amendment 17, the last sentence reads, “Ballots for members outside of the continental United States and Canada shall be airmailed.” Why the distinction between distribution versus mailed versus airmailed?

President Thibodeau: I believe it has to do with time limits of the arrival of the ballots to countries not in the continental United States, so, because sometimes it is just a long delay, and it could literally take weeks if they are not airmailed. So I believe that is the rationale, but I will let Carla address that if she has more information. Is that the rationale?

Carla J. Funk, CAE: That is the explanation for that part of it. But is that your question?

Ms. Slater: I guess I would hate to be prescriptive and negate the possibility of distributing their ballots electronically if that is really the….

Ms. Funk: Yes. That is what I thought. I thought that was the part of your question. We left that in there. I think that we can do that and maybe do a dual thing. We are having increasing problems with some of the emails not being received and being filtered out and all sorts of things like that. And that is why I think in the international realm, some people do not have access to email. And, for right now, we thought maybe that would be the best way. We can certainly change that as time goes on, as we get experience with doing it in this country. As you know, ALA is doing their first electronic election right now, and we are going to learn from them a little bit, too. So we are kind of segueing into this, I would say.

President Thibodeau: So I guess it does not prevent us from sending email to international members. It just enables us, if there are difficulties, to use airmail still. Is that a correct summary?

Ms. Slater: The wording says “shall be mailed by airmail.” I, just as difficult as it is to….

President Thibodeau: We will do it. We will do it.

Ms. Slater: …change the bylaws, I'd rather be less prescriptive than more.

President Thibodeau: We can bring an amendment to the floor. Would you like to bring up an amendment? And let me find my process for doing that, but we can amend these bylaws here on the floor, if they are just amendments to the existing ones. The person who is recommending the amendment will need to fill out a triplicate motion form. You will need to write it out. The tellers give the copy to me and to the secretary. And then we wil read the proposed amendment to the motion, and then we will open discussion on that proposed amendment, close the discussion, and then vote.

Ms. Grefsheim: Can I—would it—this is a dialogue here.

President Thibodeau: That is fine.

Ms. Grefsheim: Would it be possible for the managing editor of the MLANET to do the same thing and get that done now as well, so it is included in the vote?

President Thibodeau: In other words, can we backtrack on a motion we already voted on and amend it?

Lucretia W. McClure, FMLA: No.

President Thibodeau: No. Our parliamentarian says no. So, what we could do is refer both motions, both issues to—back to the bylaws. Since we already have one bylaws issue going to the Bylaws Committee, we can add the other one to it or we can do an amendment here. Which would you prefer? People who raised the issue?

Ms. Slater: How long will this process take?

President Thibodeau: I have to probably have the motion up here, so if you come—probably if you go ahead and make your motion, if you scribble it down really quickly, get it here, and then we can do the rest of the paperwork in transit. How about that?

Ms. Slater: I would like to change then the word “airmail” to “distributed.”

President Thibodeau: Okay.

Ms. Slater: Or remove the sentence entirely.

President Thibodeau: Well, one suggestion is that we “may” distribute it by airmail.

Ms. Slater: Well, then I do not—“may”—certainly would be all right as well.

President Thibodeau: And we know there are going to be future changes. We know this is not set. We do not know what balloting may look like in the future, so there may be other—other changes we will have to do in the future as the technology changes. So we can do something now…

Ms. Slater: Okay. I would prefer not then to submit this motion and continue discussion on the rest of the amendments.

President Thibodeau: So you are with—so you are not making the motion? Okay. But we will refer this to the Bylaws Committee. Jo Anne?

Jo Anne Boorkman, FMLA, University of California– Davis: Why doesn't distributed as a word itself exclude airmail if that is the appropriate way? Distributed does not indicate how it is being delivered. It just says distributed. So it could be—there could be multiple ways. Is distributed only to mean emailed? Because that is not what it says to me. And if you strike the airmail, that does not preclude having the ballots distributed in any appropriate way to get in a timely to the membership. I mean, that is how I would interpret it, but maybe that is wrong.

Susanne Gerding Bader, Baylor University School of Nursing, Dallas, Texas: My comment has to do with that, too. Perhaps just say expedited distribution. That also would accommodate that time factor, and it does not get specific to allow for we don't know where this could go.

President Thibodeau: Okay. We still need a formal motion to amend it on the floor here today; otherwise, it goes to the Bylaws Committee and goes through the whole process. Tom?

Tom Flemming, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada: I would prefer that we proceed with the amendment, which says to strike the sentence entirely, because the concern I have is that if we continue to allow email distribution as has been suggested from the podium and to prescribe that ballots be mailed to those members outside Canada and the United States, it sounds to me as though we have the potential difficulty of determining whether two ballots have been received from the same member. And that just does not seem to be worth the—worth the hassle. Why don't we just proceed with the amendment to strike the last sentence in the amendment 17 as it stands and to accept Jo Anne Boorkman's description of the word distribution which means that we have options in distributing “things.”

President Thibodeau: Again, to have that happen, I have to have a formal amendment to the motion, which means pulling out the motion form. So, okay. Good. Thank you.

Forms were distributed to Ms. Boorkman for writing out the proposed amendment.

President Thibodeau: All right. Any other discussion on this point, while she is completing the motion form? This is why bylaws are so important. It is nice to have many eyes take a look at these things to streamline them. So thank you for the comments. Don't leave. While we are waiting for the motion, I really want to thank all of you who attended this business meeting. Sometimes bylaws do seem kind of trivial, but they are very, very important. As we see today, it can affect how we communicate with members and how we conduct business. So I thank you for attending. It is so important that we have a quorum here to do this kind of business. So thank you very much.

Ms. Holst: Do you want her to read it?

President Thibodeau: Actually, you can bring it here and I will read it. All right. I think we are ready. This is the motion. It has been moved to remove the sentence “ballots outside the United States and Canada shall be airmailed” from article V, section 6.A., of amendment 17. Do I have a second for that motion?

Mr. Flemming: Second.

President Thibodeau: Tom Flemming has seconded. The floor is now open for discussion on this amendment. Are you ready to vote? All those in favor of this amendment to section—to—this amendment to amendment 17, article V, section 6.A., which removes the sentence “ballots outside the United States and Canada shall be airmailed,” please stand and raise your paddles.

The amendment from the floor passed.

President Thibodeau: Thank you. Now, we need to go back and approve the other amendments that were in that block. That would be amendment 16, amendment 18, amendment 19, and amendment 20. If there are no objections, we will take those amendments as a block. Any other discussion on those amendments?

Female Voice: Actually, you have to approve the amendment 17 while you approve the amendments.

President Thibodeau: I have to do 17, too? Okay. So we will do all of them. They are back in a block then. Only one is amended. Are we ready to vote? You will be voting on amendments 16 through 20 to make editorial changes in the bylaws to allow for the electronic distribution of ballots.

President Thibodeau repeated the gist of each amendment, called for a vote, and the changes passed.

President Thibodeau: There being a majority in the affirmative, you are recommending the membership adopt the revisions to article v, sections 1.b. and 6.a., and article XIV, sections 1.A, 3, and 4.

In 1999, the membership adopted amendments to the bylaws that reduced the size of Section Council by eliminating the elected position of alternate and implementing a new structure based on the representative-elect model and approving procedures for appointing proxies for voting purposes. To facilitate a smooth transition to the new structure, the membership adopted a proviso to article XII, section 3, of the bylaws that provided an adjustment in the election schedule. This allowed for continuity between the councils and for work on council activities and projects over a three-year transition period. The transition is complete, and the proviso is no longer needed. The professional parliamentarian advises us that removing the proviso does not require a vote. Since the substance of the proviso has been fulfilled and is completed, it can automatically be removed. Therefore, if there is no objection, we will not take formal action on amendment 21 as published in the March issue of the MLA News. Is there any objection to not introducing a motion to remove the proviso from the bylaws? In other words, you do not have to stand up and down.

President Thibodeau: Thank you. Hearing no objection, we will not take up a motion, and the proviso to article XII, section 2, of the bylaws will be removed.

This brings discussion of our bylaws amendments to a close. The amendments and a summary of your discussion will be forwarded to all voting members for their consideration and vote later this year.

I want to thank all the individuals who spent many long hours working on these issues. I would especially like to thank the Bylaws Committee, the Board of Directors, and the headquarters staff for all of your outstanding work on behalf of the association. If these members are present here today, please stand and be recognized.

I also want to thank the members here today who shared their bylaws knowledge and helped us refine these today.

President Thibodeau continued the business meeting by calling upon Treasurer Neil Rambo.

Neil Rambo: Thank you, Pat. I am here to report on MLA's financial health and frankly to ask you to support the proposed dues increase. You may ask why you should care about MLA's financial health or why you should pay higher dues when your personal finances and your institution's budget are under increasing pressure. Well, no one likes or wants to pay higher dues. I may be treasurer, but I am not crazy enough to want to do that.

But we as members, and we as members and stakeholders in MLA, need to care because a financially weak MLA will not be effective in serving us, its members. MLA will not have the resources to do the things we, the members, expect it to deliver on our behalf. MLA will not be able to develop new programs and improve existing ones.

The elected Board of Directors has a fiduciary responsibility, which means that the board must ensure MLA can pay its expenses. This means MLA may not spend money it does not have for priorities and programs. MLA's financial health impacts the benefits you receive now and in the future.

So what is the state of MLA's financial health? It is sound, but it has an unsustainable trend that has become clear.

Last year in San Diego, then Treasurer Mark Funk reported that the board would be considering a dues increase. By the way, just to take sort of a straw poll here, how many of you at this meeting remember the report from last year's meeting?

Having sort of anticipated that, I was diabolically clever enough to get all the bylaws stuff before my report. So you've all been hypnotized to have no memory of the prior report, and you'll walk out of here and turn to the person next to you and say “the report I just heard was the cleverest, wittiest thing I have ever experienced at an MLA meeting.” And you will not remember my preliminary remarks at all having admitted this to you.

Mr. Rambo then referred back to his report and slides.

Mr. Rambo: So as you can see, we have got a line going in the wrong direction. We have had a surplus for three straight years, but it has been steadily declining. In 2001, you can see a $63,000 ending balance declining to $24,700 and, in this last year completed in December, a mere $4,475.

The 2004 budget will put MLA in deficit for the first time since 2000. We ended last year with a $4,000 plus balance. And while welcome, this amount is not sufficient to fund new programs or erase the planned 2004 budget deficit.

To go into more detail about the 2003 results: the general operating fund earned revenues of $2.69 million, which was a bit under budget and 1% higher than in 2000. Expenses were $2.685 million, also a bit under budget and 2% higher than in 2002. And the difference between the two gives us our $4,000 plus balance.

The past year saw increased revenue from membership lists, rentals, display ads, and exhibits. However, we also saw increased expenses for exhibits security, annual meeting audiovisual equipment you can see on display here and in the large ballroom, and corporate insurance.

Annual meeting revenues continue to provide over one-third of total revenues for the association. The biggest revenue source is from vendor exhibits and advertising. Historically, MLA meetings in Washington, DC, have high attendance and, as we heard at the beginning of this business session, this meeting has surpassed the prior high water mark in 1995, when this meeting was last held here. So, that is good financially.

Annual meetings continue to evolve to incorporate new technologies and new session formats. And these improvements require added funds.

Due to the drop in the stock market, MLA's investments suffered a 12% loss over 2001 and 2002. The drop reduced the association's reserves and lessened MLA's ability to fund special projects and programs.

Fortunately, 2003 was better with investments earning a return of 8.6%. Overall, investments are a bit higher than they were in 1999, just before the tech bubble burst.

As far as membership goes in 2003, MLA recruited almost 500 new members, but that was still 100 less than the year before. However, in 2003, there were more total members than there were in the year before, about 4,590 compared to 4,450 the year before, indicating that our retention rate was higher in 2003 than in 2002. Our individual memberships increased in all but the international category.

The MLA Board of Directors continues to be sensitive to the financial hardships many members face. In thinking through that, MLA now offers seven discounted dues categories, which has enabled 938 members to save money in dues. This represents over 25% of all individual members.

How well is dues revenue holding up? As you can see from this chart, this shows that in 2003, dues provided roughly the same level of revenue as it did twelve years ago in 1992. Part of the reason for this is the introduction and shift by members into the new discounted dues categories. These categories are effective in helping add and retain members. MLA has about the same number of members as it had in 2000.

As far as dues revenue goes, this chart shows how dues are declining relative to non-dues sources and how non-dues sources have increased to support association programs. Declining dues revenues pose a challenge to balance the budget while supporting current activities and funding new objectives.

In 1997 and 2000, dues provided 26% of total revenues. By this year, 2004, that percentage had dropped to 22% which means that over three-quarters of association revenue, 78% of all revenues, are earned from non-dues sources such as advertising, exhibit sales, and mailing list rentals.

Non-dues revenues, it should be kept in mind, go up and down according to market forces. Each change has an impact on the bottom line and MLA's ability to fund essential ongoing and new programs. The figure shows how the percentage of dues revenues versus non-dues revenue has declined since 2000, increasing MLA's reliance on more volatile, non-dues sources of revenue.

For 2004, you see here the comparison of revenue and expenses and a slight plan deficit. Last December, the board approved the 2004 budget which, as I mentioned earlier, has a planned deficit of $25,000 on revenues planned for $2.912 million and expenses of $2.937 million.

The deficit, which will be MLA's first since 2000, will be funded by reserve funds. A summary of the budget was published in the April issue of the MLA News and on MLANET.

The 2004 deficit provides funding for ambitious new strategies such as a consultant to work with the board, headquarters, and the task force on the information specialist in context to develop new roles for medical librarians.

The budget projects a gain of 148 new members. And to accomplish this increase, funding is provided for the Membership Committee's campaign to reach lapsed members and for surveys of non-renewing members.

Other new initiatives supported by this budget include conversion of classroom-based CE courses to Web-based learning, development of leadership training opportunities, expansion of MLANET features and functions including online voting and free Website hosting for sections, provision of quality assessment tools for hospital libraries through expansion of the benchmarking network activities, and support of the LibQUAL+ initiative through the Association of Research Libraries. All these things take added funding.

The budget also relies on cost-cutting and increasing revenues from non-dues sources such as advertising, annual meeting exhibit sales, and sales of publications, as I have mentioned previously. Expenses were reduced in supplies, telephone, photocopier equipment, postage, printing, and Internet connectivity, and expenses were contained in governance, travel, personnel, and payroll.

When the dues were last increased five years ago, here is a summary of some of the benefits that were seen from that particular increase:

  • enhancements to MLANET, including the online directory,
  • electronic versions of the Journal of the Medical Library Association and MLA News,
  • an enhanced search engine,
  • purchase of a new server to host section and chapter Websites,
  • online job ads, annual meeting abstracts and program content, and other registration and renewal services,
  • the Benchmarking Network to help our members learn more about benchmarking, compare data, establish best practices, and identify and work with a benchmarking partner.
  • the mentoring database and brochure development to enable experienced librarians to foster the next generation of MLA leaders,
  • advocacy for the profession through increased collaboration with other library associations and organizations on issues such as open access, fair use, and electronic publishing,
  • development of the Advocacy Toolbox and development of other member advocacy tools,
  • expansion of the Educational Clearinghouse to provide information about MLA approved CE opportunities, including Web-based courses.

The decision to increase dues was not made lightly or quickly by the board. After two years of trying to balance the budget; analyzing MLA's expenses, revenues, and programs; and comparing MLA's finances to other associations and where we fall in terms of several benchmarks as far as financial performance, the board decided it was time to recommend higher dues. And in February, the February meeting of this year, the board recommended a dues change.

Now, surveys show also that members prefer smaller and more frequent increases rather than one big increase. To minimize impact, this proposed increase will be phased in over 2005 and 2006, should it pass. Other factors were considered such as boosting the annual salary cap from $24,000 to $30,000 for the discounted salary-adjusted dues category, which will enable more members to save money on dues.

For example, in 2004, a member with an annual salary of $29,000 paid dues of $135. With the proposed dues change beginning in 2005, that member would pay only $90, and, in 2006, only $100. So for the first two years of this increase, that member would have a savings totaling $80.

The proposed increase will add about $60,000 in dues in 2005 and again another $60,000 in 2006. These funds will be used to support the new initiatives members have asked for and enable the profession to seize the power of new opportunities.

Beginning on March 15 of this year, members were invited to discuss the dues proposal on an MLANET forum and details were in the March 2004 issue of the MLA News. I hope that you were able to take a look at those.

The proposal will also be the subject of an open forum this afternoon at 2:30, and the proposal will be introduced at the business meeting on Tuesday, tomorrow, at 9:00 a.m.

MLA relies on the participation and support of its members. Our collective voice is MLA, and together we are more powerful than any of us could be alone. MLA is working hard and smarter to meet current challenges and identify new opportunities for the profession and for you.

We need all health information professionals to be MLA members and for all members to support the dues increase. A time of increasing pressure is no time for retrenchment.

So I invite you to attend the dues open forum this afternoon, 2:30 to 3:30, in the Thoroughbred Room down at the end of the hall, to lend your support to the board's motion or to get answers to questions you may have. Thank you.

President Thibodeau thanked Mr. Rambo and introduced MLA Executive Director Carla J. Funk, CAE. Ms. Funk presented the following executive director's report.

Carla J. Funk, CAE: First, I want to take this opportunity to thank Pat and the MLA Board of Directors on behalf of the staff for an exhausting but exhilarating year. We have accomplished a lot, as you can tell from the presentations and programs given so far at the meeting.

MLA has always relied upon its strong partnerships between you, the membership, and the staff to accomplish our goals, a recurring theme of my past presentations.

After listening to Harm de Blij yesterday, however, I have decided that MLA is also the Luxembourg of library associations, relying also on the power of our outside partners to get things done.

The full headquarters' annual report can be found on MLANET, but I want to briefly describe this morning how these partnerships over the past year have enabled us to forward our strategic goals in ways that we could not have done on our own.

Join me on a quick tour through MLA's strategic goals, while I describe some of these partnerships. For example, we have continued to work hard on recruitment, membership, and leadership issues assisted by powerful partners such as the National Library of Medicine (NLM) and the association, university, and corporate communities.

MLA has continued its focus on minority recruitment and leadership development by awarding, through the Association of Research Libraries (ARL), the first MLA/ARL Leadership and Career Development Grants to two worthy candidates.

We also continue to work with the American Library Association to award an annual NLM/MLA spectrum scholarship. Neither of these partnerships would have been possible without a generous grant from the National Library of Medicine.

We have recently partnered with Vanderbilt University's Eskind Biomedical Library to study roles and training of the information specialist in context. This eighteen-month study has already begun and will be discussed at an open forum this afternoon. We are excited about what influence the results of this study could have on the future of the profession.

This year, MLA's corporate community, another powerful partner, has supported all or part of 30% of MLA's grants, scholarships, and awards that help our members and others develop professional and leadership knowledge and skills.

We have also worked with groups such as the Health Occupation Students of America (HOSA) to add medical librarian career pages to their Websites and publications. HOSA also featured an article about medical librarianship in their newsletter.

MLA is supporting at least one grant proposal for a $1 million Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) grant to study the library workforce and will work with the awardee to ensure that medical librarianship is well represented in the study. And this is a new initiative. The proposals are due in June, early June. So, we are quite excited about this.

One-third of the graduate schools of library and information science have now linked MLANET from their schools' Websites, thanks to the efforts of MLA staff.

As a result of these activities and many others that our members have taken part in, MLA membership has become more diverse and MLA now has over 300 student members, twice the number that we had in 2000.

There have also been some new developments in lifelong learning. MLA along with the American Association of Law Libraries (AALL), the American Theological Library Association, a new partner, and the Dominican University Graduate School of Library and Information Science has submitted a joint IMLS grant to support the development of Web-based courses. We will find out in the fall whether we were successful.

MLA chapters have been our long-term partners in a variety of ways including the benchmarking initiative. This year, the Southern Chapter helped pilot the CE Committee's independent learning program, which will allow members to receive MLA contact hours by reading selected JMLA articles and responding to questions. This program will debut, I believe, in the July JMLA.

Also our teleconference partners, including a Chicago area community college, assisted us in producing our first DVD—we used the health information literacy teleconference for that—and our first Webcast, using the expert searching teleconference. Today, ten times more members take MLA-approved CE regionally or locally than at the annual meeting.

As Pat said yesterday, advocacy has been a very high priority in the association this year. With our long-time partner, the Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries (AAHSL), the Joint MLA/AAHSL Legislative Task Force produced a statement on public access that discussed creating, accessing, and preserving knowledge. This statement was recently used successfully on our visits to Congress, and each association will continue to work on this document.

This year, MLA has joined the Open Access Working Group with the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC), AAHSL, ARL, ALA, AALL, the Open Society Institute, the Association of College and Research Libraries, Public Knowledge, and the Public Library of Science in support of open access initiatives.

Also with AALL, ALA, ARL, and SLA, we formed the Information Access Alliance to advocate for further economic study of the impact of journal publishing consolidations and large-scale bundling of journals by publishers.

One of our powerful partners is Public Communications Inc., our public relations firm, who assists us in developing products for the profession, such as the Advocacy Toolbox, and the consumer, such as the Deciphering Medspeak brochure.

Yesterday, Pat detailed some additional public relations initiatives, and it is good to know that from March 2003 through April 2004, advocacy efforts by MLA and its partners have reached nearly 2.3 million people, plus Congress and the federal agencies.

Pat mentioned some of the initiatives in creating and communicating our knowledge including the National Library of Medicine's immeasurable service to MLA and the profession by making the back files of BMLA available on PubMed Central and continuing to make the full text of JMLA freely accessible online, one way that MLA supports open access.

Also NLM and MLA helped support the first hospital library cohort in the use of ARL's LibQUAL+ survey instrument. A report about this pilot project will be made available as soon as results have been analyzed and distributed by the participants.

Neal-Schuman, MLA's publishing partner, produced two MLA books this year, the fourth edition of The Introduction to Reference Sources and the Health Sciences by Boorkman, Huber, and Roper and the Medical Library Association Encyclopedia Guide to Searching and Finding Health Information on the Web by Anderson and Allee.

Headquarters also coordinated a publication of two new DocKits and one BibKit to add to our professional knowledgebase.

MLA's corporate community continued to provide 50% of our annual meeting revenues through exhibits and sponsorships. This sponsorship and exhibit revenue helps support many annual meeting activities and the posting of the annual meeting posters and presentations on MLANET as well as other MLANET-based initiatives, including the benchmarking project.

Over ninety-eight presentations from the 2003 annual meeting are currently available on MLANET, and we hope to mount many more from this year's meeting.

Finally, MLA continues to build its community of partners. This year, we organized a joint exhibit with EAHIL, CHLA/ABSC, and NLM at the IFLA 2003 meeting in Berlin.

MLA also exhibited at the Indiana Health Science Library Association meeting last month. And I think this is the first state group that we have been invited to exhibit at, and I had a fine time. We also added many links on MLANET to the international, state, and regional health sciences library and information groups in order to improve networking regionally and globally.

All of the association's many partners help MLA to extend its voice, expand its reach, and enhance the profession of health sciences librarianship. We could not do what we do without them and, of course, without you, the membership. May the power be with us. Thank you very much.

President Thibodeau: The next order of business is the annual report. In the interest of time, we will receive the annual reports in a block. The informational reports of the appointed officials, the councils, the committees, the representatives, the chapters, and the sections are found in the MLA Annual Report 2003/ 04. These reports are posted on MLANET and are available to everyone there. They will remain available on MLANET throughout this year. They are also available in paper copy by request from the executive director's office.

President Thibodeau called for corrections or amendments to the reports. There being none, the reports were filed as presented.

President Thibodeau then announced that the agenda for the 2004 MLA business meeting would be continued on Tuesday, May 25, for the topics of dues increase, recognition of outgoing board members, reception of incoming board members, and the inaugural address of President-elect, Joanne G. Marshall, FMLA. New motions can be accepted in the second meeting.

The business meeting was recessed at noon and was scheduled to continue at 9:00 a.m. Tuesday in the National Ballroom.

AWARDS CEREMONY

The Awards Ceremony and Luncheon followed the Monday morning business meeting. President Thibodeau opened the ceremony by noting that “we gather annually to honor our colleagues who have made outstanding contributions to the profession and the association.” She then thanked Janice Kelly, chair of the Awards Committee; Julie Trumble, chair of the Grants and Scholarships Committee; and all the jury members for their time and effort. After each award was described, the recipients approached the podium to receive their respective certificates or awards, unless otherwise noted.

The first award recipient that President Thibodeau announced was Donald A. Henderson. Dr. Henderson was scheduled to present the Joseph Leiter NLM/ MLA Lecture in June 2004 at NLM. His lecture was titled “Plagues for the 21st Century—A Communications Challenge.” Dr. Henderson received his certificate in June.

Next, President Thibodeau announced that Senator Arlen Specter, Republican from Pennsylvania, would be presented with the Award for Distinguished Public Service in the spring in Washington, DC. Senator Specter, as chair of the Senate Labor, Health and Human Services, Education Appropriations Subcommitee, was the leading proponent in Congress in support of the successful effort to double the National Institutes of Health (NIH) budget. During the five-year doubling campaign, funding for the National Library of Medicine (NLM) was increased at a rate greater than the NIH overall. In addition, Senator Specter supported an ongoing effort to design and construct a new facility for NLM on the NIH campus, and he demonstrated a strong commitment to increasing federal support for telemedicine and library science programs.

At the opening plenary session of the MLA '04 annual meeting, Harm J. de Blij, author, professor, and television personality, delivered his lecture titled “Geographic Illiteracy and National Security.” Immediately following his talk, he received an award and certificate for presenting the 2004 John P. McGovern Lecture.

The 2004 MLA Scholarship recipient was Amanda Biggins, a library student at the Graduate School of Library and Information Science at the University of Illinois–Urbana-Champaign. Rebecca Davies-Venn, a graduate student in the College of Information Studies at the University of Maryland–College Park, received the 2004 MLA Scholarship for Minority Students.

President Thibodeau then introduced Grace Ajuwon as the 2004 Cunningham fellow. Ms. Ajuwon is a reference and information services librarian at the E. Latunde Odeku Medical Library, Ibadan, Nigeria. Ms. Ajuwon arrived in the United States in mid-March and traveled throughout the United States learning from her colleagues. Ms. Ajuwon spoke briefly and thanked her American hosts.

Each year, EBSCO Information Services donates funds to MLA's grants endowment to provide up to $1,000 each for as many as four librarians. The recipients use the grant funds to travel to MLA's annual meeting and to offset other meeting-related expenses. The 2004 EBSCO/MLA Annual Meeting Grants were awarded to the following: Jon Crossno, co-manager, Information Desk, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center Library–Dallas; Anne Heimann, librarian, BryanLGH College of Health Sciences Library, BryanLGH Medical Center, Lincoln, Nebraska; Misa Mi, medical librarian, Children's Hospital of Michigan Medical Library, Detroit Medical Center, Detroit; and, Lin Wu, reference librarian, Health Sciences Center Library, University of Tennessee–Memphis.

The Hospital Libraries Section (HLS) sponsors an annual grant to provide librarians working in hospitals and similar clinical settings with support for educational or research activities. President Thibodeau introduced the 2004 HLS/MLA Professional Development Grant recipients, Lisa Blackwell and Pamela Barnard. Ms. Blackwell, an assistant librarian at the Grant Morrow, MD, Library at Columbus Children's Hospital, Columbus, Ohio, was unable to attend. Her grant was to be used to attend the annual conference of the North American Serials Interest Group in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, in June 2004. Ms. Barnard, senior knowledge consultant in library services at the Alina Hospitals and Clinics in Minneapolis, Minnesota, used her grant to attend a continuing education course at MLA '04.

President Thibodeau explained that the David A. Kronick Traveling Fellowship was established in 2001 with an endowment from the Bowden-Massey Foundation. It is awarded annually to an MLA member to cover expenses involved in traveling to three or more medical libraries in the United States or Canada for the purpose of studying a specific aspect of health information management. This year's recipient was Ellen Crumley, clinical/child health research librarian in the Department of Pediatrics, University of Alberta–Edmonton, Canada. Ms. Crumley planned to visit various libraries across the United States to glean information to help establish a Pediatric Clinic at the Children's Hospital in Edmonton. Ms. Crumley was unable to attend MLA '04.

The Donald A. B. Lindberg Research Fellowship was established in 2001 with contributions from MLA members and others in the health care community. The fellowship is named in honor of Dr. Lindberg, director of the National Library of Medicine since 1984, in recognition of his significant national and international achievements at NLM, the world's largest medical library. The fellowship is awarded annually through a competitive grant process to a qualified health care professional, researcher, educator, administrator, or librarian. MLA established the fellowship to fund research linking the information services provided by librarians to improved health care. The 2004 recipient of the award is Timothy Patrick, assistant professor of health informatics at the School of Medicine, University of Missouri–Columbia. Dr. Patrick plans to use the award to research evidence-based information retrieval in the field of post-genomic medicine. He is the second recipient of the award. The 2004 fellowship was sponsored by The Elsevier Foundation.

The Medical Informatics Section (MIS) established its MIS/MLA Career Development Grants program in 1997. The section awards up to two individuals $1,500 each in support of career development activities that will contribute to the advancement of the field of medical informatics. This year's MIS/MLA grants were awarded to Margaret Gorman and Sara Anne Hook. Ms. Gorman, coordinator for data and safety monitoring at the Arizona Cancer Center at the University of Arizona–Tucson, plans to use her award to develop the creation of a thesaurus to map frequently used medical terminology for the Arizona Cancer Institute. Ms. Gorman was unable to attend the annual meeting. Ms. Hook, associate dean and a part-time professor in the School of Informatics at Indiana University–Indianapolis, plans to use to her award to take two online courses to further her education in health informatics.

President Thibodeau introduced Ellen Crumley as the recipient of the MLA Research, Development, and Demonstration Project Grant. This grant promotes excellence in health sciences librarianship and information science. Ms. Crumley plans to conduct a pilot study examining child-relevant systematic reviews at the Children's Hospital in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. Ms. Crumley could not attend the annual meeting.

The MLA Continuing Education Grant is awarded annually to an MLA member to assist with the development of theoretical, administrative, or technical aspects of medical librarianship. The 2004 recipient is Bette Sydelko, head of reference and instruction services at Fordham Health Sciences Library, Wright State University, in Dayton, Ohio. She plans to use her grant to participate in a Web-based course on biomedical informatics.

The Estelle Brodman Award for the Academic Medical Librarian of the Year was established with a gift from Irwin H. Pizer and is given to an association member who has made outstanding contributions to academic medical librarianship as demonstrated by excellence in performance, publications, research, service, or a combination thereof. President Thibodeau presented the award with the following remarks:

I am pleased to present the Estelle Brodman Award to Kathryn (Katy) Nesbit, posthumously. Molly Nesbit, Ms. Nesbit's sister, will accept the award on her behalf. Katy Nesbit was coordinator of education services at the Edward G. Miner Library at the University of Rochester Medical Center in Rochester, New York. Ms. Nesbit was nationally recognized for her teaching expertise in the field of health sciences librarianship. Among Ms. Nesbit's most significant achievements were developing the “double helix” curriculum at the University of Rochester Medical School and developing the “Nesbit filters” for evidence-based medicine via Web searches. In addition, Ms. Nesbit was very active in MLA and served as chair of the Continuing Education Committee; taught numerous courses at MLA conferences and state and physician organizations; and was a Distinguished Member of the Academy of Health Information Professionals. Other institutions around the country are using her curriculum and search techniques as a prototype. Ms. Nesbit exemplified the kind of leadership qualities envisioned by the Brodman award. Molly Nesbit accepted the award and thanked the association on behalf of her sister Katy Nesbit.

The Lucretia W. McClure Excellence in Education Award was established in 1998 and first presented in 1999, in honor of one of MLA's most respected members. The award recognizes an outstanding educator in the field of health sciences librarianship and informatics who demonstrates skills in teaching, curriculum development, mentoring, research, or leadership in education at local, regional, or national levels. President Thibodeau presented the award jointly to Janis Glover and to Kathryn Nesbit, posthumously, for their collaboration in the development of educational programs.

Ms. Glover, education coordinator for the Cushing/ Whitney Medical Library at Yale University School of Medicine, leads a program of class-coordinated instruction for the medical school, nursing, and clinical scholars programs. She also serves as the research librarian for the National Center for Children Exposed to Violence and teaches faculty and students at Yale. She has received numerous awards, including the Yale University Library Service Quality Award. In addition, she has served on various MLA committees. Both Ms. Glover and Ms. Nesbit were known throughout the field for their joint teaching and research at both the regional and national level. Courses they developed and co-taught include MLA CE courses, courses at the American College of Surgeons, and “How to Teach EBM” workshops at McMaster University and the New York Academy of Medicine, as well as an MLA CE course on the topic. They also worked on a study that provides teaching librarians methods of how to measure student performance on MEDLINE searches. Their outstanding teaching and research won the MLA Research Section Research Award in both 2001 and 2002. Ms. Nesbit and Ms. Glover demonstrate commitment to the role of medical librarianship and have shared their knowledge, broadly promoting excellence in education. Ms. Nesbit's sister, Molly, again accepted the award on her sister's behalf.

The Lois Ann Colaianni Award for Excellence and Achievement in Hospital Librarianship is given to a professional who has made significant contributions to the profession in overall distinction or leadership in hospital library administration or service; has produced a definitive publication related to hospital librarianship, teaching, research, or advocacy; or has developed or applied innovative technology to hospital librarianship. President Thibodeau introduced Christine Chastain-Warheit, director of medical libraries at the Christiana Care Health System in Newark, Delaware. Ms. Chastain-Warheit is a Distinguished Member of the Academy of Health Information Professionals (AHIP) and is known as a driving force behind the excellence of libraries with the Christiana Care Health System, expanding programs, services, and collaborative efforts since 1987. Ms. Chastain-Warheit embodies the qualities of stellar leadership in hospital librarianship and has been a leader in local, regional, and national professional organizations. At the time of receiving the award, she was president of the Delaware Library Consortium and chair of the MLA Hospital Libraries Section Membership Committee.

The Louise Darling Medal for Distinguished Achievement in Collection Development in the Health Sciences recognizes distinguished achievement in collection development in the health sciences. It was endowed by Ballen Booksellers. President Thibodeau presented the 2004 award to Gayle Willard, director of the Veterinary Medical Library at Kansas State University–Manhattan. Ms. Willard is an innovative leader in the promotion of veterinary collection development and has worked to educate fellow health information professionals, veterinarians, students, and the general public on the topic. Her work in creating the Kansas Animal Welfare Collection encompasses over 3,000 items including books, videotapes, DVDs, and periodicals of interest related to the well-being of animal species. Since 1994, she has applied for and received grants to build the collection. Over the years, Ms. Willard has also been active in numerous veterinary groups including the MLA Veterinary Medical Libraries Section. She is a Distinguished Member of the Academy of Health Information Professionals and chair of MLA's Membership Committee. As Ralph Richardson, dean of the College of Veterinary Medicine states, “Ms. Willard has excelled in service, team-building, and in bringing internationally-recognized collections to our college and to Kansas State University.”

The Thomson Scientific/Frank Bradway Rogers Information Advancement Award is sponsored by Thomson Scientific and recognizes outstanding contributions in the application of technology to the delivery of health sciences information, to the science of information, or to the delivery of health sciences information. President Thibodeau presented the 2004 award to a group of librarians from the National Library of Medicine for their vision and hard work in creation of MedlinePlus, a benchmark Website for health information for the general public in both English and Spanish. MedlinePlus was developed using a combination of scripting software and database structures to deliver its content on the Web. The program has been integrated with other NLM services, including PubMed and DOCLINE. Each month, more than two million users around the world use MedlinePlus. Librarians, medical health organizations, and accrediting organizations all recognize its importance as an outstanding Website. The following were recipients of the award: Joyce E. B. Backus, Paula Kitendaugh, Lori J. Klein, Eve-Marie Lacroix, Wei Ma, Jennifer Marill, and Naomi Miller.

The 2004 Majors/MLA Chapter Project of the Year was presented to the Pacific Northwest Chapter of the Medical Library Association for their innovative continuing education class on survey basics using survey software for librarians at both the chapter and national level. This award recognizes excellence, innovation, and contribution to the profession of health sciences librarianship by an MLA chapter and is sponsored by Majors Scientific Books. Vicki Croft accepted the award for the chapter.

President Thibodeau continued the ceremony with these remarks concerning the President's Award:

From time to time, the officers and the Board of Directors see that an exceptional contribution has been made to the profession and the goals of the association and, therefore, elect to give the President's Award recognizing the significant contribution. This year, the award is presented to both Martha R. Fishel and Betsy L. Humphreys for their work in transferring the Medical Library Association's scholarly publication, the Bulletin of the Medical Library Association (BMLA), now known as the Journal of the Medical Library Association (JMLA), into digital format from 1911 onward, making it available to librarians and other health professions throughout the world via PubMed Central. Ms. Humphreys is associate director, Library Operations, and Ms. Fishel is the deputy chief, Public Services Division at the National Library of Medicine.

In addition, President Thibodeau recognized the following NLM staff members who were part of the team and instrumental in the planning, organization, and execution of the PubMed Central project: David Lipman, Ed Sequeira, Sergey Krasnov, Kristine Scannell, and Mary Kate Dugan.

The Ida and George Eliot Prize was next to be presented. The Ida and George Eliot Prize is presented for a work published in the preceding calendar year that has been judged most effective in furthering medical librarianship. The prize was awarded this year to Eileen Abels, Keith Cogdill, and Lisl Zach for their article, “The Contributions of Library and Information Services to Hospitals and Academic Health Sciences Centers: A Preliminary Taxonomy,” which appeared in the July 2002 issue of the JMLA. The article provides information communicating the value of library and information services in institutional settings.

The Murray Gottlieb Prize was established in 1956 by a gift from the Old Hickory Bookshop to recognize and stimulate health sciences librarians' interest in the history of medicine. This year's Murray Gottlieb Prize was awarded to Beth Wagner for her paper titled, “History of Tumor Measurement Using Radiographs.” Ms. Wagner is a librarian in the Division of the Diagnostic Imaging Library at the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center–Houston.

The Rittenhouse Award is presented annually by the Medical Library Association for the best unpublished paper on health sciences librarianship or medical informatics written by a student in an ALA-accredited program of library and information studies or a trainee in an internship in health sciences librarianship or medical informatics and is sponsored by the Rittenhouse Book Distributors, in King of Prussia, Pennsylvania. The 2004 recipient is Derek Hansen for his paper, “Adolescent Health Information Seeking on the Web: A Multi-Disciplinary Review.” Mr. Hansen, a PhD student at the School of Information at the University of Michigan–Ann Arbor, was unable to attend the meeting.

President Thibodeau then introduced Rick Forsman, FMLA, director of the Denison Memorial Library at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center– Denver. A highlight of each MLA annual meeting is the Janet Doe Lecture on the history or philosophy of medical librarianship. Earlier in the morning, Mr. Forsman delivered his lecture titled, “Life and Death on the Coral Reef: An Ecological Perspective on Scholarly Publishing in the Health Sciences.” Immediately after his lecture, Mr. Forsman received a certificate for his insights during the 2004 Janet Doe Lectureship.

Next on the awards ceremony agenda was the introduction of newly inducted Fellows of the Medical Library Association. The Board of Directors named five association members as Fellows of the Medical Library Association in 2004. Fellows are chosen for their outstanding contributions to health sciences librarianship and to the advancement of the purposes of MLA. The following are President Thibodeau's remarks regarding each new Fellow:

  • Thomas G. Basler, FMLA: Along with his many awards and accomplishments, Dr. Thomas Basler can now add the prestigious honor of MLA Fellow to the list. Dr. Basler has been the library director at the Medical University of South Carolina Library in Charleston since 1991. He has worked in the health sciences field for thirty years and epitomizes the skills and qualifications necessary to obtain MLA Fellow status. Dr. Basler has served on the prestigious NLM Biomedical Library Review Committee from 1996–2001 and was its chair 1999–2001. He has also served on many committees for MLA and the Southern Chapter of MLA, AAHSL, and other professional associations. In addition, Dr. Basler has published numerous publications and has taught courses at the College of Library and Information Science at the University of South Carolina, the University of Arizona School of Information Resources and Library Science, and Emory's Graduate School of Library Science. One of his letters of support mentioned “he is one of the most sought after consultants in the medical library and information science area.”
  • Carole M. Gilbert, FMLA: I am pleased to welcome Carole Gilbert, director of library services at the Providence Hospital and Medical Center Medical Library in Southfield, Michigan, as an MLA fellow. She has been a member of MLA and has worked in the field of health sciences librarianship for close to twenty-five years. Ms. Gilbert has served the association in many ways, most notably as an elected member and secretary of the MLA Board of Directors from 1993–1996, and she served on the MLA Nominating Committee in 1997. Various MLA awards received include the MLA Lois Ann Colaianni Award for Excellence and Achievement in Hospital Librarianship and the Ida and George Eliot Prize in 1996. Of note is Ms. Gilbert's significant achievement in the realm of publishing. In 1999, she was named founding editor of the Journal of Hospital Librarianship, publishing its charter issue. As one of her nominators mentioned in support of her nomination, “She represents the best in hospital librarianship, as evidenced by her peers who have elected her to leadership positions in many organizations.”
  • Henry L. Lemkau Jr., FMLA: It is with great pleasure that I recognize Henry Lemkau as an MLA Fellow. Mr. Lemkau is currently director of the Louis Calder Memorial Library at the University of Miami School of Medicine since 1979. He received his MLS from Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, New York, in 1967, and his JD from the University of Miami School of Law in 1994. He has been a member of MLA and has worked in the health sciences library field for over thirty-five years. Mr. Lemkau has served on numerous MLA committees over the years and as an MLA Board of Director member from 1989–1991. Of further note, he has been chair of three different MLA chapters over the years. Mr. Lemkau designed and developed a computerized serials system for the Mount Sinai School of Medicine Library. He has also published a number of papers, the most recent being published in the January 2003 JMLA and has served as a lecturer and consultant at various institutions in the United States and abroad. One of his letters of recommendation mentioned his commitment to mentor staff to higher level positions as stated in, “his long-term concerted effort to push/ guide staff toward commitment of the profession and the association.”
  • Faith A. Meakin, FMLA: director of the University of Florida Health Sciences Center Libraries–Gainesville since 1994, is also being honored as one of this year's MLA Fellows. Ms. Meakin has been a member of MLA and has worked in the field of medical librarianship for thirty-seven years. Prior positions include the executive director of the Southeastern/Atlantic Region of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine and head of reference and reader services for the World Health Organization in Geneva, Switzerland. Over the course of many years, Ms. Meakin has been active on the national level of MLA. Currently, she is a member of the MLA Board of Directors and chair-elect/program chair of the MLA Leadership and Management Section. She has also served on the 1992–1993 and 2001–2002 Nominating Committees and is a Distinguished Member of the Academy of Health Information Professionals. Overall, the major focus of her career has been on the international library cooperation and professional credentialing. Over the course of years, she has mentored library staff, encouraging career growth and academy membership. Ms. Meakin exemplifies an outstanding library leader.
  • Diane G. Schwartz, FMLA: I am pleased to welcome Diane Schwartz, director of libraries and archives at Kaleida Health System in Buffalo, New York, as an MLA Fellow. Ms. Schwartz has served MLA as an MLA Board of Directors member, including board secretary, from 1997–2000, and as a past member of the 2002 Nominating Committee and the 1996 National Program Committee. She currently serves on the editorial board of JMLA. In addition, Ms. Schwartz was instrumental as a cofounder of the Reference Services Section, now Public Services Section of MLA. She has authored or coauthored more than twenty articles in peer-reviewed journals, as well as several book chapters. She has also presented numerous papers locally, regionally, nationally, and internationally.

President Thibodeau continued: The highest honor that the Medical Library Association confers on any individual is the Marcia C. Noyes Award. We have come to the place in today's awards program for presentation of that special distinction. I am pleased to ask Naomi Broering, last year's winner, to introduce the 2004 recipient.

Naomi C. Broering: A brilliant leader, a master organizer, a great achiever, an extraordinary student, an accomplished researcher, and a wonderful person. She has shown exceptional drive in expanding the roles of health sciences libraries in over thirty-five years.

Today, it is my great honor to present the Medical Library Association's 2004 Marcia C. Noyes Lifetime Achievement Award to Dr. Nancy M. Lorenzi, assistant vice chancellor for health affairs, professor of biomedical informatics, School of Medicine, and clinical professor, School of Nursing, at the Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, plus a two-year appointment as clinical professor at the University of Wisconsin School of Nursing.

In the short time we have today, it is not possible to describe all of Nancy Lorenzi's lifetime contributions to medical librarianship and other related health and informatics fields. As most of you probably know, Nancy is a medical librarian, par excellence.

I think I have known Nancy forever; we met around 1969. It was fun rubbing shoulders with Nancy at MLA meetings where she always offered valuable insights to the issue at hand. I was so impressed because of the excitement she generated. This very young librarian, master's degree graduate from Case Western Reserve University in 1968, was already director of the Regional Library Extension Program at the University of Louisville and was selected in 1971 as director of Medical Center Libraries at the University of Cincinnati (UC). This was only four years after earning her MLS degree. Incidentally, she was also enrolled in a second master's degree program at University of Louisville, which she completed in 1975. Nancy was the talk of the association because, in the 1970s, most of the library directors were men, and it was rare for a woman to rise so fast, especially one so young, in her twenties, I recall. She had great leadership capabilities and ran ahead of the pack.

Multitasking is nothing new to Nancy; she invented it! She not only managed the medical libraries at the University of Cincinnati, but, while holding this challenging position in 1980, she earned a doctorate in organizational behavior at the university, served on several MLA committees and NLM's Biomedical Review Committee, was president of the Association of Women Faculty, and served on numerous committees at the University of Cincinnati and its hospital. These activities paved her way to becoming president of MLA in 1982. So, not surprising to anyone, her path to success continues, and today she is assistant vice chancellor for health affairs at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, where she is making her mark.

Nancy never stands still! In the early years of her career at UC, she successfully oversaw the construction of a new medical library and was awarded several million-dollar library grants. In her twenty-eight years leading the libraries at Cincinnati, she also taught university courses on information management; conducted research in health information, biomedical informatics, and organizational behavior; and mentored some recognizable librarians to successful careers. Namely, a few are Billie Broaddus, Richard Lucier, Phyllis Self, Roger Guard, Carol Jenkins, and Ellen Marks. She was an innovative user of technology, having developed applications of television and slow-scan technologies for the transfer of information from the library to patient care areas. In 1998, she was principal investigator of a successful Integrated Advanced Information Management Systems (IAIMS) program at UC. In 2000, she was recruited by Vanderbilt University to work on management of their growing medical informatics programs and development of the electronic medical record effort at the medical center.

Doing all of this isn't enough for Nancy, who manages to leave an imprint on everything. You may know her publications and scholarship in librarianship, but did you know that she has authored over seventy-five works, including books, scholarly articles, editorials, and reports? She won the Rittenhouse Award for the best US graduate student paper as early as 1968 and, from there, progressed to receive other numerous honors and awards over her professional career. Nancy organized and edited the IAIMS symposium issue of BMLA in 1992, when I was editor of the journal. She contributed at least three books coauthored with her husband, Dr. Bob Riley, to the Computers in Health Care Series publications of Springer Verlag. Transforming Healthcare through Information of this series is a seminal work.

When she was president of MLA in 1982, Nancy launched the research program initiative, which has subsequently grown into a major program of the association. She also reorganized MLA's management and financial structure to assure fiscal solvency and launched strategic planning for the association's advancement. She created and chaired the MLA Strategic Planning Committee from 1981–1983. Through her fund-raising efforts, Nancy convinced Dr. John McGovern in 1984 to donate funds for the McGovern lecture, which we enjoy every year at the MLA meeting.

As for notable, Nancy has been recognized with honors and awards, testimony to her accomplishments and the effect of her contributions to our profession. She was elected by her colleagues as an MLA Fellow, as one of MLA's most notable medical librarians in the last 100 years, and as president of the association. In 1994, it was my pleasure to successfully nominate Nancy as a Fellow in the American College of Medical Informatics (ACMI). She was then elected to the Board of Directors of American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA) and ACMI and served as AMIA program chairman. Presently, she is president of the International Medical Informatics Association (IMIA), substantiating her leadership and stature in the international community of medical informatics.

Regarding service to the profession, let me just mention briefly that Nancy was selected to participate in over sixty-seven important committees and advisory panels at Cincinnati, NLM, and MLA. Here is a sampling of these accomplishments:

  • She represented the University of Cincinnati on the King's Fund College, London, England, in 1978.
  • She served on the US President's White House Committee on Library and Information Science, a position that was extended from 1979 to 1982.
  • She skipped being a board member and was directly elected president-elect of MLA in 1981, becoming president in 1982.
  • During the IAIMS grant project of Cincinnati, as principal investigator in 1988, a major achievement in itself, she spearheaded, founded, and chaired the IAIMS Consortium and served as chair for two terms.
  • She chaired a National Library of Medicine long-range planning panel in 1985–1986.
  • She served as chair and member of strategic planning committees and Liaison Committee on Medical Education self-study committees at Cincinnati.
  • She acquired and coordinated a community-wide effort grant from the National Telecommunication and Information Administration.

She is a highly productive researcher, lecturer, and teacher. Her work covers information transfer, organizational behavior, knowledge management, and human aspects of informatics on organizations. Nancy has taught a variety of topics ranging from medical bibliography to MLA CE courses, to seventy courses on library management and organizational change, to master's and PhD courses in biomedical informatics.

Nancy has addressed major conferences: MLA, AMIA, MedInfo, and IMIA. She has achieved international recognition, having been invited to speak at informatics conferences in Australia, Asia, British Columbia, Canada, England, Japan, and numerous others.

As you can see, Dr. Nancy Lorenzi is a celebrity and a superstar in our field. Let me share with you how proud some of her nominees are. One nominator emphasized Nancy's “lasting and significant contribution to the profession as an innovator, teacher, mentor, scholar, author, and administrator.” Something none of us can deny. Another said, “I have known few librarians who have been the equal of Nancy in service to MLA and in sheer competence. She is clearly the standout that Case Western Reserve University has produced.” A third pointed to her foresight and vision saying, “that nothing is ever again the same once Nancy Lorenzi becomes involved. She has always been found in the thick of major change events.” She was noted for presenting challenges “to expand our vision, learn continuously, adapt to change and remain preeminent as information professionals.”

I believe what “unequivocally substantiates” this award to Nancy is her leadership and contribution to the overall health library and medical informatics profession. Nancy's career has bridged two meaningful professions that are dedicated to the delivery of biomedical information to improve patient care. She is indeed dedicated to a most noble cause.

Personally, I have been privileged to enjoy exciting moments with Nancy sharing our vision for the profession, exploring opportunities to advance the field, and planning project ideas with immense potential. We have laughed, we have cried, and we have grown together. It is an accumulation of these times that I treasure the most, because Nancy helps us dream, grow, and achieve.

It is fitting that Nancy's leadership and her achievements be recognized by our highest award. It is a special pleasure to be the person to present the 2004 MLA Marcia C. Noyes Award to my friend and colleague, Dr. Nancy Lorenzi. Thank you.

Dr. Lorenzi acknowledged the award with these remarks:

Thank you, Naomi. I am honored by this very significant MLA award, a true career capstone award! Thank you to the Medical Library Association for the opportunities to both serve and grow and to the connections to people and ideas. My life roles and responsibilities were ever evolving and still are. There was a need for constant learning whether I wanted to or not! The learning came from my successes and my nonsuccesses; from people who were my role models, including a number of you in the audience; and from countless hours of effort. This learning caused me to raise my level of comfort with unfamiliar tasks in multiple areas. Finally, heartfelt thanks to MLA and my many MLA friends for the opportunities and the lifelong connections. To friends and loved ones, here or not, for the nomination and selection of this very significant life award, you will always have a special place in my heart.

President Thibodeau approached the podium and formally presented a bowl representing the award to Dr. Lorenzi. After congratulating her, she closed the ceremony with these words:

Each year, the Awards Ceremony and Luncheon serves as an important reminder of the variety of accomplishments our peers have made to the profession. It simultaneously provides the encouragement to continue aspiring towards higher levels of achievement. In recognizing these individuals, we affirm the “best and brightest” in the field of health sciences librarianship. This concludes today's presentation, and I thank you for joining me. Enjoy the rest of the meeting.

BUSINESS MEETING II, PRESIDENTIAL INAUGURAL ADDRESS, AND MLA '05 INVITATION

Tuesday, May 25, 2004

President Thibodeau reconvened the MLA business meeting, so that discussion and action could take place on the proposed dues increase. The sergeant-at-arms verified that the required quorum of 250 MLA voting members was present.

Neil Rambo, MLA treasurer, gave a brief report of the open forum held the previous day by the Board of Directors to address the issue of the dues increase. He then presented the following motion:

Neil Rambo: On behalf of the Board of Directors, I move that the Medical Library Association members' dues be increased as follows, effective January 1, 2005.

For individual members in the category of active voting membership, the amounts would be:

  • regular member, $150 in 2005 and $165 in 2006
  • regular member with an annual salary less than $30,000, $90 in 2005 and $100 in 2006
  • introductory member, $100 in 2005 and $110 in 2006
  • affiliate member, $90 in 2005 and $100 in 2006
  • international member, $100 in 2005 and $110 in 2006
  • student member, $35 in 2005 and $40 in 2006
  • emeritus member, $55 in 2005 and $65 in 2006

For institutional members, the amounts would be:

  • budgets up to $199,000, $235 in 2005 and $255 in 2006
  • budgets between $200,000 and $699,999, $380 in 2005 and $420 in 2006
  • and, finally, budgets above $699,999, $545 in 2005 and $600 in 2006

By the way, you should have all received, when you walked in, a summary of the dues increase proposal, and this litany that I just read through is summarized in the table in the back. If you do not have one, and you would like to have a copy, I think if you raised your hand, we could get those distributed to you. There is no second needed for this motion, as it comes from the board. Thank you.

President Thibodeau: Thank you, Neil. It has been moved that the Medical Library Association's dues be increased beginning January 1, 2005, and that the actual amount of the increase be as presented.

President Thibodeau reminded the members of the Rules of Assembly used for discussion the previous day.

Jean Siebert, West Virginia University–Morgantown: Hello. My name is Jean Siebert. I am from Morgantown, West Virginia, and, on behalf of librarians who make less than they should, I am wondering if there has been any consideration of raising that $30,000 to more like the base, halfway maybe like $35,000 or something like that because $30,000 is, in my opinion, rather low given the base pay for most starting librarians.

Mr. Rambo: Thanks. The board did consider the salary cap that should be applied to the amount qualifying for the lower adjusted or the discounted adjusted dues category, and it was raised from $24,000 to $30,000. And I think—I do not have the numbers at hand—I think that was based on the salary survey and the number of members who fell into that category.

With that reduced or discounted dues amount, I think over 900 members do qualify for a reduced amount. And I do not know what the effect would be, and perhaps somebody else can respond to this, of raising it, how many more would fall into the $30,000 to $35,000.

Ms. Siebert: Yes, because I think that might be something that would help, because my concern is that the lower-paid members are the least likely ones to be able to attend the annual meeting. And so you are not getting a representative sample of people who it really impacts. Thank you.

Mr. Rambo: There certainly has been consideration of this and it is—it becomes one of those balancing kinds of effects between being able to support the association as well as allowing people at lower salary levels to participate. And it is a matter of trying to balance that, but it is a comment that we will certainly take under consideration.

Ms. Siebert: Because the recruitment and retention of new members is very, very important and vital to this organization.

President Thibodeau: Right. The other thing we have to look at is when we switch categories and raise the salary, we might actually offset the gain in the dues increase and…

Ms. Siebert: That is true.

President Thibodeau: So, it is a very complex situation, but we looked at the membership, as Neil said, as to where the majority of members would fall and what the average salaries based on our salary data would be. And we felt that this was a reasonable level at this point. But thank you for your comments.

Ms. Siebert: Thank you for listening.

helen-ann brown, Cornell Medical Library, New York: I am helen-ann brown from the Cornell Medical Library in New York City. I support the dues increase, but I have a question. For those of us who pay our own dues and have lots of other financial responsibilities, will there be any kind of installment that you can pay each month as opposed to paying one amount, one big amount?

President Thibodeau: Carla. We have talked about that, but I will let Carla address this.

Ms. Funk: This is something that we have talked about in the past and every time we handle something, of course it costs more, we all know that, to do. We have thought about maybe quarterly, something like that, to kind of ease the burden for people. And that is something we can look at internally. Some people do that and some do not. I think monthly, helen-ann, that is probably a little bit too frequently, but…

President Thibodeau: It is a good suggestion. Thank you.

Kathleen Hughes, SUNY Upstate, Syracuse, New York: In support of the first questioner, I am Kathy Hughes from Syracuse, New York. And Neil mentioned yesterday that you had benchmarked our dues against other organizations. I would like to know what those organizations were and what their salary baseline looked like.

I think also it should be $35,000. We have so many part-time and solo librarians, and also the registration for the meeting is very difficult for those who are self pay.

President Thibodeau: Just to let you know, the registration is an entirely separate issue and one that we work on very hard. But do we have the data on these associations on the average salary? But in terms of the cutoff for a lower price, do we have that?

Ms. Funk: I do not know that all associations actually give people breaks. Some do; some do not. We have a lot of different dues categories, I think, more than many of our sister associations, to give people breaks. I do not really know that. Many of them just have a flat fee. If you are a member, you are a member.

I know that the closest association to us, our real sister association, is the American Association of Law Libraries, and their dues right now—and I think we put this in the background to you—is $163 a year.

President Thibodeau: Is there any further discussion?

There was no response, and President Thibodeau continued.

President Thibodeau: Hearing none, it has been moved that the Medical Library Association's dues be increased effective January 1, 2005, and that the actual amount of the increase be as presented. Hearing no objection, will the sergeant-at-arms take the count? Those in favor of the motion to increase the dues, raise your paddle.

Three hundred and eighty-three voted in favor of the proposal.

Those opposed, raise your paddles.

Fifty-two. There being 383 in favor and 52 opposed, the motion is adopted.

Thank you so much on behalf of the board. This was a very difficult decision to come before you with a dues increase during times that are less than ideal economically. So, we thank you for your support, and we will use the dues increase wisely and pursue the activities that you need to have us pursue. Thank you so much.

Is there any other new business to come before the assembly?

Wayne Peay, FMLA, University of Utah–Salt Lake City: My name is Wayne Peay. I am at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City, and I would like to offer the following motion: The Medical Library Association will cease accepting funding from publishers who do not support open access. And I have a second.

President Thibodeau: Yes. Is there a second for the motion?

Mary Ryan seconded the motion.

President Thibodeau: Thank you. You can bring the form forward to me if you want. There is a motion on the floor for discussion. Just remember the Rules of Order, two minutes to address. Wayne.

Mr. Peay: This is Wayne again. First of all, I would appreciate the opportunity to present this motion and the assistance I receive from the board and the leadership and the staff. I would like to begin by reminding us of the first principle of our Code of Ethics. The health sciences librarian promotes access to health information for all. To be true to our professional values, we must champion open access.

The question today is how can our association accept money from publishers that do not support open access and not have a conflict of interest in representing its members and their values? This conflict of interest is exposed in the financial reports that express how important this money is to the operations of the association.

Let us not forget where this money comes from. This money is extorted from our libraries, from our students for obscene profits and to buy influence. Again, this year, this extortion will mean millions of dollars from our institutional members.

I realize there are many questions and many details relating to this motion. And the rules will not allow me time to respond to all of them. But let me try to anticipate a couple.

First, what is open access? And that is a very fair question and a difficult one to answer. This is a developing model. I do think we can agree that those publishers that work with PubMed Central qualify as open access.

Second, should we not balance our support for open access? And I ask, how do we balance our first principle? Picture what it takes to balance. Every effort is expended in trying to maintain some safe position, not move forward, not advocate, not support our values.

So what about the other valid details? This is clearly a work in progress. There is uncertainty, but I am confident that the membership, the board, working together in good faith can lead this revolution and, by God, we will win. Thank you.

President Thibodeau: Thank you, Wayne. Are there other comments and discussion?

Mary Ryan, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences–Little Rock: I seconded Wayne's motion, because I think this is an important issue that we need to discuss. However, I do have several concerns, and one of them is the same as Wayne's. How do we define open access, because there are lots of different definitions of open access floating around?

That is one concern. The second one is: what are the legal implications of this? If the association lets some people, some publishers exhibit or sponsor events and not others, are there legal implications there? I have no idea.

And the financial implications for the association. Now, a lot of us are going around on our campuses asking the researchers and other people at our institutions who belong to scholarly associations to try to convince their associations to support and move to an open access publishing model for their journals. And that has a lot of financial implications for their associations.

And so while I am trying to convince all these people that they need to go to their associations and support open access, moving to an open access publishing model, I am sitting there thinking, gosh, I hope none of them ask me what my professional association does, because I would not really know how to answer that.

So, what I would like to see is that the newly appointed MLA scholarly communications committee look, take no longer than three months, because we are all running around talking to people on our campuses, take no longer than three months to define open access publishing, a very definite definition of it. Look at the legal implications, look at the financial implications, and come back to us and let us know what those things are so we can discuss it.

President Thibodeau: Two questions. Are you speaking for or against the motion, and are you proposing an amendment to the motion?

Ms. Ryan: Well, let us say I am conflicted at this point.

President Thibodeau: As many of us are, yes.

Ms. Ryan: I do not quite know. I mean, actually, I am probably—I do not think I can vote for the motion today.

President Thibodeau: Okay.

Ms. Ryan: But I think we need to vote on some sort of a motion in the near future. Not next year—that is too late—at the annual meeting. We need to vote on some motion that has more details in it.

President Thibodeau: Okay.

Ms. Ryan: Within three months so we will know what to do with…

President Thibodeau: Yes. Let me address a couple of the issues that Mary has brought up, because they are very important.

One, what is open access? The Scholarly Publishing Task Force that you referred to met this morning, and we heard there are very many flavors of open access. Some of them which go from public domain to free access to other, retaining everything, and they put it on an institutional repository. So, we have got to sort that out, and that is a very good point. And I think the Scholarly Publishing Task Force along with the board can sort that out.

In terms of legal implications, yes, we have to sort that out. There is a possibility it could be viewed as restraint of trade if we went that way. And MLA would be liable to be sued, possibly. We may have to spend about $15,000 to get a legal reading on that particular aspect.

Financially, yes. Just look at Neil's report. I hope you read it. But the sponsorship by the various vendors here, the exhibits alone are a tremendous amount of revenue overall, as well as the advertising for our publications and meeting. Remember, the dues, those are only right now 22%, hopefully up closer to 25% now that you have increased them. But the rest of the 75% heavily comes from the meeting here, exhibits and registration fees, and then, of course, our publicity and advertising. So, there are some very big implications for MLA and what our dues might look like in the future. And, certainly, if you do not like the registration fees now, think about doubling or tripling the registration fees if we do not have exhibits on the floor.

The other problem with open access that we have to sort out is with conglomerates. If the company owns one piece that is commercial and one piece that is open access and another piece that is database, do they all fit underneath the open access restriction? So, lots of complex issues.

Melissa Nasea, East Carolina University, Greenville, North Carolina: I support open access, but I oppose this resolution as it is written right now. I agree with a lot of what has been said so far. But any organization can say, “I support open access.” What does that really mean? This resolution does not define it. So although I might be willing to support a future resolution, I cannot support the resolution as it is written today. And, no, I do not have the golden answer as to how to rewrite it to come up with one that I could support today. Thank you.

President Thibodeau: Thank you for your comments.

Tony McSean, British Medical Association, United Kingdom: I have an interest to declare. I work for the British Medical Association, for whom the revenues and profits gained by the BMJ are a significant revenue stream. And, in declaring my interest, it also illustrates one of the two points I would like to make. It is an incredibly complex situation. We heard in the Janet Doe lecture yesterday and similarly set out in Scott Plutchak's JMLA editorial, the situation is incredibly complex and convoluted and as well balanced as any ecology. And if we take an overly simplistic approach to this issue, we lay ourselves open to being sued, and we may do serious damage to the structure of our professional associations.

I have been an officer in the English and European medical library professional associations, and the relationship is incredibly complex. The Health Libraries Group in the United Kingdom, publishes a for-profit journal using a professional publisher as its publisher. And it is really complex. We depend seriously on that revenue, and it is all very well to say that we should not be doing that. But until we find a way of doing what we want to do without damaging ourselves, we are not in a position to do anything about this. And it is a difficult situation, and I think these are symptomatic of the way that the whole of the publishing and information distribution things are linked together. And if we are going to take a position on this, and we should, we have to, I think, have a more balanced view and to spend some of this dues increase on lawyers' fees to make sure that we do not have to pay larger lawyers' fees in the future. Thank you.

President Thibodeau: Very good point. Thank you.

Karen Butter, University of California–San Francisco: I support open access, but I also support Mary's suggestions. I guess they are not friendly changes to the amendment or to the proposal.

Many of us on our campuses have been working with faculty to encourage open access. And there have been many actions of faculty recognizing the unsustainable nature of scholarly economics. And faculty, for example, on my campus sent around messages to biologists all over the country, and it was incredible the number of responses they received from individuals from all of your—many of your institutions.

I think that we need to show and take a bold step, be a model for other societies. It is very difficult for me to go to talk to my faculty. They come up with all these reasons why their societies cannot move toward open access and toward changes in the scholarly publishing model. This association needs to take a step and move in that direction, and I encourage all of us to move forward. I also would like to see that we do this in a very timely fashion. And I think that using the newly appointed Scholarly Publishing Task Force would be a great way to start out.

President Thibodeau: Thank you. For those of you who do not know, MLA is open access. We actually have given the rights to our authors for a while, and we have publicly put up our JMLA as well as all our back issues at no cost to the world. So, in fact, we have taken a step. We are open access. We are more than just words. We have taken action.

Martin Frank, American Physiological Society: My name is Martin Frank. I am the executive director of the American Physiological Society, and I have been the coordinator and spokesperson for a group called the Washington DC Principles for Free Access to Science (DC Principles).

We organized that group as a response to the advocates for author-pays open access models because of a concern that we had about the definition of open access. As defined, most scholarly publishers are not in favor of open access. We are in favor of free access to the content, either immediately or after a delay, depending on the financial model for your organization. I personally do not have a vote. I am an exhibitor here, and I do not endorse open access. So, therefore, I cannot exhibit next year, if you pass the resolution.

I have had—since we launched the free access movement, we have had the opportunity to talk to many librarians, which is something we have not done in the past. And I did meet with the scholarly group this morning, and we are more than willing to work with MLA to come to a reasonable definition.

Just like your association, we rely on revenues associated with publications and meetings for the activities that we undertake. My organization just got a presidential award because of the fact that we do give back to our society and to our leadership and membership to train the next generation of scientists. But I think you should think very carefully about a resolution as defined here for open access and think about the ramifications for the organization.

I am also going to make—well, I will make another comment to Pat in private, but it relates to how your journal is hosted currently on PubMed Central, but I will talk about that later.

President Thibodeau: Yes. Okay. Right in the two minutes. By the way, for those of you who are curious, we not only met with Marty and his group, but we also met with Helen Doyle from Public Library of Science (PLoS) this morning, so we are looking at the balanced view of things.

T. Scott Plutchak, University of Alabama–Birmingham: It is never comfortable for me to disagree with Wayne, and I think it is important that we shift away from the financial side of things and remember that what Wayne is speaking to is our highest professional values.

President Thibodeau: That is true. Yes.

Mr. Plutchak: So he and I are in agreement that this is one of the most critical times that we have ever faced. We have an opportunity to do more with getting information to people than we ever have before. And it is important that we take bold strokes.

I disagree with Wayne only on tactics. We need to partner with people like Marty Frank and the American Physiological Society. We share the same goals. And, if we pass the motion that Wayne offered today, we drive a wedge between ourselves and the scholars and the researchers and the scientists that we need to partner with.

So I would urge you to vote against the motion. But if you do so, your vote has to be a personal pledge to do everything that you can to work as hard as you can to change the system of scholarly publishing, now, into something that works better for everybody.

Mark Funk, Cornell Medical Library, New York City: How MLA could or should support open access is a complicated issue, and I think it is far too important to be decided today in this limited time. Therefore, I move to refer the issue of ceasing acceptance of funding from publishers who do not support open access to the Executive Committee of the MLA Board, with a report submitted by the September 2004 board meeting.

Ms. Ryan: I second that motion. I was getting ready to make a similar one.

President Thibodeau: Okay. There is a new motion on the floor that has been moved and seconded. Open discussions.

David Brown, Kaiser Permanente, Oakland, California: But excuse me. According to the Rules of Procedure, don't you have to close the first before you discuss the second?

President Thibodeau: No. Actually, because it is a referring motion, it can supersede, because it referred to the board, it is a motion that we can go ahead and discuss and vote on. And, if it is approved, it actually overrides the motion that came to the floor.

Mr. Brown: Okay. That clarifies it for some of us.

President Thibodeau: Thank you. Yes. I am sorry. I skipped that little important part. My parliamentarian briefed me well, but I did not share that with you. Because it is referring back, and because it has financial and legal implications for the association, that kind of motion can override the existing one.

Gale Hannigan, Texas A&M University Health Science Center–College Station: I am just a basic user of all these wonderful resources that I have had opportunity to see. And I am afraid of where it will go, unless important organizations step in, like MLA, and help guide the process. I think the publishers are almost as confused as we are. And I think having them exhibit here is an opportunity for me to talk to them about what I need, what I believe in.

What I do not want to see happen, and I am afraid is going to happen, is this pay-per-view kind of thing where institutions are totally bypassed, and people who have money can actually access things and people who do not cannot. And that goes against our first principle, which is why I appreciate the fact that Wayne reminds us of these important things.

Remembering the geographer on Sunday, I would not want to do anything categorical that would, as Scott said, drive a wedge. I think that communication really has to be a key thing here. We are a symbiotic relationship of producer, publisher, and retriever. And many of us play all of those roles.

And so I really support this new motion that says let us turn this over to our leadership, but let us also create a dynamic forum between now and then that allows all of us to make our thoughts about this known because it really will effect all of us.

President Thibodeau: Thank you. Before we go to the next speaker, Mark, can you bring that motion forward to me? Thank you. Yes, next in the center here.

Marianne Burke, University of Vermont–Burlington: I would like to speak against the substitute motion. I think we should have a vote on the first motion today, to call that question and allow the task force to examine the scholarly communication issue and bring forward another motion that would be more acceptable.

President Thibodeau: Okay. I do not think this precludes—it goes to the Executive Committee for looking at the financial and legal issues, but I am sure they will be talking to the Scholarly Publishing Task Force for input. So, it does not preclude working with that.

Ms. Ryan: I have a question about what happens when the report goes to the Executive Committee.

President Thibodeau: We report out to the membership the resolution of the board as to how we handle that.

Ms. Ryan: Okay. I just have Wayne's concern that if we wait very long, you know, we—something needs to happen. So, that is my concern.

President Thibodeau: After we get through talking about this motion, I am going to have the Scholarly Publishing Task Force members who are present stand up. Let me tell you, this is a very committed group, and we will be working immediately on a whole series of issues. We are going to be looking at a number of things.

So, do not worry that this is going to go by the wayside. And we will have to turn it around and bring it back by September, for the September board meeting, which means the recommendations have to be pretty much done by early August. We will be fast tracking this, and it is in the motion, so there is no delay on this.

Michael Newman, Falconer Biology Library, Stanford University: I am also a founding member of High Wire Press. I support Mark Funk's substitute motion. I think that the motion that Wayne proposed has really two fatal flaws. The first is—as we already discussed— the definition of open access.

In Wayne's discussion, he seemed to indicate that the DC Principles would be covered by open access, but I do not think that is true, and I think that the people who signed the DC Principles would not agree with that. So, I think that really needs to be cleared up.

And the second, really, is what do we mean by support of open access? And I think that you have already mentioned that a—say a large commercial publisher has a huge amount of resources, they could turn, say, 10% of their journals into open access journals, then they support open access. They would fall under the umbrella. Whereas some of our most—some of the publishers that produce the highest quality information for the lowest price, like PNAS, the American Physiological Society, would not fall under that.

President Thibodeau: Thank you for your comments. Is there any further discussion? Again, this is a motion, a referring motion, so it overrides the motion that was previously submitted.

There being no further discussion, the question was called. A majority voted in favor of the motion. The motion was accepted, and the issue was referred to the Executive Committee of the board.

President Thibodeau: We really appreciate actually Wayne's bringing this motion forward, because it is an important topic, one that we have to be more educated about. And I think we have heard some real good speakers this morning speak to the various issues.

President Thibodeau then proceeded to recognize and thank MLA board members who had completed a full three-year term. Diana J. Cunningham, Ruth Holst, FMLA, and Linda Garr Markwell were presented certificates as a token of respect and gratitude for work well done. President Thibodeau also recognized the Scholarly Publishing Task Force members, Diana J. Cunningham, Lynn M. Fortney, Mark E. Funk, Virginia A. Lingle, Michelynn McKnight, JoAnne Sparks, Linda A. Watson, Hospital Libraries Section Representatives Christine Chastain-Warheit and Britain G. Roth, MLA Staff Liaison Carla J. Funk, CAE, with Patricia Thibodeau as chair.

Next, President Thibodeau recognized retiring Immediate Past President Linda A. Watson and presented her with a certificate and plaque. The new members of the MLA Board of Directors were welcomed and introduced: Dixie Alford Jones, Faith Meakin, and MJ Tooey. Sarah Gable was also recognized as the incoming Chapter Council representative to the board. Finally President-elect Joanne G. Marshall, FMLA, rose to present Patricia Thibodeau with an outgoing gift, a presidential cup.

President Thibodeau thanked all those who had worked with her during her presidential year. She then presented to the assembly, and passed the presidential gavel to, MLA 2004/05 President Marshall.

Inaugural address

MLA colleagues and friends, it is truly an honor to serve as your president for 2004/05. MLA has been my professional home for over thirty years. It all began when I took a position as serials librarian in the, as yet-to-be-built, Health Sciences Library at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, in 1970. The library director, Beatrix Robinow, had been an MLA Cunningham Fellow. She was originally from South Africa and had subsequently moved to Canada. All of the junior staff who worked for Mrs. Robinow, and we called her Mrs. Robinow in those days, were in awe of her prodigious knowledge of the field of medical librarianship, her tremendous dedication, and her very long working hours.

Mrs. Robinow insisted that all of the McMaster librarians join MLA and our Upstate New York and Ontario Chapter. When we attended an MLA meeting, we divided up the program and had to create our own combined summary of the entire meeting. What I would have done for the DVD that is available at this conference! But what a learning experience, and one that really set me on the road to recognizing the true value of this tremendous association! During this period, I also met other powerhouse medical librarians in Ontario and New York, including Lucretia W. McClure, FMLA, Ursula Poland, FMLA, and Erich Meyerhoff, FMLA. With role models like these, I thought I had truly struck it rich. One of the experiences that I have enjoyed most at this meeting is talking with new members and students. I can sense the same feeling of excitement and awe that was part of my first few MLA meetings. Like the river that flows through San Antonio, we are all part of the flow of our profession and our association. The river combines the past, the present, and the future as it takes its winding path toward its destination.

Five years ago, I traded my “hi's” for “hey's” and set off for Chapel Hill, North Carolina. It was South Carolina Dean and Past MLA President Fred Roper, FMLA, my favorite Tar Heel, who told me how to say “hey.” I also acquired a new set of pearls, so that I could become a formal member of my new Mid-Atlantic Chapter of MLA. My move demonstrated one of the major advantages of MLA membership. The association and its chapters provide us with a professional home wherever we go. Three of the people I have mentioned as my own mentors are here today. I would ask them to stand as representatives of the many senior leaders of our association who have done so much for us over the years: Lucretia McClure, FMLA, Erich Meyerhoff, FMLA, and Fred Roper, FMLA. Would you please stand and receive our thanks?

Wherever we go, our destination is reflected in our professional mission to provide quality information for improved health. This is not a mission that is bound by type of institution, information format, or even specific services provided. It is the kind of mission that has the power to guide us on our continuing professional journey. Like the phoenix, the firebird that rises from the ashes, we continue to reinvent ourselves and our services in response to the information needs of our users. Similarly, MLA's mission, to be the association of choice for the most visible, valued, and trusted health information experts in the world, guides us in our quest both individually and as an association.

We find ourselves in a very intriguing situation as librarians. We are not licensed professionals and, as such, our license to practice consists of our educational qualifications, our experience, and our active participation in a strong professional association. In many ways, we are our association, and our association is us. It allows us to speak with a strong, collective voice on important issues like open access, and it represents us in interactions with other major stakeholders in the information field. It also provides us with a place to learn, to teach, and to share our expertise. By contributing to MLA, we contribute to the continued existence of our profession and to our own professional development. As we all know, if we were licensed professionals, like most of our health professional colleagues, we would be paying both hefty annual licensing fees as well as association dues. This is something to keep in mind as we contemplate our own dues increase. I congratulate all of you for recognizing our own value and the value of our association by supporting the association through your dues.

You have heard about many of MLA's activities, your activities, throughout this meeting. And I just want to highlight a very few of them in this inaugural address. The Deciphering Medspeak brochure, which is also available as a Web document, has made our association Website one of the most used health Websites by consumers. In fact, there are now more consumers who access MLANET than MLA members because of the available consumer health resources. I challenge us all to think about how we can expand this concept of quality filtering and identifying key Websites into other more specialized areas of health information, something for our sections to take on.

The benchmarking initiative is a great opportunity for all of us to share information, to compare our services, and to use the comparisons as a basis for improving our services in the future. What we need to make the benchmarking database as good as it can be is for all of us to contribute our data. The database will only be as good as all of us make it. I encourage you to build on the fine work of the Benchmarking Implementation Task Force and to make this happen.

The Task Force to Develop MLA's Center of Research and Education (CORE) is creating a gateway to lifelong learning and teaching that will allow us to share our best practices and our educational resources of all types, including user questionnaires, handouts, posters, and other materials. You do not have to write a book or a chapter or a journal article anymore to share all of the knowledge and expertise that you have developed in our field. CORE will provide a whole new set of information sharing possibilities.

As we all know, the Journal of the Medical Library Association is one of the preeminent peer-reviewed journals in the field of library science. The availability of the journal in full text online is another pioneering effort, and the NLM team that is responsible for this effort won a major award at this meeting. Congratulations!

Our Task Force on Expert Searching is re-skilling us in the art and science of complex searching. Our Scholarly Publishing Task Force is exploring the changing field of scholarly communication from copyright management and electronic licensing to some of the fundamental issues that we have identified at this meeting. This promises to be an important area for the association to focus on.

Finally, on the topic of recruitment into the profession, the brochure, Medical Librarianship: A Career beyond the Cutting Edge, is being widely circulated, and we have many new recruitment initiatives going on. Much of this activity is thanks to the funding provided by the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS). We also need to think about retention of MLA members at all different career stages. Both recruitment and retention will be important strategies for dealing with the changes in workforce demographics that are occurring.

In order to realize our mission, there are underlying values that we must keep in mind. These values must flow through everything we do in the association. First, we must increase our diversity. This includes thinking broadly about diversity, not only in racial, ethnic, and gender terms. For example, we should pay attention to the distribution of age groups in our association and in the types of new roles and ensuring that we have programs and services to meet various needs. We also need to diversify the types of professional roles that librarians are playing in the health information field and use this diversity as a way to spur even more innovation and change in our profession. We need to be very welcoming to the new kinds of health information professionals who are working with us, for example, in bioinformatics.

In addition to providing evidence-based health care resources to our users, we must build our own version of evidence-based information and library practice. We need to continue to build our journal, our professional meetings, and MLANET as resources for evidence-based practice. In this way, we can affirm our own value as library and information professionals and continually improve our services.

We must set our standards high as we continue with our original roles as quality filters of health information and creators of user-oriented information services. Increasingly, we must measure the outcomes of our own services and of our association activities, so that we can make improvements on an ongoing basis.

In higher education, a new movement is taking place. The traditional pillars of research, education, and service are being transformed into knowledge discovery, learning, and community engagement. Just as these new conceptions are beginning to change the way educators think of their roles, so will they change the way in which librarians and information professionals relate to their users. This new concept is very much focused on the experience of the learner. Does this sound familiar? Perhaps it is a little like the approach that librarians have taken in focusing on the user of information services. The power of the user-centered approach may be found in the May 17, 2004, issue of Business Week [1]. The title reads, “The Power of Design.” A tiny firm called IDEO, that's spelled I-D-E-O, is redefining good design by creating experiences, not just products. Now, it is changing the way companies innovate. It was some professors at Stanford who founded IDEO, and, now, Stanford is going to create a design school to accompany its famous business school. When we see a story like the one in Business Week, it is a reminder of the power of some of our own ideas—ones that we have developed over the years, and that is as vital as ever. Ultimately, the Business Week article describes a process of designing a better consumer experience. I challenge us all to design a better consumer experience for all of our health information users. The Stanford group uses observation, brainstorming, rapid prototyping, refining, and implementation, as well as some exciting new methods. The Stanford approach is highly interdisciplinary, bringing together psychologists, anthropologists, sociologists, and clients and users. What a powerful idea—to understand the consumer experience and find ways to make it better!

As we move ahead, we are fortunate to have a lot to build on. As I take on the role of MLA president, I am reassured by this knowledge but also awed by the contributions of my predecessors. My goals this year are twofold: to build on this strong foundation and to strengthen our association even more in education and research. It is this continuing building process that makes us strong now and that will serve us well into the future. I believe that continuity is the key to progress. In 2001, we went on an information odyssey in Orlando. In 2002, Carol Jenkins, FMLA, shared with us her practical magic and helped us put a lot of great ideas to work. In 2003, Linda Watson helped us catch the wave and strive for our personal best as extreme librarians. In 2004, Pat Thibodeau challenged us to seize the power of our value. In 2005, we will continue on our journey flowing through the river of our past and present toward a futuro magnífico that will be celebrated in San Antonio at our 2005 annual meeting.

In her annual report, Executive Director Carla J. Funk, CAE, described MLA as the Luxembourg of library associations. Well, we may be small, but we are mighty. This is what I tell the provost of our university at the University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill about our School of Information and Library Science. Our school and MLA have a lot in common. We are small but mighty. Everyone wants to be our partner, and we are very good at what we do. We have wonderful potential. We have a great past. We are tackling important things in the present, and we will flow into the future with great vigor. It is the continued building upon our past and present efforts that will allow us to maximize our contribution as information professionals. Throughout these changing times, it is important that we set our priorities carefully and remain focused on our mission to provide access to the best available health care knowledge. The way that we perform our task will change, but our core mission has not. We are all in this together. This is the strength of our association and our profession, and, together, we will build our future profession in all its diversity.

There is no question that we have thorny issues. We are going to talk about a lot more of those in San Antonio. We have to deal with new roles, changes in scholarly publication, and competition from other information providers, to name just a few. But thorns also have flowers. New roles, new ideas, new ways of meeting the needs of our users will emerge to the delight of our users and ourselves. Speaking with our collective voice as we are doing on Capitol Hill during this Washington meeting; advocating for our members for salary, for status, for recognition; and promoting our value through the creation of even more advocacy tools, we must continue to enable lifelong learning.

When Fred Roper, FMLA, was president, the association produced an impressive educational policy statement called Platform for Change. It is time to look at that again and create a renewed platform for change. We must continue to promote our leadership program, the Academy of Health Information Professionals. We need to continue to build and to find out ways to add value to that program. We need to partner in recruitment, research, and education. We need to continue to build and share our knowledgebase. We need to look again at our other major policy statement, our research policy statement, and use scientific evidence to improve information practice.

It is time to look at all of the resources that we have on MLANET and make use of the Task Force to Develop MLA's Center of Research and Education (CORE) to create a system for collection of educational resources. Such a collection could form that foundation for an MLA digital library that would be an expanded version of MLANET.

As I mentioned earlier, we need to recruit and retain the best. We need to bring new people in, but we also need to think about how we can continue to energize ourselves as mid-career professionals and really take advantage of the wealth of knowledge available from our senior leadership. We want to emphasize diversity, partnership, and student contact by reenergizing our virtual student chapter. We want to recruit very broadly into the field from other professions. By undertaking these sorts of initiatives, we will build a truly diverse association on many dimensions.

The phoenix rising is a recurrent image in history. The phoenix bird exists in various forms in countries all around the world, a creature that is culturally diverse and everlasting in its appeal. The phoenix is part of myths, legends, and fairy tales. The bird is always found in close connection with gods and leaders, either as their symbol or a god itself. Although the phoenix was given different names and used in different times for varied purposes, there are some features that are always similar: it has red plumage, a multicolored tail, a golden neck; is majestic in flight, just like us; and sings the most beautiful song. The phoenix is almost always associated with the sun, fire, stars, music, sublimeness, eternity, color, and palm trees. I expect the phoenix will definitely join us in 2005 in San Antonio. What a better, more triumphant image than the phoenix for us as a profession and an association to carry us all on our winding and exhilarating journey down the river! We give thanks for our past, promise to live every present moment to its fullest, and continue to flow steadily toward our Future Magnífico. Mes amis Canadiennes, my colleagues from near and far, thank you for your attention. I will see you all in San Antonio.

Reference

1. Nussbaum, Bruce. The power of design. Business Week 2004 May 17;3883:86–92,94.

At the completion of her address, Ms. Marshall invited Elaine Russo Martin, chair of the 2005 National Program Committee, to give the official thanks for the 2004 annual meeting.

Ms. Martin: Whereas, the 2004 National Program Committee has succeeded enormously in designing a program that has helped us find our center of power through powerful speakers, programming, and poster sessions during this meeting of the Medical Library Association; and

Whereas, the Local Assistance Committee has achieved extraordinary success in helping us feel a power surge as we networked with colleagues and friends in its role of providing guidance and support to the Medical Library Association membership; and

Whereas, the medical librarians and citizens of Washington, DC, have made us feel most welcome and comfortable in this city, one of the most powerful cities in the world; and

Whereas, the Medical Library Association headquarters' staff and the professional meeting planners have worked long and hard with lightning-rod speed to meet all our needs, solve all our problems, and generally assist the membership during this annual meeting,

Therefore, be it resolved that the membership of the Medical Library Association extend its profound appreciation and heartfelt thanks to the 2004 National Program Committee, the Local Assistance Committee, the medical librarians and citizens of Washington, DC, and the Medical Library Association headquarters staff and meeting planners for their outstanding efforts. May I have a round of applause?

Next Ms. Martin invited members to attend MLA '05 in San Antonio, Texas, May 14–19, 2005, where the theme will be “¡Futuro Magnífico! Celebrating Our Diversity.” The meeting will begin with continuing education courses on Saturday and Sunday, May 14 and May 15. The meeting will officially open Sunday night, a change from the usual schedule. Ms. Martin was joined by Janna Lawrence, Jonquil Feldman, Kathleen Furukawa, and others in a short skit, which was followed by a brief video about San Antonio and the shooting of flutterfetti from the audience. This concluded the official invitation to next year's meeting, and the session ended.

SECTION PROGRAMMING

Section Programming I, Sunday, May 23, 2004

Consumer and Patient Health Information and Hospital Libraries Sections

Invited Speaker Panel: Power in the Trenches

Moderator: Eris Weaver, Redwood Health Library, Petaluma, California.

Jo-Ann Benedetti, Crandall Public Library, Glens Falls, New York; Barbara Bibel, Oakland Public Library, Oakland, California; Pat Hammond, Tompkins-McCaw Library for the Health Sciences, Virginia Commonwealth University–Richmond; and Joy Kennedy, Health Resource Library, Northwest Community Healthcare, Arlington Heights, Illinois.

Educational Media and Technologies, Medical Informatics, International Cooperation, and Public Health/ Health Administration Sections

Contributed Paper Session: Educating the 21st Century Health Professional

Moderator: Rikke Ogawa, Lane Medical Library, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California.

Finding Measurement Tools “Any Time, Any Place”: An Interdisciplinary, Self-help Web Tutorial: Janet G. Schnall, Health Sciences Libraries; Angela Lee, Social Work Library; and Joanne Rich, Health Sciences Libraries; University of Washington– Seattle.

Sharing Our Power: How Librarians Can Contribute to the Lifelong Learning of Primary Care Physicians in the United Kingdom: Tamara Rader and Andrea Lane, BMJ Knowledge, BMJ Publishing Group, London, United Kingdom.

The Impact of Online Training on Information-retrieval Skills and Clinical Decision Making in a Family Medicine Clerkship: Katherine Schilling, David S. Ginn, and Joseph J. Harzbecker Jr., Alumni Medical Library; and John M. Wiecha, Department of Family Medicine; Boston Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts.

Distributed Power, Distributed Learning: Strategies for Providing Online Education for Public Health Professionals in the Digital Age: Nancy J. Allee, Helen Look, Deborah Lauseng, and Gillian Mayman, Public Health Informatics Services and Access, University of Michigan–Ann Arbor.

History of the Health Sciences and Nursing and Allied Health Resources Sections

Invited Speaker Session: The Power of Leadership

Moderator: Lynette Ralph, Swilley Library, Mercer University, Atlanta, Georgia.

Leadership and Public Health in the South: The Case of Joseph Goldberger and Pellagra: Michael Flannery, Lister Hill Library, University of Alabama–Birmingham.

The Militant Angel: Annie Goodrich and Army Nursing: Stephen Greenberg, History of Medicine Division, National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, Maryland.

The “Girl” in White?: The Real Dr. Barringer: Patricia Gallagher, Library, New York Academy of Medicine–New York.

A Curious Mind: Lucretia W. McClure, FMLA, Countway Library of Medicine, Harvard University, Boston, Massachusetts.

Hospital Libraries and Leadership and Management Sections

Contributed Paper Session: Power Rangers: Plugging into the Power

Moderator: Patricia May, Health Sciences Library, St. Joseph's Regional Medical Center, Paterson, New Jersey.

Hospital Medical Libraries: “To Be or Not to Be”: Robert T. Neumeyer, PMHS Libraries and Archives, Pittsburgh Mercy Health System, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

The Power of MOOMBA: Catherine M. Boss, Booker Health Sciences Library, Jersey Shore University Medical Center, Neptune, New Jersey.

Tailoring Information to Individual Needs: Using Systematic Search Tools to Provide the Right Information at the Right Time in the Right Way: Michelle M. Arbuckle; Audrey Friedman, Patient Education; Joyce Nyhof-Young, Education; and Pamela Catton, Oncology Education; Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Kidding Around: Integrating the Library into Pediatrics Morning Report: Elizabeth M. Smigielski and James E. Manasco, Kornhauser Health Sciences Library; and Erin M. Richey and Tracee L. Wojtkowski, Department of Pediatrics; University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky.

Medical Library Education Section

Contributed Paper Session: Emerging Ideas: The Power of Fresh Perspectives

Moderator: James Andrews, School of Library and Information Science, University of Kentucky–Lexington.

The Provision of Consumer Health Information in Rhode Island: A Comprehensive Multi-type Library Survey: Jametoria L. Burton, Research and Information Services, University of Iowa–Iowa City.

Women's Use of the Internet for Health Information: The Impact of Selected Demographic and Health Variables: Mary L. Klem, Health Sciences Library System; Ellen G. Detlefsen, School of Information Sciences; and Marsha D. Marcus, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic; University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Empowerment through Collaboration in the Classroom: Denise H. Britigan, Hardin Library for the Health Sciences; Jeffrey C. Reist, College of Pharmacy; and Vicki R. Kee, Division of Drug Information Service; University of Iowa–Iowa City.

Use of Digital Video Technology to Deliver Digital Reference: Toward a Video Reference Mode: Susan Lessick and James E. Crooks, Grunigen Medical Library, University of California– Irvine Medical Center, Orange, California, and Judy Ruttenberg, Langson Library, and Heather Tunender, Science Library, University of California–Irvine.

National Program Committee

Contributed Paper Session: Building and Maintaining Professional Power Tools: Architecture, Analysis, and Assessment

Moderator: Ruth Riley, School of Medicine Library, University of South Carolina–Columbia.

The Power of Partnership: NC Health Info and Lessons Learned as the MedlinePlus “Go Local” Prototype: Christie C. Silbajoris, Brian Hilligoss, Rachel A. Wilfert, and Diana McDuffee, North Carolina Area Health Education Center Library and Information Services Network, Health Sciences Library, University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill.

Indexing Consistency in MEDLINE: James Marcetich and Marina Rappoport, Index Section, and Sheldon Kotzin, Bibliographic Services Division, National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, Maryland.

To Empower Thy Users, Know Thy Users: Analysis of Email Correspondence to ClinicalTrials.gov: Janet Heekin, Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical Communications, National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, Maryland.

Information Power to Public Health Professionals: Hope Barton, Jim Duncan, Jean Williams Sayre, Scott Fiddelke, and Linda Roth, Hardin Library for the Health Sciences, University of Iowa–Iowa City.

Pharmacy and Drug Information Section

Invited Speaker Session: The 2004 EMBASE.com Lecture

Moderator: Virginia Stone, Health Sciences and Human Services Library, University of Maryland–Baltimore.

Drug Regulation in the United States: Carol Cavanaugh, Division of Library and Information Services, US Food and Drug Administration, Rockville, Maryland.

Public Health/Health Administration Section and African American Medical Librarians Alliance SIG

Invited and Contributed Paper Session: Mining Data for Knowledge Generation: Collecting, Using, and Promoting Data Sets

Moderator: Kristine Alpi, Public Health Library, New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, New York, New York.

Geographically Discrete Data: Mining the Internet to Find Authoritative Health Data: Helena VonVille, Library, School of Public Health, University of Texas Health Science Center– Houston.

A Data Sets Service in the Library: Overview and Evaluation: Peggy Tahir and Min-Lin Fang, The Library and Center for Knowledge Management, University of California–San Francisco.

The Future of Public Health Vocabulary and Public Health Data Standards: Vivian Auld, National Information Center on Health Services Research and Healthcare Technology, National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, Maryland, and Anna Orlova, Public Health Data Standards Consortium, Baltimore, Maryland.

Relevant Issues, Federal Libraries, and Public Services Sections

Invited Speaker Session: Affronts to Library Liberty: Legal, Ethical, and Practical Responses

Moderator: Chris Shaffer, Hardin Library for the Health Sciences, University of Iowa–Iowa City.

Affronts to Library Liberty: Legal, Ethical, and Practical Responses: Jessamyn West, Rutland Free Library, Rutland, Vermont.

Research Section and Assessment and Benchmarking and Clinical Librarians and Evidence-Based Health Care SIGs

Invited and Contributed Paper Session: The Power of Evidence (Part 1): How Benchmarking Can Make Your Point

Moderator: Elizabeth Wood, Lee Graff Medical and Scientific Library, City of Hope National Medical Center and Beckman Research Institute, Duarte, California.

Em(P)owering Your Institution through Benchmarking: A Mixed-model Approach to Assessment: Douglas J. Joubert, Robert B. Greenblatt Library, Medical College of Georgia–Augusta.

Using Outcome Measures to Assess the Information-seeking Behavior of Clinicians after Access to Online Resources: A Longitudinal Cohort Study: Nancy H. Tannery, Information Services; Charles B. Wessel, Affiliated Hospital Services; Barbara A. Epstein, Health Sciences Library System; and Cynthia S. Gadd, Center for Biomedical Informatics; University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Selecting the Best Book and Journal Titles for Support of Clinical Dentistry: Evidence-based Decisions: Frank Mason, Wilson Dental Library, University of Southern California–Los Angeles.

Participant Observation and Grounded Theory: Michelynn McKnight, Health Sciences Library, Norman Regional Hospital, Norman, Oklahoma.

Veterinary Medical Libraries Section and Vision Science SIG

Invited and Contributed Paper Session: The Power of Independence: Information for Owners of Service Animals

Moderator: Sarah Murphy, Veterinary Medicine Library, Ohio State University–Columbus.

Institutional Policies for Service Animals in the Era of the Americans with Disabilities Act: Judith Schaeffer Young, Kelman Library, Wills Eye Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Fidos for Freedom: John Dietrichs, Fidos for Freedom, Elkridge, Maryland.

Section Programming II, Monday, May 24, 2004

Cancer Librarians, Relevant Issues, and Research Sections and Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgendered Health Sciences Librarians SIG

Invited and Contributed Paper Session: Making Critical Decisions: End-of-life Health Care

Moderator: Tanya Smith, Cancer Learning Center, Huntsman Cancer Institute, Salt Lake City, Utah.

The Means to a Better End: Collection Development in the Medical Library to Support Compassionate End-of-life Care: Susan A. Byars, Hospice Library, Hospice of the Bluegrass, Lexington, Kentucky, and Edwina (Winn) Theirl, Chandler Medical Center Library, University of Kentucky–Lexington.

Introducing Information Resources to Improve End-of-life Care: A Collaborative Training Effort: Susan A. Byars, Hospice Library, Hospice of the Bluegrass, Lexington, Kentucky, and Edwina (Winn) Theirl, Chandler Medical Center Library, University of Kentucky–Lexington.

Making Critical Decisions: Medical Librarians and End-of-life Health Care: Nancy Boucot Cummings, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Washington, DC.

Chiropractic Libraries and Public Health/Health Administration Sections

Invited and Contributed Paper Session: Eco-Power: Taking Back the Environment

Moderator: Marcia Thomas, Ruth R. Cleveland Memorial Library, Cleveland Chiropractic College, Kansas City, Missouri.

What's the Environment Got to Do with Our Health?: Barbara Sattler, Environmental Health Education Center, School of Nursing, University of Maryland–Baltimore.

A Collaborative Approach to Introduce Information Professionals to Bioterrorism Issues and Resources: Shari Clifton, Ursula Ellis, and Susan Sanders, Robert M. Bird Health Sciences Library; Daniel Boatright, College of Public Health; and Clinton M. Thompson Jr., Robert M. Bird Health Sciences Library; University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center–Oklahoma City.

Power to the People: Health Information and Environmental Justice: Gale Dutcher, Division of Specialized Information Services, National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, Maryland.

Collection Development and Pharmacy and Drug Information Sections and Molecular Biology and Genomics SIG

Invited Speaker Session: Building Your Power Base: Collection Development in Molecular Biology and Bioinformatics

Moderator: Michael Lee Newman, Falconer Biology Library, Stanford University, Stanford, California.

Seize the Power of Bioinformatics: New Strategies: David Osterbur, Biological Labs Library, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Biological Information Resource: Mark Minie, Health Sciences Libraries, University of Washington–Seattle.

Selection of Resources for the Development of an Information Service Program in Molecular Biology and Genetics: Ansuman Chattopadhyay, Health Sciences Library System, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Consumer and Patient Health Information and Nursing and Allied Health Resources Sections and Mental Health SIG

Contributed Paper Session: The Power of Collaboration

Moderator: Naomi Broering, FMLA, FNLM Update, Friends of the National Library of Medicine, La Jolla, California.

The Health Sciences Library System Consumer Collection: A Public/Academic Partnership for Consumer Health Information: Deborah Silverman and Barbara A. Epstein, University of Pittsburgh Health Sciences Library System; Michelle Burda, and Michele Klein-Fedyshin, Library Services, UPMC Shadyside; and Gretchen Maxeiner Millis and Ester Saghafi, Health Sciences Library System; University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

A Public–Private Partnership to Improve the Health-related Information-seeking Skills of Mental Health Consumers and Staff: Mary A. McKeon Blanchard, Keven Jeffery, and David S. Ginn, Alumni Medical Library, Boston University Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts.

Tribal College Libraries: An Opportunity for Collaboration in Bringing Quality Health Information to Native Americans: Judith Rieke, Library of the Health Sciences, University of North Dakota–Grand Forks; Quincee Baker, Library, Fort Berthold Community College, New Town, North Dakota; Myrna DeMarce, Valerie Merrick Memorial Library, Cankdeska Cikana Community College, Fort Totten, North Dakota; Tom Eggers, Library, Turtle Mountain Community College, Belcourt, North Dakota; Mark Holman, Library, Sitting Bull College, Fort Yates, North Dakota; and Charlene Weis, Library, United Tribes Technical College, Bismarck, North Dakota.

From Handouts to Hard Dollars: Sustaining Consumer Health Projects with Collaboration and Partnerships: Linda Phillips, CLIC-on-Health, and Kathleen M. Miller, Rochester Regional Library Council, Fairport, New York, and Julia F. Sollenberger, Health Science Libraries and Technologies, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York.

Hospital Libraries Section

Invited Speaker Session: Thunder Claps and Lightning Bolts

Moderator: Catherine Mary Boss, Library Services, Meridian Health System, Jersey Shore Medical Center, Neptune, New Jersey.

The Day That Comet Died: The Demise of Paper and the Rise of Electronic Document Delivery in New Jersey: The Health Sciences Library Association of New Jersey Solution: Robert Mackes, Schering-Plough Library of Science and Medicine, Union Hospital, Union, New Jersey; Elaine Goldman, Medical Library, Pascack Valley Hospital, Westwood, New Jersey; Patricia Regenberg, Health Sciences Library, Mountainside Hospital, Montclair, New Jersey; Barbara Reich, Medical Library, Hackensack University Medical Center, Hackensack, New Jersey; and Michelle Volesko, Library and Corporate Information Services, New Jersey Hospital Association–Princeton.

Finding the Silver Lining: What “Crisis Management” Can Teach Us: Elaine Wells, Kohn Vision Science Library, College of Optometry, State University of New York–New York.

International Cooperation and Federal Libraries Sections

Invited and Contributed Paper Session: International Cooperation: The Power of Sister Libraries

Moderator: Donna Flake, Health Sciences Library, Coastal Area Health Education Center, Wilmington, North Carolina.

Health Library Partnership Programs: An Overview: Lenny Rhine, Health Science Center Libraries, University of Florida–Gainesville.

The Role of the Sister Library Project in the Development of the Medical Research Library of Latvia: Velta Poznaka, Medical Research Library of Latvia, Riga, Latvia.

Sister Libraries: Moving Forward: Glendine Smith, Library, Holberton Hospital, St. Johns, West Indies, Antigua and Barbuda, and Ellen Sayed, and Justin Robertson, Biomedical Library, University of South Alabama–Mobile.

ALA's Sister Libraries/Bibliotecas Hermanas Initiative: Michael Dowling, Chapter Relations Office and International Relations Office, American Library Association, Chicago, Illinois.

Leadership and Management, Corporate Information Services, and Public Services Sections and Assessment and Benchmarking SIG

Invited Speaker Session: Paths to Power (Part 1): Influencing and Negotiating Skills: How to Get People to Do What You Want

Moderator: Jane Blumenthal, Dahlgren Memorial Library, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, DC.

Influencing and Negotiating Skills: How to Get People to Do What You Want: Lynn Waymon, Waymon & Associates, Silver Spring, Maryland.

Medical Informatics and Medical Library Education Sections

Invited Speaker Session: Power Partners: What Medical Informatics Can Do for Medical Librarians and What Librarians Can Do for Informatics

Moderator: Catherine Arnott Smith, School of Information Studies, Syracuse University, Syracuse, New York.

What Else Is New? Redefining Librarians' Roles in Technology: Elizabeth Wood, Lee Graff Medical and Scientific Library, City of Hope National Medical Center and Beckman Research Institute, Duarte, California

Two Roads Diverged: The Yellow Wood of Knowledge Informatics: Julie McGowan, Ruth Lilly Medical Library, Indiana University School of Medicine–Indianapolis.

Bioinformatics and Biomedical Information Science and Technology Initiative (BISTI): New Opportunities to Unite Health Librarians and Informatics: Charles Friedman, Division of Extramural Programs, National Library of Medicine (on leave from the University of Pittsburgh), Bethesda, Maryland.

Medical Informatics Panel Discussion: Panel discussion with Elizabeth Wood, Julie McGowan, and Charles Friedman.

Nursing and Allied Health Resources Section and African American Medical Librarians Alliance SIG

Contributed Paper Session: Sharing the Power (Part 1): Delivery of Effective Instruction

Moderator: Rosalind Lett, Rx Knowledge, Brentwood, Tennessee.

Learning Intervention in Literature Search Instruction Assessed with a Rubric Instrument: Claudia Lascar, Library; Doreen V. Kagan, Educational Affairs; João V. Nunes, Behavioral Medicine; and George E. Brandon, Sophie Davis School of Biomedical Education; City College of New York, New York, New York.

Imparting the Power of the Library to the College of Nursing: Alice Weber, Spenser S. Eccles Health Sciences Library, University of Utah–Salt Lake City.

A Bridge across the State: Establishing an Electrifying Connection between an Historically Black College and an Academic Health Sciences Center: Pamela J. Sherwill-Navarro, Health Sciences Library, and Gloria A. McWhirter, College of Nursing, University of Florida–Gainesville.

Knowledge among Health Care Professionals of Evidence-based Answers to Complex Clinical Questions: Rebecca Jerome, Eskind Biomedical Library; S. Trent Rosenbloom, Department of Biomedical Informatics; and Nunzia Bettinsoli Giuse, Eskind Biomedical Library; Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee.

Research Section and Assessment and Benchmarking and Clinical Librarians and Evidence-Based Health Care SIGs

Invited and Contributed Paper Session: The Power of Evidence (Part 2): Discovering Our Effectiveness with Outcomes

Moderator: Lyn Dennison, Greenblatt Library, Medical College of Georgia–Augusta.

Meeting the Two-minute Standard for Timely Digital Library Use in Medical Education and Hospital/Clinic Environments: Analysis of a Convenience Sample: Steven L. MacCall, School of Library and Information Studies, University of Alabama–Tuscaloosa.

Library as Place: Results of a Delphi Study: Logan Ludwig, Medical Center Library, Stritch School of Medicine, Loyola University, Maywood, Illinois, and Susan Starr, Biomedical Library, University of California–San Diego, La Jolla, California.

Defining and Measuring Library Contributions to Institutional Goals: William Nelson, Reese Library, Augusta State University, Augusta, Georgia.

Technical Services, Educational Media and Technologies, and Health Association Libraries Sections

Invited and Contributed Paper Session: Lighting the Path: Digital Repositories in the Real World

Moderator: Junie Janzen, OU-Tulsa Library, University of Oklahoma–Tulsa.

Eighteen Months and Counting…A Report from Trenches: Rea Devakos, Gerstein Science Information Centre, Library, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Feeling Around in the Dark: Establishing the Role of the Library in a Campus-wide Digitization Project: Mary E. Piorun, James Comes, Jennifer Varney, Lisa Palmer, and Janet Dadoly, Lamar Soutter Library; and Gary Langevin, Academic Computing; University of Massachusetts Medical School–Worcester.

Health and Life Sciences Collection Promotes Collaboration throughout University by Providing Digital Resources for Teaching: Brenda Seago, School of Medicine; Susan Deihl, School of Social Work; John Bigbee and Alice Pakurar, Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology; and Chris Stephens, Office of Faculty and Instructional Development, School of Medicine; Virginia Commonwealth University–Richmond.

Digital Archives at the National Library of Medicine: Diane Boehr, Cataloging Unit, National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, Maryland.

Section Programming III, May 25, 2005

Collection Development and Technical Services Sections

Invited and Contributed Paper Session: Cease the Power: Libraries and the Open Access Movement

Moderator: Sandra Kendall, Sidney Liswood Library, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Full Speed Ahead: Scholarly Publishing Issues in the Science, Technology, and Medicine Marketplace (and How to Explain It to Your Faculty): Julie A. Schneider and Allan Barclay, Health Sciences Libraries, University of Wisconsin–Madison.

Cease the Power: One Step at a Time: Mary L. Ryan, UAMS Library, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences–Little Rock.

Promoting Open Access on a Health Sciences Campus: Peggy Tahir, Annaliese Taylor, and Gail Persily, The Library and Center for Knowledge Management, University of California– San Francisco.

Consumer and Patient Health Information, Cancer Librarians, History of the Health Sciences, and Relevant Issues Sections

Contributed Paper Session: Power to the Patient: New Definitions of Health Literacy

Moderator: Eris Weaver, Redwood Health Library, Petaluma, California.

Keeping It Real: Using the Natural Language of Sexual Health Information to Empower Urban Adolescent Health Consumers: Nicola J. Cecchino and Holly A. Harden, Welch Medical Library; and Susan Rohner, Lilienfeld Library; Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland.

Healthy People: Maria Sosa, Healthy People Library Project, US Department of Health and Human Services.

Accessing Information about Individual Health Insurance from “Quote” Websites: Kui Chun Su, Health Management and Informatics, and MaryEllen C. Sievert, School of Information Science and Learning Technology, University of Missouri– Columbia.

The 24 Languages Audiofile Project: T. Elizabeth Workman, Hope Fox Eccles Health Sciences Library, and Nancy T. Lombardo, Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library, University of Utah–Salt Lake City.

Corporate Information Services and Leadership and Management Sections and Assessment and Benchmarking SIG

Invited Speaker Session: Paths to Power (Part 2): Empowerment by the Numbers: Using Your Data to Negotiate with Administrators

Moderator: Mindy Paquette-Murphy, Sanofi-Synthelabo Research, Malvern, Pennsylvania.

Power Grids and the Direction of the Current: Eileen Stanley, Library Services, Allina Hospital & Clinics, Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Making Both the Business and Quality Case for Clinical Information Innovation: Linda Hogan, Information Services Division, Pittsburgh Mercy Health System/Catholic Health East, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Designing a Powerful Library: A Case Study in Reorganization: Laurie L. Thompson, and Brian Bunnett, Libraries, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center–Dallas.

Transforming an Academic Health Sciences Library through the Creation and Implementation of a Strategic Marketing Plan: Joan B. Schlimgen, Arizona Health Sciences Library, University of Arizona–Tucson.

Dental, Educational Media and Technologies, and Pharmacy and Drug Information Sections

Invited and Contributed Paper Session: PowerPack: Innovations in Packaging Online Curricula

Moderator: Douglas Varner, Health Sciences Library, California Pacific Medical Center–San Francisco.

Effective Leadership and Advocacy: Amplifying Professional Citizenship: Cynthia Boyle, School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland–Baltimore.

You Want Me to Do What to That Patient?: Leonard Litkowski, Department of Restorative Dentistry, Dental School, University of Maryland–Baltimore.

eCurriculum: A Powerful Way to Provide Content for Medical Education: Brenda Seago, Computer Based Instruction Lab; Robby Reynolds and Anita Navarro, Curriculum Office; and Jeanne Schlesinger and Chris Stephens, Office of Faculty and Instructional Development; School of Medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University–Richmond.

Totally Modular Dude! Empowered Educational Technology: Bart Ragon and Karen Knight, Claude Moore Health Sciences Library, University of Virginia–Charlottesville.

Health Association Libraries and Hospital Libraries Sections and Mental Health SIG

Invited Speaker Session: Enhancing Aging: Resisting the Power Outages of Late Life

Moderator: Carmen Bou-Crick, Louis Calder Memorial Library and Pomerance Library and Resource Center, School of Medicine, University of Miami, Miami, Florida.

Enhancing Aging: Resisting the Power Outages of Late Life: Carl Eisdorfer, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, Florida.

History of the Health Sciences, Health Association Libraries, International Cooperation, Public Health/ Health Administration, and Veterinary Medical Libraries Sections

Contributed Paper Session: Emerging Infectious and Zoonotic Diseases: The Power of Disease on Society

Moderator: Katherine Oomens, Lister Hill Library of Health Sciences, University of Alabama–Birmingham.

Information Pathways during the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) Crisis in a Sydney Metropolitan Hospital: Rolf H. Schafer, Walter McGrath Library, and Paul C. Smollen, Infection Control Department, St. Vincents Hospital Sydney, Darlinghurst, New South Wales, Australia.

Reemerging Infectious Diseases: A Comprehensive Investigation of the Adequacy of Medical Literature Coverage: Pauline Todd, Taneya Koonce, Jennifer Ann Lyon, Mary Teloh, and Nunzia Bettinsoli Giuse, Eskind Biomedical Library, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee.

Canary in a Haystack: Building a Database of Animal Sentinel Literature: Matthew Wilcox, Epidemiology and Public Health Library, School of Public Health; Daniel Chudnov, Center for Medical Informatics, School of Medicine; Brynn Taylor, School of Public Health, School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, School of Medicine; Zimra Gordon, School of Public Health, School of Medicine, Rippowan Animal Hospital; Prakash Nadkarni, Center for Medical Informatics, School of Medicine; and Peter Rabinowitz, Occupational Medicine, School of Medicine; Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut.

Medical Informatics Section and Molecular Biology and Genomics SIG

Contributed Paper Session: Sharing the Power (Part 2): Bioinformatics Education and the Library

Moderator: Michael Lee Newman, Falconer Biology Library, Stanford University, Stanford, California.

A Library-based Bioinformatics Educational Program for Students, Researchers, and Clinicians: Michele R. Tennant, Health Science Center Libraries and UF Genetics Institute, University of Florida–Gainesville.

Building a Community of Bioinformatics Practice through Library Education Programs: Barrie E. Hayes, K.T.L. Vaughan, and Margaret E. Moore, Health Sciences Library, University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill.

Building a National Bioinformatics Education Program for Library Staff: Design, Results, and the Future: Renata Geer, National Center for Biotechnology Information, National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, Maryland.

Public Health/Health Administration Section and Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgendered Health Sciences Librarians SIG

Invited and Contributed Paper Session: The Power of National and International Health Initiatives

Moderator: Ammon Ripple, Health Sciences Library System, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Healthy People 2010 in Action: Using National Partnerships to Address the Needs of Individuals with Limb Loss: Leslie J. Duncan, National Limb Loss Information Center, Amputee Coalition of America, Knoxville, Tennessee.

AZHealthInfo: Improving Arizona's Public Health Infrastructure: Patricia A. Auflick, Arizona Health Sciences Library, University of Arizona–Tucson; Michael Kronenfeld, Learning Resources Center, A. T. Still University of the Health Sciences, Mesa, Arizona; and Jeanette C. McCray, Arizona Health Sciences Library, University of Arizona–Tucson.

The Power to Influence Health Policy: Anthony Silvestre, Department of Infectious Diseases and Microbiology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Public Services Section

Contributed Paper Session: Influencing Change: Recharging the Roles of Reference and Public Services

Moderator: Pauline Fulda, Library, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center–New Orleans.

Modifying the Role of the Reference Librarian at the Virtual Desk: Sandra L. De Groote, Library of the Health Sciences, University of Illinois–Chicago; Josephine L. Dorsch, Library of the Health Sciences–Peoria, University of Illinois–Peoria; and Scott Collard and Carol Scherrer, Library of the Health Sciences, University of Illinois–Chicago.

Representing the Voice of the Library Patron in a Digital World: Kathleen F. Bauer, Cushing/Whitney Medical Library, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut.

High Voltage Reference Services: Reinventing Reference in the Digital Age: Gillian Goldsmith Mayman and Jonathan Koffel, Public Health Informatics Services and Access, University of Michigan–Ann Arbor.

It's Not about a Desk: Joe Jaros, Christine Foster, and Martha Bedard, Medical Sciences Library, Texas A&M University– College Station.

Research Section

Invited Speaker Session: Evidence-based Librarianship: Step-by-step from Those Who Have Done It

Moderator: Elizabeth Wood, Lee Graff Medical and Scientific Library, City of Hope National Medical Center and Beckman Research Institute, Duarte, California.

The Randomized Controlled Trial: Not Such a Daunting Task: Jonathan Eldredge, Health Sciences Library, University of New Mexico–Albuquerque.

Planning and Implementing a Systematic Review of the Literature: Gary Byrd, Health Sciences Library, University of New York– Buffalo.

The Ten Thousand Questions Project: An Attempt to Address the “Consumer Vocabulary Problem”: Catherine Arnott Smith, School of Information Studies, Syracuse University, Syracuse, New York.

Learning from LibQUAL+: What Three Years of Data Teaches Us: James Shedlock and Linda Walton, Galter Health Sciences Library, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois.

MORNING OF INNOVATION

Wednesday, May 26, 2004

The MLA 2004 NPC provided a unique opportunity by inviting two or more MLA units (sections, committees, task forces, chapters, etc.) to partner and develop programming that focused on “innovative” solutions, thinking, resources, and services. Any combination of units was acceptable. The following three concurrent sessions were held from 10:00 a.m. to noon as part of the Morning of Innovation.

Collection Development, Technical Services, and Public Services Sections

Invited Papers Session: Cease the Power: Returning Scientific Publishing to the Academy

Presenters: Mark E. Funk, Samuel J. Wood Library, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York; Helen J. Doyle, Public Library of Science, San Francisco, California; Chi V. Dang, School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland; and Linda Watson, Claude Moore Health Sciences Library, University of Virginia–Charlottesville.

MLA Board of Directors, Task Force on Expert Searching, Health Information Literacy Task Force, Task Force on the Information Specialist in Context, and Clinical Librarians and Evidence-Based Health Care SIG

Invited Posters and a Town Meeting with a Moderator and Panel of Poster Presenters: Filtering without Fear: The Librarian's Role in Distilling Knowledge

Presenters: Patricia L. Thibodeau, Medical Center Library, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina; Rebecca Jerome, Eskind Biomedical Library, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee; Susan Meadows, Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Missouri–Columbia; Martha Harris, VERDICT, Audie Murphy Memorial VA Hospital, San Antonio, Texas; Robert Swain, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia; Kathleen Oliver, Welch Medical Library, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland; Clinical Librarians and Evidence-based Health Care SIG; Task Force on Expert Searching; Health Information Literacy Task Force; and Task Force on the Information Specialist in Context.

Professional Recruitment and Retention Committee (Ad hoc), Relevant Issues and Medical Library Education Sections; Membership Committee; and African American Medical Librarians Alliance and Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgendered Health Sciences Librarians SIGs

Three Contributed Papers and One Discussion Session: Seize the Power of the Next Generation: Innovative Ways to Recruit Young and Diverse Librarians

Presenters: Elizabeth Irish, Schaffer Library of the Health Sciences, Albany Medical College, Albany, New York; Jana Bradley, FMLA, School of Information Studies, Syracuse University, Syracuse, New York; Ellen Detlefsen, Department of Library and Information Science, School of Information Sciences, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; and Kathryn Skhal, Carlson Health Sciences Library, University of California–Davis, and student, LEEP, University of Illinois–Urbana-Champaign.

POSTER PRESENTATIONS

Poster presentations were scheduled three separate times at the annual meeting.

Monday, May 24, 2004, 2:00 p.m. to 3:30 p.m

MP01) Assessing Medical Student Informatics Competencies: Brynn E. Mays and Jane L. Blumenthal, Dahlgren Memorial Library; Jeffrey M. Weinfeld, Department of Family Medicine; and Marcus A. Banks and Janette Shaffer, Dahlgren Memorial Library; Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, DC.

MP02) Power of Improved Practice: Taking Information Management Education to the Next Level: Jeanne Sadlik and Logan Ludwig, Loyola Health Sciences Library, Stritch School of Medicine, Loyola University Chicago, Maywood, Illinois.

MP03) Library Support of the Service-learning Curriculum in an Academic Medical Center: Marcus A. Banks, Dahlgren Memorial Library, and Donna D. Cameron, Department of Family Medicine, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, DC.

MP04) Internet Web-based Materials in Family Medicine Education: A National Survey: Helen G. Mayo, UT Southwestern Library; Cassie L. Murphey-Cullen, Alice K. Marcee, and Gregory W. Schneider, UT Southwestern Family Practice Residency Program; Richard V. King, UT Southwestern BioMedical Communications; and Robert D. Frey, UT Southwestern Family Practice Residency Program; University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center–Dallas.

MP05) Empowering Preceptors for Teaching with Technology: A Change in Practice: Brenda Seago, Computer Based Instruction Lab, and Judy Gary, Department of Family Practice, School of Medicine; Shannon Jones, Tompkins-McCaw Library; Dan Han, Computer Based Instruction Lab, and Chris Stephens, Office of Faculty and Instructional Development, School of Medicine; Indra Kancitis, Department of Pediatrics; and Rita Willett, Foundations of Clinical Medicine Course; Virginia Commonwealth University–Richmond.

MP06) Multidisciplinary Medical Case Study Development for First-year Medical Students: Dan Kipnis, Tony Frisby, and Liz Mikita, Academic Information Services and Research, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

MP07) Combined Power: Integration of Medical Informatics Curriculum into Problem-based Learning Course for First-year Medical Students: Laura Abate, Anne Linton, and Patricia Wilson, Himmelfarb Health Sciences Library, The George Washington University, Washington, DC.

MP08) Improved Practice: Distributed Library Instruction to Nursing Students: Kate Finkelstein, Dahlgren Memorial Library, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, DC; and Marie Reidelbach and Alison Bobal, McGoogan Library of Medicine, University of Nebraska Medical Center– Omaha.

MP09) “Having an Information Problem? We'll Help You Lick it!” The Library Survivor Tour: Marilyn A. Rosen and Angela Dixon, Edward G. Miner Library, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York.

MP10) Information Literacy for Med I Students: Testing Their Knowledge and Our Effectiveness: Melissa L. Just and Eileen Eandi, Norris Medical Library, University of Southern California–Los Angeles.

MP11) The Clinical Connections Program: A Chance to Seize the Power and Profit from Collaboration: Karen V. Knight, Gabriel R. Rios, Andrea S. Horne, Elaine May Attridge, and Gretchen Naisawald Arnold, Claude Moore Health Sciences Library, University of Virginia Health System–Charlottesville.

MP12) Power of the Nursing Shortage: Keydi M. Boss, Bartholomew Medial Library, Holy Name Hospital, Teaneck, New Jersey.

MP13) Withdrawn.

MP14) End User Empowerment: Selecting and Integrating a Clinical Electronic Reference Based on Clinician Choice: The Numbers Speak Volumes: Terrie R. Wheeler, Library and Medical Media, VA Pittsburgh HealthCare System, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; Mary E. Nourse, Medical Library, Erie VA Medical Center, Erie, Pennsylvania; and Robert S. Lyle, Medical Library, Philadelphia VA Medical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

MP15) Seizing the Power of Collaboration and Partnership in Educating the 21st Century Nurses: Robert M. Joven, Lyman Maynard Stowe Library, University of Connecticut Health Center–Farmington.

MP16) Students Find Power in Their Palm: Personal Digital Assistant in a Clinical Rotation: Jeanne Marie Le Ber, Nancy T. Lombardo, John Bramble, Spenser S. Eccles Health Sciences Library; and Christopher Maloney, Pediatrics; University of Utah–Salt Lake City.

MP17) Continuing Education as a Catalyst for Interprofessional Collaboration: Margaret Allen, Peg Allen Library Consultant, Stratford, Wisconsin; Susan Jacobs, Bobst Library, New York University–New York; June Levy, Glendale Adventist Medical Center Library, Cinahl Information Systems, Glendale, California; Susan Pierce, College of Nursing, Northwestern State University, Shreveport, Louisiana; Diane Pravikoff, Interagency Council on Information Resources for Nursing, Cinahl Information Systems, Glendale, California; and Annelle Tanner, Health Care Information Management, Office of Public Health Region 6, Northwestern State University College of Nursing, Alexandria, Louisiana.

MP18) Clinical Librarianship in an Internal Medicine Residency Program: Answering Clinical Questions to Support Patient Care: Laurie J. Schwing and Elizabeth Coldsmith, Library Services, PinnacleHealth System, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania.

MP19) Regional Medical Library Funding Fuels Consumer Health Initiatives: Mary Henning, National Network of Libraries of Medicine, MidContinental Region, University of Wyoming Libraries–Laramie, and Siobhan Champ-Blackwell, National Network of Libraries of Medicine, MidContinental Region, Creighton University Health Sciences Library, Omaha, Nebraska.

MP20) “This Book Changed My Life”: Outcomes-based Evaluation in a Community Health Library: Christine W. Allen, Community Health Library, Munson Medical Center, Traverse City, Michigan.

MP21) Empowering Health Information Consumers through Local Public Libraries: Sally M. Patrick and John C. Bramble, Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library, University of Utah–Salt Lake City.

MP22) EMPOWER the People: Rural Public Libraries and Academic Outreach Supercharge Electronic Health Information Access: Ann Duesing, Health Sciences Library, University of Virginia–Wise.

MP23) Sharing the Power: Adopting a Grade School Library: Mary E. Helms, Stuart Dayton, Teresa Hartman, and Sheryl Williams, McGoogan Library of Medicine, University of Nebraska Medical Center–Omaha.

MP24) The Role of Academic Health Sciences Libraries in the Promotion of Early Literacy: A Prescription for Success: Shari Clifton and Robin Insalaco, Robert M. Bird Health Sciences Library, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center–Oklahoma City; Cindy Sharp, Watson W. Wise Medical Research Library, University of Texas Health Center–Tyler; and Susan Sanders and Ursula Ellis, Robert M. Bird Health Sciences Library, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center– Oklahoma City.

MP25) The Heart of the Matter: Improving Health Information Access in Rhode Island: Ruthann Gildea, Library, Butler Hospital, Providence, Rhode Island, and Mary Ann Slocomb, Lifespan Libraries, Rhode Island Hospital/Lifespan, Providence, Rhode Island.

MP26) NC Health Info: The First Model “MedlinePlus Goes Local” Website: Christie C. Silbajoris, Brian Hilligoss, and Diana McDuffee, Health Sciences Library, University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill.

MP27) The Power of Improved Practice in Action: Assembling the Health Information Mosaic in Saskatchewan: Janet Bangma, Health Sciences Library, University of Saskatchewan–Saskatoon, Canada, and Susan Powelson, Health Sciences Library, Regina Qu'Appelle Health Region, Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada.

MP28) Informing Neighborhood Health: Jeffrey T. Huber, School of Library and Information Studies, and Teresa J. Walsh, College of Nursing, Texas Woman's University–Houston; and Beatriz Varman, Houston Academy of Medicine-Texas Medical Center Library, Houston, Texas.

MP29) Collection Development through Visualization: Map Library Holdings and the Community Served Using Graphic Information Systems: Elizabeth LaRue, School of Information Science, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

MP30) Pathway through the Electronic Maze: Alice B. Kuller, Health Sciences Library System, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

MP31) The Power of Online Searching with Words, Phrases, and MeSH: helen-ann brown, Daniel Cleary, Diana Delgado, and Louise Falzon, Weill Cornell Medical Library, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York.

MP32) Using the Principles of “The Tipping Point” to Enhance Library Services: Patricia Vaughn, Elaine M. Attridge, Gretchen Naisawald Arnold, Karen Knight, and Kelly Near, Claude Moore Health Sciences Library, University of Virginia–Charlottesville.

MP33) Delivering Distance Training to Rural Health Care Professionals: Jie Li, Judy F. Burnham, Justin C. Robertson, and Thomas L. Williams Sr., Biomedical Library, University of South Alabama–Mobile.

MP34) What Is the Relationship between Eating Bananas and Searching Ovid MEDLINE? Or, Feed Them, and They Will Learn!: Marilyn A. Rosen, Edward G. Miner Library, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York.

MP35) MeSH Mapping of Medical Acronyms across Selected Systems: A Comparative Study: Mary Shultz, Library of the Health Sciences-Urbana, University of Illinois–Chicago, Urbana, Illinois.

MP36) New Tool for Displaying the Search Results from PubMed as a Matrix: Bradley W. Otterson, NIH Library, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland.

MP37) Reinventing the Library Orientation as an Information Fair: A Collaborative Venture: Carlos I. Rodriguez, Frank Campbell, Melanie Cedrone, D'Maris Coffman, Bentley Jenson, Varvara Kountouzi, Gretchen Kuntz, Sherry Morgan, Linda Rosenstein, and Anne Seymour, Biomedical Library; and Rod MacNeil, School of Medicine Information Services; University of Pennsylvania–Philadelphia.

MP38) Everyone Benefits from Clear Communication: How Can a Hospital Library Be a Catalyst for Plain Language?: Carolyn J. Paul, Deborah Jameson, Julia Whelan, and Elizabeth Schneider, Treadwell Library, Massachusetts General Hospital–Boston.

MP39) Health Literacy and Consumers: From Theory to Practice: Michelle Ochillo, Arizona Health Sciences Library, University of Arizona–Tucson.

MP40) Seize the Power: Librarian Roles in Developing and Implementing Enterprise-wide Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act Training: Shelley Bader, Educational Resources, and Alexandra Gomes, Himmelfarb Library, George Washington University Medical Center, Washington, DC.

MP41) The State of Eating Disorders Research Publications 1980– 2000: An Empirical Analysis: Mary J. Markland, Harley E. French Library of the Health Sciences; and Stephen A. Wonderlich, James E. Mitchell, Ross D. Crosby, and Martina de Zwaan, School of Medicine & Health Sciences; University of North Dakota–Fargo.

MP42) Development of the INASP Health Links Website, a Gateway to More than 600 Selected Websites for Health Professionals, Medical Library Communities, Publishers, and Nongovernmental Organizations in Developing and Transitional Countries: Lenny Rhine, Health Science Center Libraries, University of Florida–Gainesville.

MP43) Pestilence throughout the Ages: Patricia A. Auflick and Andrew A. Padua, Arizona Health Sciences Library, University of Arizona–Tucson.

MP44) A Reusable Template for Evaluating Point-of-care Information Products: Patricia Weiss Friedman and Andrea M. Ketchum, Health Sciences Library System, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

MP45) Consumer Health Information Websites: The State of the Art: Andrea Ketchum, Health Sciences Library System, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Tuesday, May 25, 2004, 10:00 a.m. to noon

TA01) PDA Power at the Bedside: A Comparison of the Use of 5 Minute Clinical Consult by Medical and Physician Assistant Students and Residents: Patricia Wilson, Richard Billingsley, and Leah Pellegrino, Himmelfarb Health Sciences Library, The George Washington University, Washington, DC.

TA02) Forging New Relationships: Nurses' Perception of Nursing Research in a Community Hospital, a Collaborative Project with the Nursing Department: Robin D. Siegel, Medical Library, and Julie Shocksnider, Maternal-Child Services, CentraState HealthCare System, Freehold, New Jersey.

TA03) PDA Medical Sources: Handheld Power Bringing Information to the Point of Care or Need: helen-ann brown, Weill Cornell Medical Library, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York, and Rebecca Levine, Weill Cornell Medical College, Pratt Institute Graduate School of Information and Library Science, New York, New York.

TA04) The Power to Practice: Development of an Opinion Database Related to Scope of Practice for New York State Registered Nurses: Warren G. Hawkes, Library/Records Management, New York State Nurses Association–Latham.

TA05) Transitioning a Successful Clinical Informationist Model from an Inpatient to an Outpatient Setting: Molly Cahall and Nunzia B. Giuse, Eskind Biomedical Library; and Dario A. Giuse, Informatics Center/Biomedical Informatics Department; Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee.

TA06) Addressing the Needs of the People: Developing an Educational and Administrative Website for a Pediatrics Department: Sarah T. Wright, Health Sciences Library, University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill.

TA07) Integrating Library Instruction into an Evidence-based Pharmacology Class with a Problem-based Approach: Implementation and Assessment: Irena Bond, Alice Gardner, and Mariana Lapidus, Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences–Worcester.

TA08) Learning from Afar: Distance Education Degree Opportunities for the Working Health Sciences Paraprofessional: Kathryn J. Skhal, Carlson Health Sciences Library, University of California–Davis.

TA09) Effects of Geographic Factors on the Education and Training of Health Sciences Librarians in the Mid-Atlantic States: W. John MacMullen, School of Information and Library Science, University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill.

TA10) Have Mobile Videobroadcasting Unit, Will Travel: Training Librarians to Offer “Any Place, Any Time” Classes and Events via Streaming Video: Sharon E. Dennis, Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library, University of Utah–Salt Lake City.

TA11) CHARTing Local Health Data: Teaching Librarians Statistical Tools for Public Health Research: Helena VonVille, Library, School of Public Health, University of Texas Health Science Center–Houston, and Deborah Halsted, Houston Academy of Medicine-Texas Medical Center Library, Houston, Texas.

TA12) An Objectives Scale to Evaluate MEDLINE Searches: Russell Smith, Norris Medical Library, University of Southern California–Los Angeles.

TA13) Focus on the Goal: Designing a MEDLINE Guide for a Digital Library: Carol Mita, Countway Library of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.

TA14) Public Services Librarian I: Cynthia McClellan and Janice Skica, Health Sciences Library at Stratford, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey–Stratford.

TA15) Sharing the Power: Training Consumer Health Information Center Volunteers Online: Kathleen A. McGraw and Jean Blackwell, Health Sciences Library, University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill; Julie Sweedler, Women's Health Information Center, NC Women's Hospital, Chapel Hill, North Carolina; and Mary W. White and Angelique Jenks-Brown, Health Sciences Library, University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill.

TA16) Utilizing the Power of Continuous Process Improvement in Technical Services: Lisa Palmer, Barbara Ingrassia, and Jennifer Varney, Lamar Soutter Library, University of Massachusetts Medical School–Worcester; Penny Glassman, New England Region, National Network of Libraries of Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School–Shrewsbury; and Elaine Russo Martin, Lamar Soutter Library, University of Massachusetts Medical School–Worcester.

TA17) Pathways to Online Information (ePOI): A Collaborative Project “One-stop-shopping” for E-resources: Virginia M. Tanji, Library Resource Center; Steven Seifried, Cell and Molecular Biology; and Annis Lee Adams, Library Resource Center; John A. Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawaii– Manoa, Honolulu, Hawaii; Carolyn Ching and Sarah Jansen, Hawaii Medical Library–Honolulu; and Paul Wermager and Jessica Hashimoto, Library, University of Hawaii–Manoa, Honolulu, Hawaii.

TA18) Improving Fill Rates at an Academic Medical Library: Ellen N. Sayed and Geneva Bush Staggs, University of South Alabama–Mobile.

TA19) Empowering Interlibrary Loan: Implementing ILLiad in DOCLINE/Loansome Doc Libraries: Joan M. Gregory, Camille M. Salmond, and Amy B. Birks, Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library, University of Utah–Salt Lake City.

TA20) The Power of Many: Development of a Collaborative Promotion System to Market and Evaluate Electronic Resources: Nicola J. Cecchino and Holly A. Harden, Welch Medical Library; and David Wright, Lilienfeld Library; Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland.

TA21) Bringing Order to Chaos: An Access Database for Ordering Pamphlets and Brochures for a Large Institution: Ruth Volk, Patient Education Resource Center, Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Michigan–Ann Arbor.

TA22) Selection and Implementation of Interlibrary Loan Management Software: Ellen N. Sayed, Evelyn Reed, and Earl Thompson, Biomedical Library, University of South Alabama–Mobile.

TA23) Power of Partnership: Librarians and Pediatric Nurse Educators Working Together to Improve the Delivery Process for Patient Education Materials: Misa Mi and Cathy Eames, Medical Library, Children's Hospital of Michigan–Detroit.

TA24) Consumer Health Resource Database Generated from the Consumer and Patient Health Information Section Email Discussion List: Stephanie Weldon, Denison Memorial Library, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center–Denver.

TA25) REACH 2010 Charleston and Georgetown Diabetes Coalition: Partners in Library-Diabetes Education Working to Eliminate Health Disparities: Barbara A. Carlson, Beverly Highland, Anna Johnson, Florene Linnen, Virginia Thomas, and Sharon Cash, REACH 2010 College of Nursing, Medical University of South Carolina–Charleston.

TA26) Urban Health Partners: New Outreach for Improving Health-related Services to Arab American Communities in Michigan: Deborah H. Charbonneau, Urban Health Partners, and Annette M. Healy, Vera P. Shiffman Medical Library, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan.

TA27) The Power of Partnerships: Bringing Medical Librarians to the Public Eye: Cheryl A. Capitani and Laurie J. Schwing, Library Services, PinnacleHealth System, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania.

TA28) Susquehanna Library Cooperative: Enhanced Resource Sharing 2004: Digital Power + Collaborative Power = Power of Improved Practice: Tricia Haas, James V. Brown Library, Williamsport, Pennsylvania; Michael Heyd, Learning Resources, Susquehanna Health System, Williamsport, Pennsylvania; and Claire A. Huntington and Susan M. Robishaw, Health Sciences Libraries, and Britain G. Roth, Academic Information, Geisinger Health System, Danville, Pennsylvania.

TA29) Camp for All Connection: Jeffrey T. Huber, School of Library and Information Studies, and Teresa J. Walsh, College of Nursing, Texas Woman's University–Houston; and Beatriz Varman, Houston Academy of Medicine-Texas Medical Center Library, Houston, Texas.

TA30) Communication Paradigms for Community Outreach, the Allendale Study: Dennis A. Pernotto, Health Sciences Library, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center–Shreveport.

TA31) Access to Electronic Health Information in North Central Pennsylvania: Valerie Gross, Community Health Resource Library, and Britain Roth, Health Sciences Library, Geisinger Health System, Danville, Pennsylvania.

TA32) If It's Tuesday, It Must be Belgium: The Power of an Urban Circuit Rider: Patricia May, Eleanor Silverman, and Madeleine Taylor, Health Sciences Library, St. Joseph's Regional Medical Center, Paterson, New Jersey; and Elaine Brogan, Medical Library & Parent Resource Center, Children's Specialized Hospital, Mountainside, New Jersey.

TA33) EmPowering the Community through Wireless Outreach: Graciela G. Reyna and Debra Warner, Medical Library, Regional Academic Health Center, University of Texas Health Science Center–San Antonio, Harlingen, Texas; Mary Jo Dwyer, Briscoe Library, and Cindy Olney, Academic Information Services, University of Texas Health Science Center– San Antonio; Andrew Lombardo, Medical Library, Regional Academic Health Center, University of Texas Health Science Center–San Antonio, Harlingen, Texas; Evelyn Olivier, Briscoe Library, University of Texas Health Science Center–San Antonio; and Santiago Villanueva, Colonias Program, Center for Housing and Urban Development, Texas A&M University–Weslaco.

TA34) MedlinePlus Go Local in Missouri: A Collaborative Venture Using Legacy Data: Amanda Lynn McConnell and Caryn Scoville, J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library, University of Missouri–Columbia.

TA35) Harnessing and Celebrating the Publishing Energy of Your Organization: Ellen Justice, Christiana Hospital Library, Christiana Care Health System, Newark, Delaware.

TA36) Empowering Faculty to Choose: Laura Abate, Leah Pellegrino, Anne Linton, and Patricia Wilson, Himmelfarb Health Sciences Library, The George Washington University, Washington, DC.

TA37) Faculty Publications Database: A Practical Approach to Identifying Collaborators: Janis F. Brown, Chris Ewing, Melissa L. Just, Joan Mircheff, David H. Morse, and Janet L. Nelson, Norris Medical Library, University of Southern California– Los Angeles.

TA38) Library Support for Scientific Writing and Publishing: Theresa S. Arndt and Anna Ercoli Schnitzer, Taubman Medical Library, University of Michigan–Ann Arbor.

TA39) Strategy to Promote Open Access Scholarly Communication at Tampere University Library, Department of Medicine, Finland: Saila M. Huuskonen, Department of Medicine, A. Anneli Ahtola, Main Library, and Leena I. Pesonen, Department of Medicine, Tampere University Library, Tampere, Finland.

TA40) Teaching Intellectual Property Law Concepts: Beyond Fair Use: Sara Anne Hook, Academic Policies, Procedures and Documentation, Indiana University-Purdue University and School of Informatics, Indiana University–Indianapolis.

TA41) Correcting the Literature after Scientific Misconduct: Problems and Potential in the Biomedical Electronic Journal and Database Environments: Ellen B. Marks, Shiffman Medical Library, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan.

TA42) Empowering Scholarly Communication through the Open Access Movement: A Historical Perspective: Hanna Kwasik and Pauline O. Fulda, Library, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center–New Orleans.

TA43) Power in Your People: Applying the Experiences of BioMed Central Authors to Change in Scholarly Publishing: Mary E. Youngkin and Jeanne Marie Le Ber, Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library; and Margaret M. Landesman, J. Willard Marriott Library; University of Utah–Salt Lake City.

TA44) The Power of New Publishing Possibilities: Promotion of Open Access Publishing: Jane L. Blumenthal and Marcus A. Banks, Dahlgren Memorial Library, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, DC.

TA45) The Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) Council of Academic Societies (CAS) Journal Study: Implications for Scholarly Communication in the Health Sciences: Gary D. Byrd, Health Sciences Library, University at Buffalo (SUNY), Buffalo, New York, and Shelley A. Bader, Himmelfarb Library, George Washington University Medical Center, Washington, DC.

Tuesday, May 25, 2004, 4:30 p.m. to 6:00 p.m

TP01) The Power of Community: Evaluating HLIB-NW, a Regional Discussion List: Maryanne P. Blake, National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Pacific Northwest Region, University of Washington–Seattle.

TP02) Strengthening Professionals: A Chapter-level Formative Evaluation of the MLA Mentoring Initiative: Pauline O. Fulda and Hanna Kwasik, Library, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center–New Orleans.

TP03) A Model for Recruiting and Educating from Within Libraries: Nunzia B. Giuse, Annette M. Williams, and Margaret Westlake, Eskind Biomedical Library, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee; Ellen G. Detlefsen, School of Information Sciences, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; and Taneya Y. Koonce, Eskind Biomedical Library, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee.

TP04) Improving Performance through an Internal Internship: Tracie Frederick, Dahlgren Memorial Library, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, DC.

TP05) Power of History, Power of Words: Diane McKenzie, Health Sciences Library, University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill, and Marlyse Hickman MacDonald, Duke University Medical Center Library, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina.

TP06) LibQUAL+: The Dynamo of Quality Assessment: Alexa Mayo, and Christian Miller, Health Sciences and Human Services Library, University of Maryland–Baltimore.

TP07) Withdrawn.

TP08) The Power of Current Awareness: Evaluation of an In-house Table of Contents Service at a Health Association: Cynthia R. Kahn and Marian Taliaferro, Reference Center and Archives, Association of American Medical Colleges, Washington, DC.

TP09) Can Your Library Improve Its Services? You Bet Your BIPS!: Karla J. Block, Bio-Medical Library, University of Minnesota–Minneapolis.

TP10) Connectivity and Computer Questions, Improving Practice through Question Analysis: Kurt Munson, Linda Walton, Linda O'Dwyer, Stephanie Kerns, and Mark Berendsen, Galter Health Sciences Library, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois.

TP11) Unleashing the Power of the Reengineered Matrix: Redefining Project Management: Nancy G. Burford and Heather Goetz, Medical Sciences Library, Texas A&M University–College Station.

TP12) Questions Asked at the Virtual and Physical Reference Desk: How Do They Compare and What Do They Tell Us?: Sandra L. De Groote, Information Services, University of Illinois– Chicago.

TP13) Seeing is Believing: Using Video to Assess Instruction Librarians: Marilyn H. Steinberg and Patricia McNary, Sheppard Library, Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences–Boston.

TP14) To Merge or Not to Merge: A Study on the Value of Maintaining Multiple Physical Service Points in Today's Changing Environment: Kristin Hitchcock, Sandra De Groote, Richard McGowan, and Deirdre Rawls, Library of the Health Sciences, University of Illinois–Chicago.

TP15) Withdrawn.

TP16) Duster Power: Eradicating Clutter in Preparation for a Three-Library Merger and Move: Sylvia Contreras, Micaela Sullivan-Fowler, and Jodi Iverson, Health Sciences Libraries, University of Wisconsin–Madison; and Marla Cilley, FlyLady.net, FlyLady and Company, Ellendale, Tennessee.

TP17) Trading Spaces: Planning for Offsite Storage at the University of California–San Diego: Susan Starr, Barbara Slater, and Anne Prussing, Biomedical Library, University of California–San Diego, La Jolla, California.

TP18) PR Power for a Library on the Move: Erika Sevetson, Michael Venner, Sylvia Contreras, and Natalie Norcross, Health Sciences Libraries, University of Wisconsin–Madison.

TP19) License to Fill: Seizing the Power and Providing Patrons with Materials from a Remote Storage Facility: Melanie J. Norton, Adam S. Vardaman, and Carol Jenkins, FMLA, Health Sciences Library, University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill.

TP20) The Combined Power of Metadata Standards and Controlled Vocabularies in the Health Education Assets Library (HEAL): Shona R. Dippie and Sharon E. Dennis, Spenser S. Eccles Health Sciences Library, University of Utah–Salt Lake City; Sebastian Uijtdehaage, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California–Los Angeles; Chris Candler, College of Medicine, University of Oklahoma–Oklahoma City; and Sandra A. McIntyre, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California–Los Angeles.

TP21) Librarians Empowering Health Science Educators: Collection Development in an International Multimedia Digital Library: Sharon Dennis, Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library, University of Utah–Salt Lake City; Sandra McIntyre, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California–Los Angeles; Shona Dippie, Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library, University of Utah–Salt Lake City; Joy Summers-Ables and Shari Clifton, Robert M. Bird Health Sciences Library, University of Oklahoma–Oklahoma City; Sebastian Uijtdehaage, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California–Los Angeles; and Chris Candler, School of Medicine, University of Oklahoma–Oklahoma City.

TP22) Neuro-Ophthalmology Virtual Education Library (NOVEL) Project: Nancy T. Lombardo and Valeri Craigle, Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library, University of Utah–Salt Lake City.

TP23) Building a Better Website through a Collaborative Web Development Process: Barrie E. Hayes, Barbara Lynn Eades, Michael J. London, Brian Hilligoss, Robert Ladd, and Lisa S. Rae, Health Sciences Library, University of North Carolina– Chapel Hill.

TP24) VIVO: The Powerful Web Portal of Cornell University's Life Sciences Initiative: Susanne K. Whitaker, Flower-Sprecher Veterinary Library, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, and helen-ann brown, Weill Cornell Medical Library, Cornell University, New York, New York.

TP25) Lighting the Path to a Powerful Web-based Tutorial: Richard Nollan, Brenda Faye Green, and Lin Wu, Health Sciences Library, University of Tennessee Health Science Center– Memphis.

TP26) Library Web Development: A Decade in Review: Mary E. Piorun and Robert Vander Hart, The Lamar Soutter Library, University of Massachusetts Medical School–Worcester.

TP27) If You Build It Will They Use It? Giving Patrons Control of Their Library Website Experience: Michelle Frisque, Steve Hunt, Linda Walton, and James Shedlock, Galter Health Sciences Library; and Jon Handler and Michael Gillam, Department of Medicine; Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois.

TP28) Amplifying Usability Testing: Harness the Power of Camtasia Studio: Linda O'Dwyer, Stephanie C. Kerns, Mark Berendsen, Kurt Munson, Cheryl Powell, and Linda Walton, Galter Health Sciences Library, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois.

TP29) Sharing the Code: The Health SmartLibrary Experience: Steven Hunt, Galter Health Sciences Library, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois.

TP30) Power Management: Seize the Crisis and Make It Work for You: Deborah Bonelli and Lisa Lin, Medical Library, St. Barnabas Hospital, Bronx, New York.

TP31) Seize the Power of Your Patrons to Promote Your Library: Amy G. Buhler, Dwight Bennett, and Ned Davis, Health Science Center Libraries, University of Florida–Gainesville.

TP32) Going for the Green$$$$: Martha M. Studaker, Phyllis L. Reams, and Sharon J. Williams, Hamady Health Sciences Library, Hurley Medical Center, Flint, Michigan.

TP33) The Arizona Health Sciences Library's “Ask a Health Librarian” Project: Marketing Our New Virtual Reference Chat Service: Bruce Chandler, Hannah Fisher, Fred Heidenreich, David K. Howse, Nga Nguyen, Joan Schlimgen, Stefan Walz, and Cathy Wolfson, Arizona Health Sciences Library, University of Arizona–Tucson.

TP34) Publicity Juggernaut at the University of Maryland Health Sciences and Human Services Library: Diane Fuller, Alexa Mayo, MJ Tooey, and Bradley Gerhart, Health Sciences and Human Services Library, University of Maryland–Baltimore.

TP35) Unearthing the Power of Data Mining to Evaluate and Manage Library Collections: Esther E. Carrigan, Nancy Burford, and Robin R. Sewell, Medical Sciences Library, Texas A&M University–College Station.

TP36) A Capital Improvement: The Remodeling of an Academic Medical Library's Reference Collection: Nancy A. Bianchi and Carroll Guitar, Dana Medical Library, University of Vermont–Burlington.

TP37) Withdrawn.

TP38) Core Journal Evaluation Study: Method and Data Analysis: Jane L. Blumenthal and Vani K. Murthy, Dahlgren Memorial Library, Georgetown University, Washington, DC.

TP39) Power through Communication: Using the Web in a Journal Evaluation Project: Robin Klein, Patricia G. Hinegardner, and Brad Gerhart, Health Sciences and Human Services Library, University of Maryland–Baltimore.

TP40) Linking Technology's Power to Deliver Needed Articles to Undergraduate Nursing Students: Marcia Henry, University Library, California State University–Northridge.

TP41) Tell the Story in a Powerful Way: Medical Library Collection Management: Carole Francq Gall, Ruth Lilly Medical Library, Indiana University School of Medicine–Indianapolis, and Jane F. Corbett, Training, Eli Lilly, Indianapolis, Indiana.

TP42) “But We Made the ‘Easy’ Cuts Last Year!” Staffing the Library: Jane Fama, The Lamar Soutter Library, University of Massachusetts Medical School–Worcester.

TP43) “But We Made the ‘Easy’ Cuts Last Year!” Maintaining a Quality Journal Collection in Tough Budget Times: Barbara Combes Ingrassia and Elaine Russo Martin, The Lamar Soutter Library, University of Massachusetts Medical School– Worcester.

OTHER MEETINGS AND EVENTS

Premeeting activities

The MLA Board of Directors held a business and planning meeting throughout the day on Friday, May 21. The MLA Credentialing Committee met during the evening of May 21.

On Saturday, May 22, the following committees met: the Books Panel; the Nominating Committee; and the 2004, 2005, and 2006 National Program Committees. In addition, the Chapter Council, chapter chairs, Section Council, section chairs, section council representatives, and section planners held meetings. The Hospital Libraries Section Executive Board held the first of its two sessions scheduled during MLA '04.

The Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries held a leadership lunch.

Sunday, May 23, 2004

Early Sunday morning, the Jospeh Leiter NLM/MLA Lectureship Committee and the Professional Recruitment and Retention Committee (Ad hoc) held their meetings. At the same time, the following sections also held business meetings: Corporate Information Services, Public Services, and Research. The Consumer and Patient Health Information Section Executive Committee meeting, the Hospital Libraries Section committee meetings, and the Veterinary Medical Libraries Board meeting were also scheduled at that time. At the end of the day, the following sections conducted business meetings: Consumer and Patient Health Information, History of the Health Sciences, Medical Informatics, Public Health/Health Administration, Relevant Issues, Technical Services, and Veterinary Medical Libraries. The Nursing and Allied Health Resources Section Board meeting was also scheduled at that time.

Monday, May 24, 2004

The following MLA units or committees met Monday morning: Awards, Governmental Relations, and Membership Committees; MLANET Editorial Board; section continuing education chairs; and section treasurers. MLA sections that also met in the morning included Chiropractic Libraries, Health Association Libraries, International Cooperation, Medical Library Education, and Pharmacy and Drug Information. The Fellows of MLA met in the mid-afternoon. At the end of the day, the following sections conducted business meetings: Cancer Librarians, Collection Development, Leadership and Management, and Nursing and Allied Health Resources. The Hospital Libraries Section also held a reception, and the Chiropractic Libraries Section scheduled an annual meeting of Chiropractic Library Consortium (CLIBCON). Informal meetings were scheduled at the same time by the following special interest groups (SIGs): the African American Medical Librarians Alliance; Complementary and Alternative Medicine; Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgendered Health Sciences Librarians; Mental Health; Molecular Biology and Genomics; Outreach; Problem-Based Learning; and Vision Science. Informal meetings held in the late afternoon included the following: MedlinePlus Go Local Information Session, Ovid Customer Forum, PubMed LinkOut User Meeting, QuickDoc User's Group Meeting, and the Family Practice Inquiries Network (FPIN) Librarian Community Meeting.

Tuesday, May 25, 2004

Early morning meetings were scheduled for the following committees and groups: Benchmarking Network Editorial Board, Bylaws Committee, chapter continuing education chairs, the Donald A. B. Lindberg Research Fellowship Jury, and Publications Committtee. MLA sections that also met in the morning included Dental, Educational Media and Technologies, and Federal Libraries. The Technical Services Section Executive Board and committee chairs also met at that time. An informal meeting on the advantage of Web-based library automation was held midday. RefWorks conducted a lunch and learn during the same time period. The Task Force to Develop MLA's Center of Research and Education (CORE) and the JMLA Editorial Board met in the late afternoon. Informal late afternoon meetings were scheduled by the Nursing and Allied Health Section's Task Force to Map the Literature of Nursing; the Hospital Libraries Section Executive Board held its second meeting; and the Public Services Section conducted its roundtables. The following SIGs also scheduled late afternoon informal meetings: Assessment and Benchmarking, Clinical Librarians and Evidence-Based Health Care, Department of the Army Medical Command Libraries, Department of Veterans Affairs Librarians, Marketing, Osteopathic Libraries, Pediatric Librarians, Primary Care, and Voyager Health Sciences. The Molecular Biology and Genomics SIG also held a reception. Other meetings held late in the day included the CyberTools for Libraries Users' Group, the National Institutes of Health–United States Department of Agriculture Dietary Supplements Reference Database, International Bibliographic Information on Dietary Supplements (IBIDS), a LibQual+ survey implementation session, and the Southern Chapter Executive Board.

Wednesday, May 26, 2004

The following MLA units held early morning meetings: Continuing Education, Grants and Scholarships, and Oral History Committees and the Task Force on Website Hosting for Sections and SIGs. An informal meeting was held at the same time by the Department of Veterans Affairs Librarians SIG. Other groups that met at the same time were the Electronic Fund Transfer System (EFTS) Users Group and librarians involved with their organizations' institutional animal care and use committees (IACUC). The Continuing Education Committee and Section Council both met again during the afternoon. Finally, a post Brandon/Hill lists discussion meeting was held at the end of the day.

Thursday, May 27, 2004

The MLA Continuing Education Committee met throughout the day.

OPEN FORUMS

Four concurrent forums were held on Monday, May 24, from 2:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.

Information Specialist in Context Concept

Diane G. Wolf, chair of MLA Task Force on the Information Specialist in Context, led this discussion. Other members of the task force were present, as well as representatives from the Eskind Biomedical Library who serve as consultants to MLA for the informationist concept. The charge to the task force was reviewed. The consultants from Eskind Biomedical Library described their approach to exploring roles, potential scenarios, and training paths for the informationist.

Information Technology Issues in Hospital Libraries

Ruth Holst, chair of NN/LM Hospital Internet Access Task Force, introduced all of the task force members and reviewed their charge. This was the first time all task force members were able to meet, having conducted their work so far by conference call. Terrie Wheeler, Janet Cowen, and Michelynn McKnight presented scenarios of how to surpass IT barriers in the hospital library setting. Discussion followed.

Institute of Museum and Library Sciences (IMLS) Grants

Joanne G. Marshall, FMLA, described two grant initiatives of the IMLS. Recipients of the Grants to Recruit and Educate Professionals for the 21st Century were present to describe their programs. Robert Martin, director of IMLS was also present. Annette M. Williams described the Vanderbilt-Pittsburgh project. Martha A. Bedard spoke of the Texas A&M and University of North Texas program. Christopher Shaffer noted the University of Iowa project has four partners: U of Iowa School of Library and Information Science, all University of Iowa science libraries, University of Nebraska– Lincoln libraries, and Iowa State University libraries. Finally, Dr. Marshall described the University of North Carolina program targeting PhD students. The informal presentations were followed by a question-and-answer session.

MLA Membership Dues

MLA Treasurer Neil Rambo led this open forum. Participants discussed the MLA Board–recommended dues increase before the vote the following day. (For details, see the business meeting sections of these proceedings.) The proposed increase is to be phased in over 2005 and 2006 and affects all dues paying membership categories

SUNRISE SEMINARS

Sunrise Seminars were available to meeting attendees. On Monday, May 25, the seminars were available from the following vendors or groups: EBSCO Information Services, MDConsult and FIRSTConsult, NLM Online User's Meeting, Thomson Scientific, and UpToDate. On Tuesday, May 25, seminars were presented by the American Psychological Association, BMJ Publishing Group, Cinahl Information Systems, DynaMed, EBSCO Information Services, EMBASE, Nature Publishing Group, Ovid, The Cochrane Library, and Thieme Electronic Book Library.

TECHNOLOGY SHOWCASES

Six Technology Showcases were scheduled this year at various times Sunday through Tuesday. They were:

Cinahl Information Systems, Sunday, May 23, 1:30 p.m. to 2:00 p.m.

wired.MD: The Future of Patient Education, Monday, May 24, 10:00 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.

EBSCO Databases for Biomedical Libraries, Monday, May 24, 3:00 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.

The CINAHL Database on EBSCOhost, Tuesday, May 25, 10:00 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.

EBSCO's Services for the Biomedical Library, Tuesday, May 25, 11:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.

Introducing CyberTools for Libraries, Tuesday, May 25, noon to 12:30 p.m.

POWER SURGES

Two Power Surges were scheduled on Monday, May 24, from 5:00 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. These events gave attendees the opportunity to meet in an informal setting with others who had similar interests.

“Integrating Informatics into the Curriculum” was coordinated by Robin Sewell and Gale Hannigan. They met with a small group to discuss a new edition of the MLA DocKit, Informatics in Health Sciences Curricula, written in 1999 by Janis F. Brown and Gale G. Hannigan. The participants provided ideas for revising the scope of the publication for the forthcoming second edition.

“The Future of Iraqi Libraries” was sponsored by the International Cooperation and Public Health/ Health Administration Sections. The four featured speakers who talked about their experiences were Mary-Jane Deeb from the Library of Congress, Alexander Garza from the University of Missouri–Kansas City School of Medicine, David G. Keddle from the Sunrise Hospital and Medical Center in Las Vegas, and Biddanda (Suresh) Ponnappa from the Quillen College of Medicine at East Tennessee State University–Johnson City.

NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE UPDATE

The traditional NLM Update was held on Tuesday, May 25, from 1:00 p.m. until 2:00 p.m. The presenters were Kent Smith, deputy director; Marjorie A. Cahn, head of the National Information Center on Health Services Research and Health Care Technology; and Betsy L. Humphreys, associate director for library operations. Kent Smith noted that Dr. Lindbergh has been director of NLM for twenty years. Highlights of the year at NLM included new resources, new initiatives and partners, and the juxtaposition of the retirement of the printed Index Medicus in the same year that the sixty-one printed volumes of the five series of the Index-Catalogue of the Library of the Surgeon-General's Office, 1880–1961 became available in digital format.

LEGISLATIVE UPDATE

The Governmental Relations Committee sponsored an update on Tuesday, May 25, from 2:30 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. on legislation in progress and related MLA activities. Invited speakers included Prue Adler, associate executive director, Federal Relations and Information Policy, Association of Research Libraries, Washington, DC; Dale Dirks, president, Health and Medicine Counsel of Washington, Washington, DC; and Jane Bortnick Griffith, assistant director for policy and legislative development, National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, Maryland. The speakers addressed several issues including:

  • fiscal year 2005 funding levels for the National Institutes of Health (NIH),
  • database legislation,
  • the Digital Media Consumers' Rights Act, legislation that seeks to restore balance in the copyright law between the rights of users and the rights of content owners,
  • information access,
  • civil liberties legislation that seeks to restore some of the balance to civil liberties and privacy that were changed through the USA PATRIOT Act of 2001, P.L. 107–56, and
  • civil liberties legislation that amends the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act of 1978 to improve the administration and oversight of foreign intelligence surveillance.

OTHER SPECIAL EVENTS AND RECEPTIONS

Saturday, May 22, 2004

Leaders Tea, 4:15 p.m. to 5:15 p.m.

Welcome reception and opening of Hall of Exhibits, Saturday evening. The exhibits were open through Tuesday afternoon, May 25.

Sunday, May 23, 2004

Majors Walk: The 16th Annual Walk for Fun, sponsored by J. A. Majors, from 6:30 a.m. to 8:00 a.m.

New Members and First-Time Attendees Breakfast, from 7:00 a.m. to 9:00 a.m.

Sharing roundtables presented by Chapter Council. The luncheon event provided opportunities for members to conduct information discussions on the following twenty-nine topics: AHIP membership; archives— traditional and electronic; benchmarking; bioterrorism; chairs and incoming chairs; consumer health; copyright issues with electronic journals and electronic books; distance education services; effective library reports; electronic document delivery; Electronic Fund Transfer System; evidence-based medicine; health literacy; informationists; library Websites; license negotiation; LinkOut (PubMed); marketing and public relations; mentoring; non-traditional reference services; one-person libraries; PDAs and health care; recruitment, retention, and staff development; rural health information outreach; service quality and outcomes assessment; strategic planning; survival strategies for hospital libraries; technology issues for hospital librarians; and virtual library services.

International Visitors Reception, from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.

Library School Reunion, from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.

Friends of the National Library of Medicine (FNLM) Reception, from 5:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.

Monday, May 24, 2004

Orientation for Capitol Hill visits, from 8:00 a.m. to 9:00 a.m. and Capitol Hill Visits, from 2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Tuesday, May 25, 2004

MLA Reception: Party with Powerful People, from 7:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m.

CONTINUING EDUCATION COURSES AND SYMPOSIA

The 2003/04 Continuing Education Committee offered the following courses on May 21, 22, and 26.

CE 100, Licensing Electronic Resources

CE 141, Joint Commission Standards: Management of Information and Beyond

CE 152, Managing Electronic Resources: Beyond the Basics

CE 193, Communicating with Physicians: For Librarians

CE 210, Planning and Managing Consumer Health Libraries

CE 231, Planning Library Promotion Campaigns

CE 252, Marketing as if Your Library Depended on It

CE 263, Writing and Editing for Peer-Reviewed Library Journals

CE 274, Face to Face: Strategies for Effective Consumer Health Communication

CE 275, Library Directors: Knowledge, Skills, and Career Paths

CE 330, Molecular Biology and Genetics for Librarians

CE 351, How to Find Good, Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) Information on the Web: For Health Care Consumers and Professionals

CE 373, Genomics, Proteomics, and Bioinformatics for Librarians

CE 384, Finding Measurement Tools: A Basic Introduction

CE 385, Data Detective: Finding the Jewels of Public Health Datasets

CE 386, Immunology for Librarians

CE 397, Integrating Molecular Biology Databases into the Health Care Informatics Environment

CE 399, Nursing on the 'Net: Health Care Resources You Can Use

CE 400, Evidence-based Information Service Delivery: Oh, Librarian, Where Art Thou?

CE 421, Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) Basics

CE 452, Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) for Searchers

CE 500, Technology Planning for Health Sciences Librarians

CE 511, Advanced Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs) for Librarians

CE 542, Launching a Public Digital Archive: Software, Policies, Management, and Marketing

CE 553, High-Impact Design for the Web and PowerPoint: A Hands-on Workshop

CE 600, Developing Your Own Web-based Course: How to Make It Happen

CE 601, Evidence-based Public Health: Finding and Appraising Relevant Resources

CE 652, Evidence-based Medicine and the Medical Librarian

CE 653, Teaching Information Literacy

CE 750, Focus Group Interviewing: A Qualitative Research Methodology for the Library

CE 751, Measuring the Difference: Strategies for Planning and Evaluating Health Information Outreach Programs

Two meeting symposia were also offered.

CE 841, Symposium: Medical School Experience: Sponsored by the New York-New Jersey Chapter of MLA and held on Saturday, May 22, from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

CE 842, Symposium: Seize the E-journal: Models for Archiving: Sponsored by MLA's Collection Development Section and held on Wednesday, May 26, from 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m

The premeeting courses, three postmeeting courses, and the two symposia had a total registration of 811.

RESOURCES AND SERVICES

A Hospitality Center was open for approximately fifty-six hours starting Thursday, May 20. Area experts were on hand to provide maps, directions, and advice. The Placement Service was open for forty-three hours starting Friday, May 21. The Member Resource Room offered computers, printers, copiers, and typewriters Friday through Wednesday. An Internet Cafe was available outside the Hall of Exhibits Friday through Wednesday as well, and messaging and lost-and-found services were offered. The Capitol Current provided highlights of daily activities, changes in meetings, events, and information about attractions in the Washington, DC area; three issues were published, Sunday, May 23, to Tuesday, May 25.

APPENDIX

Acronyms used in proceedings

A more complete list of acronyms used in MLA publications can be found in the MLA Style Manual on MLANET at http://www.mlanet.org/publications/style/stylacron.html.

  • A
  • AAHSL  Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries
  • AALL  American Association of Law Librarians
  • ACMI  American College of Medical Informatics
  • AHILA  Association for Health Information and Libraries in Africa
  • AHIP  Academy of Health Information Professionals (indicates membership)
  • ALA  American Library Association
  • AMIA  American Medical Informatics Association
  • ARL  Association of Research Libraries
  • B
  • BIREME  Biblioteca Regional de Medicine
  • BMLA  Bulletin of the Medical Library Association
  • C
  • CE  continuing education
  • CHLA/ABSC  Canadian Health Libraries Association/Association des Bibliothèques de la santé du Canada
  • CLIBCON  Chiropractic Library Consortium
  • CORE  Center of Research and Education
  • D
  • DC Prin >ciples  Washington DC Principles for Free Access to Science
  • E
  • EAHIL  European Association for Health Information Libraries
  • EBM  evidence-based medicine
  • EFTS  Electronic Fund Transfer System
  • F
  • FMLA  Fellow of the Medical Library Association
  • FNLM  Friends of the National Library of Medicine
  • FPIN  Family Practice Inquiries Network
  • H
  • HLS  Hospital Libraries Section
  • HOSA  Health Occupation Students of America
  • I
  • IACUC  institutional animal care and use committee
  • IAIMS  Integrated Advanced Information Management Systems
  • IBIDS  International Bibliographic Information on Dietary Supplements
  • ICML9  Ninth International Congress on Medical Librarianship
  • ICS  International Cooperation Section
  • IFLA  International Federation of Library Associations
  • IMIA  International Medical Informatics Association
  • IMLS  Institute of Museum and Library Sciences
  • ISIC  Information Specialist in Context
  • J
  • JMLA  Journal of the Medical Library Association
  • L
  • LAC  Local Assistance Committee
  • LCME  Liaison Committee on Medical Education
  • LEEP  Library Education Experimental Program, distance education program at the University of Illinois–Urbana-Champaign's Graduate School of Library and Information Science
  • M
  • MIS  Medical Informatics Section
  • MLA  Medical Library Association
  • N
  • NIH  National Institutes of Health
  • NLM  National Library of Medicine
  • NPC  National Program Committee
  • P
  • PAHO  Pan American Health Organization
  • PI  principal investigator
  • S
  • SIG  special interest group
  • SLA  Special Library Association
  • SPARC  Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition
  • U
  • UMLS  Unified Medical Language System
  • W
  • WHO  World Health Organization

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