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Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. Jun 6, 1995; 92(12): 5605–5609.
PMCID: PMC41745

Accelerated evolution in the protein-coding regions is universal in crotalinae snake venom gland phospholipase A2 isozyme genes.

Abstract

The nucleotide sequences of four genes encoding Trimeresurus gramineus (green habu snake, crotalinae) venom gland phospholipase A2 (PLA2; phosphatidylcholine 2-acylhydrolase, EC 3.1.1.4) isozymes were compared internally and externally with those of six genes encoding Trimeresurus flavoviridis (habu snake, crotalinae) venom gland PLA2 isozymes. The numbers of nucleotide substitutions per site (KN) for the noncoding regions including introns were one-third to one-eighth of the numbers of nucleotide substitutions per synonymous site (KS) for the protein-coding regions of exons, indicating that the noncoding regions are much more conserved than the protein-coding regions. The KN values for the introns were found to be nearly equivalent to those of introns of T. gramineus and T. flavoviridis TATA box-binding protein genes, which are assumed to be a general (nonvenomous) gene. Thus, it is evident that the introns of venom gland PLA2 isozyme genes have evolved at a similar rate to those of nonvenomous genes. The numbers of nucleotide substitutions per nonsynonymous site (KA) were close to or larger than the KS values for the protein-coding regions in venom gland PLA2 isozyme genes. All of the data combined reveal that Darwinian-type accelerated evolution has universally occurred only in the protein-coding regions of crotalinae snake venom PLA2 isozyme genes.

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Selected References

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