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J Med Libr Assoc. Jan 2004; 92(1): 117–124.
PMCID: PMC314120

Proceedings, 103rd Annual Meeting Medical Library Association, Inc. San Diego, California May 2–7, 2003

Pauline O. Fulda, M.S., AHIP, Editor1 and Rebecca K. Satterthwaite, M.S., Assistant Editor2

CONTENTS

  • Introduction  117
  • Welcome to MLA '03  117
  • Presidential Address: Linda Watson  118
  • Plenary Sessions  124
  • Business Meeting and Awards Ceremony  125
  • Presidential Inaugural Address: Patricia L. Thibodeau and MLA '04 Invitation  134
  • Section Programming I–IV  138
  • Poster Presentations  144
  • Other Meetings and Events  151
  • Open Forums  152
  • Sunrise Seminars  152
  • California Chats  152
  • Xtreme Rides  152
  • National Library of Medicine Update  152
  • Legislative Update  152
  • Other Special Events and Receptions  153
  • Continuing Education Courses  153
  • Resources and Services  154
  • Acknowledgments  154

The Medical Library Association, Inc. (MLA), held its 103rd Annual Meeting in San Diego, California, May 2–7, 2003, at the Town and Country Resort & Convention Center. The meeting theme was MLA '03 “Catch the Wave.” The daily newsletter, The Swell, provided highlights of daily activities, changes in meetings, events, and information about attractions in the San Diego area; four issues were published, Saturday, May 3–Tuesday, May 6. Total MLA meeting attendance was 2,412.

Additional meeting content, including the meeting program and electronic presentations from business, plenary, poster, and section presentations can be found on MLANET at http://www.mlanet.org/am/am2003/. Candid photos can be found at the site as well.

WELCOME TO MLA '03

Sunday, May 4, 2003

The opening session was convened by MLA President Linda A. Watson, who welcomed members to the meeting. She thanked the 2003 National Program Committee for delivering an “extreme” program that would offer something for every attendee. President Watson then introduced Craig C. Haynes, president of the Medical Library Group of Southern California and Arizona. First, Mr. Haynes began by providing a unique San Diego welcome with his version of the song “Good Morning.” He then delivered his welcome.

Craig C. Haynes: On behalf of the Medical Library Group of Southern California and Arizona, it is my honor and pleasure to welcome you all to San Diego to this 103rd Annual Meeting of MLA. Although I suppose I really should say, not just welcome, but welcome back! Some of you may know that MLA convened in San Diego way back in 1972 at the Hotel Del. But don't worry, I am not going to ask for a show of hands of how many of you were here at that meeting way back then, but what I will ask is: MLA, what took you so long? Was it something we said? Was it something we did? No matter, all is forgiven, and we are delighted that you are here now.

I wish to offer my deepest thanks to the scores of volunteers who have worked and are working to make this MLA meeting the best ever! Thanks, also, to MLA headquarters staff, who always do an outstanding job, and thanks to each of you for being here. Without guests, there is no party.

So, have a great meeting, enjoy your stay in San Diego, and one last thing: MLA, don't stay away so long. Thanks.

President Watson then introduced two special guests, Robert Willard, executive director of the United States National Commission on Libraries and Information Science, and Ian Snowley, director of Information Services, Royal Society of Medicine, London, England, United Kingdom. She then recognized new MLA members and first-time attendees.

The president then asked the cochairs of the 2003 National Program Committee, Ysabel Bertolucci and Gail A. Yokote, and the cochairs of the 2003 Local Arrangements Committee, Marilyn Wolf Schwartz and Mary Linn Bergstrom, to give opening comments. Ms. Yokote and Ms. Bertolucci's presentation consisted of a narrated slide show.

Gail Yokote: Cowabunga! The 2003 National Program Committee (NPC) is pleased to present an epic (excellent) annual meeting, with plenty of lines (sets of incoming waves that look perfect to ride) and plenty of onion (enough waves for everyone). The NPC and Local Assistance Committee (LAC) members are hangin' (genuine state of contentment) and stoked (happy, elated). We expect you to be ripping (executing dramatic and radical moves on the waves) and locked in (occupying the optimum position on the wave to maximize the ride).

Some of you will be lit-up (catching a “just right” wave for the perfect ride), while others will be radical (exhibiting positive energy) and stylie (performing quality maneuvers in good form).

This year's annual meeting features record numbers of contributed papers and posters; Xtreme Rides (late-breaking presentations); California Chats (informal idea swapping and networking); PDA beaming kiosks; a Technology Pavilion, showcasing vendor products; and a jointly sponsored Chapter/Section Councils program in a casual and fun environment.

Ysabel Bertolucci: It takes a cadre of people to plan an annual meeting, and we would like to introduce you to them. First is our leader, MLA President Linda Watson. It takes the support of the MLA Board and headquarters staff; the way cool staff of Hall Erickson meeting planners, who made our wacky ideas come to life; and the entire NPC. Now, let me introduce them individually: The “Nays,” Linné Girouard and Renée Bougard, who worked on the new venues of Xtreme Rides and California Chats; the technology advisors, those way cool California girls, Julia K. Kochi and Melissa L. Just; the liaisons, Janet G. Schnall, the Section Council liaison, and Kay E. Wellik, the continuing education liaison; Janet Schnall was also the person in charge of the paper submission process, and Karen J. Graves worked with her; Penny Worley, jack-of-all-trades, who worked on a series of committees; and Judy Burnham, poster girl. I was amazed at her knowledge of surfer lingo. I now believe that Mobile, Alabama, is the surf capital of the south. We continue with Cheryl Suttles, who had the best aloha shirt on the NPC; Clinton Marty Thompson, the only person who knew how to use the air machine to blow up the beach balls. We did love those beach balls, and Claire Hamasu, who was in charge of Xtreme Rides. Here, bringing in those beach balls for the invitation to San Diego, is the entire group: the NPC, LAC, and local chapter members who helped us invite you to San Diego and last but not least, our LAC cochairs, Marilyn Wolf Schwartz and Mary Linn Bergstron.

Gail Yokote: As NPC cochairs, we hope the meeting conditions are cranking (perfect surfing conditions) and that you display your looseness (ability to make a surfboard do many different things) and find your X factor (intangible ingredient to quality surfing). Now, please welcome Marilyn Schwartz and Mary Linn Bergstorm, the LAC cochairs.

Ms. Schwartz and Ms. Bergstrom continued the welcoming remarks with a narrated slide show. Included was a collection of candid photos of NPC members and others as they carried out their responsibilities during the previous year. Examples of some of the pictures included one of the booth at MLA '02 in Dallas, others at the Town and Country Resort & Convention Center meeting location, and additional ones of the San Diego area and the Navy's Mercy Hospital Ship. Members of the LAC were then introduced: Deborah G. Batey, Publicity, Veterans Administration Medical Center, San Diego; Mary E. Aldous, Hospitality Booth, Naval Health Research Center; Penny T. Ward, Library Tours, Scripps Mercy Hospital; Michaele M. Robinson, Library Tours, Scripps Mercy Hospital; Penny Coppernoll-Blach, newsletter editor, University of California–San Diego Biomedical Library; Anna M. Habetler, Hospitalty Booth, Children's Hospital; Jennifer Reiswig, Website coordinator, University of California–San Diego Biomedical Library; and Marilyn Hall, Website coordinator, San Diego State University. Attendees were encouraged to enjoy the meeting and the city and to stop at the Hospitality Booth for area information. Finally, they thanked the following: MLA headquarters staff for their constant support with weekly emails and calls on handling details; the vendors and sponsors for their consistent support of MLA meetings over the years; the staff of the Town and Country Resort & Convention Center; and the “forefathers” and “foremothers” of the Dallas LAC for their advice and help.

Gail Yokote then formally introduced MLA President Linda Watson. President Watson thanked the many sponsors who gave financial contributions totaling $84,750 to support the annual meeting. She then gave her presidential address, titled: “Peak Performance: Librarians on the Crest of a Wave.”

PRESIDENTIAL ADDRESS

Linda Watson: Thank you, Gail. It has been a real pleasure working with Gail, Ysabel, headquarters staff, and the entire NPC team this past year to plan this meeting. And after the opening reception last evening, by now I am sure you have realized that, while we take our business seriously, we are not adverse to having a lot of fun in the process!

The “Catch the Wave” theme for our meeting really captured my imagination this year. The following words in a travel article about Hawaii seemed written just for me.

The waves had a pulse, driven by an invisible heart. Many times I missed that rhythm, and watched a wave lift me up and pass me by without hooking my board into its curve. Other times I hesitated, and the water smashed over me. But a couple of times I hit the timing just right, and finally understood what it means to catch a wave. There was an undeniable magic to it. [1]

My year as president has been a bit like that. Our association has its own rhythm. Each president needs to feel that rhythm and learn how to harmonize his or her ideas and personal style with that rhythm so that the magic can happen. Each president hopes that his or her contribution can make a positive difference to the association, to you the members, and to society. Serving as president of the Medical Library Association has been an honor, and a highlight of my career, and I thank you all for that privilege.

For my year as president, I chose the theme “Health Information Champions” as a way to frame our strategic thinking and direct our actions. My passion for sports led me to think in terms of champions, and I explored that idea in my inaugural address titled “Extreme Librarians: Champions for Quality Health Information.” I used the skill and dedication of the athletes of the winter Olympics as an illustration of extreme effort in achieving a goal.

And I snuck in comments about my beloved Medliners softball team. I compared that athletic skill and dedication to the extreme librarians in our midst, who have, likewise, contributed enormously to our profession and its goals.

I would like to extend that further today by reflecting on peak performance—what that means to us as individuals and what it has meant for our association this past year. I am going to mix some metaphors here by envisioning land and sea, mountains and waves. We'll see if it works!

In March, I attended a morning-long seminar sponsored by the University of Virginia's Executive Leadership Network to which I belong. We had invited the university's nine vice presidents to join us for a conversation about their goals and aspirations for the university, the challenges they face, and the leadership perspectives they each bring to the enterprise. We had asked them to address the following question: Can you think of a time recently when your commitment and connection to the university were at their highest—when you were at your peak performance? What was happening? What made it peak performance?

Their responses were remarkably candid. One vice president answered that when the president assigned him a responsibility, well beyond his current zone of comfort and expertise, he was amazed that he was able to succeed and make a positive difference in the outcome of a thorny organizational issue.

I am sure all of you can identify a similar situation in which you faced a major challenge and through your experience, your skills, and your efforts, a significant result was achieved, despite self-doubts you might have had. I have had such moments professionally. It felt pretty good, didn't it? Exhilarating even. When I think about the respected leaders at my university, and when I think about the leaders in our association, I realize that they have based their lives on contribution, rather than focused on power, prestige, security, and money—although those things may have accrued. Our peak performances usually revolve around facing a challenge and making a significant contribution to the task at hand.

I have also had peak performances athletically. I began running two years ago. One of my goals was to run in the 5K sponsored by the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA) at last August's IFLA meeting in Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom. I joined seventy-five other runners on a drizzly morning and managed to finish in not-quite-last place. Carla J. Funk and my husband William (Bill) Cooper (the photographer) greeted me at the finish.

And just last month, I ran my first ten mile race—something I have been training for two years, albeit sporadically. The Charlottesville Ten Miler is the largest and most anticipated race in central Virginia. Nearly 2,000 runners from thirty states pounded their way through the hilly streets of Charlottesville and the grounds of the university, I among them. Now in sports, confidence and positive imaging are critical factors in success, envisioning a positive outcome when time to perform makes a significant difference in the outcome. But I had many doubts, mainly because I had never run the distance before (a real no-no). Eight miles had been my personal best. And while my goal was just to finish the race, I really did not want to bring up the rear, even though the stragglers at the end of a race often get more cheers than those who cross the finish line first! Nonetheless, I decided to set aside my nerves and self-doubt, to set a goal of twelve-minute miles, and to just set out to succeed.

The results? I am happy and proud to report that I achieved my goal of finishing the race, in under two hours. It was really hard those last miles, but I was encouraged by spectators along the route, and even the university's pep band! I kept thinking of this talk, actually, and how it would have blown my theme if I had dropped out! I crossed the finish line in one hour and fifty-six minutes and had enough energy to smile as my husband Bill snapped a photo!

My ten-mile race reflects individual athletic peak performance—no one else but I was responsible for the outcome. But the experience was shared with colleagues, both on the course and on the sidelines. I had received training advice and encouragement from many.

It seems to me that this is similar to the way we, MLA members, come together within our association. We have our individual roles at our institutions, but we come together as colleagues both here at an annual meeting and virtually year round—a community of practice, of shared experience, of encouragement and celebration. Collectively, I believe we have experienced peak performance this past year as an association, librarians on the crest of a wave.

Last year, I asked, “Can we envision the future with enough passion and conviction and confidence that we can make it happen?” I asked you to consider MLA as the “Extreme Team” starring in our own year-round Olympics.

Perhaps it was a carryover from the extreme librarian concept I proposed, or enthusiasm generated by the theme of “Catch the Wave” in preparation for this meeting, or perhaps everyone's rhythms were just totally in sync, but I have felt an incredible amount of energy in the association this year. We had a record number of members volunteering for placement on a committee; our task forces, committees, sections, and chapters were incredibly productive; we had a record number of poster and paper submissions; and the registration for this meeting has exceeded our expectations. Tomorrow you will be able to celebrate the individual accomplishments of your colleagues at the awards presentation beginning at 10:30 a.m. followed by a poolside lunch. Please be sure to attend.

What accounts for our successes this year? Well, the president can establish annual priorities and help shape a vision and a direction for the association, but the real value is found in the members who contribute their time and energy to realize a shared vision. My report reflects enormous vitality within our association—a coupling of the talents of members and of headquarters staff. To all MLA members and staff, I am grateful for your support this past year.

Let me start with headquarters staff. I did some quick calculations, and do you realize how many years of collective experience we have working on our behalf? Would you believe 136 years of knowledge about us, our issues, and our values? A group of nineteen dedicated individuals who are colleagues and friends. Like Carla Funk, with 11.5 years, Ray Naegele, 21 years, Kate Corcoran, 15.5 years, Mary Langman, 14 years, and all the others.

Following the Thursday meeting of the MLA Board of Directors, I presented to Carla and headquarters staff a copy of the book, Chicago Then and Now, as a small token of our appreciation for all they have done. Would the headquarters staff who are here please stand so that we can recognize you?

And what about members? MLA proudly considers itself a “volunteer organization,” counting on the wisdom and energies of members for setting direction for the association and for carrying out much of the work.

Here is our 2002/03 MLA Leaders Directory. Do you realize there are 1,000 names in this directory? One thousand leaders comprised of officers, directors, appointed officials and editors, members of committees, juries, task forces, representatives to allied organizations, section officers, chapter officers, SIG conveners. One thousand extreme librarians not even counting section and chapter members.

What if we estimate that on average, each of these 1,000 leaders spent, very conservatively, ten hours each this past year on their responsibilities. That translates to 10,000 hours or 5.2 years of effort. If you plug in an hourly rate of $25 per hour, you end up with $250,000 of value to the association and the work we do—about one-tenth of MLA's entire budget. Ten hours per year contribution is on the low side, I am sure. So this number could easily double.

So, let us celebrate our accomplishments together.

A key personal priority was to establish more frequent communication with members. To this end, I initiated a monthly update on MLANET entitled “Seeking Our Edge: Update from the President.” With the support of headquarters staff, I posted reports and photos of my travels to chapter meetings and described selected other activities. I enjoyed this mini-Weblog approach. I hope you did as well.

Much time was spent on the association's strategic plan, an initiative that began several years ago. From May through October 2002, the MLA Board worked hard to develop a draft plan titled “MLA's Future: Issues, Challenges, Choices.” We then solicited member input in a variety of ways, including hosting a lively MLANET Web forum and conducting sessions at many of the fall 2002 and spring 2003 chapter meetings. A second draft was issued in December 2002 incorporating many member ideas. A final draft was completed last month and will guide our thinking into the future.

While the words may have changed a bit over time, our vision has remained steadfast:

MLA believes that quality information is essential for improved health. To that end, MLA aspires to be the association of the most visible, valued, and trusted health information experts; fostering excellence in the professional achievement and leadership of health sciences library and information professionals to enhance the quality of health care, education, and research throughout the world.

Our core values represent the heart and soul of our association, expressed as commitment to both the profession and society. They range from improving the knowledge and skills of health information professionals and advocating new roles for the profession, to advancing our valuable role in providing the best information to all who work in health care, health education, and biomedical research and to the public.

We have set five broad goals to set our direction for the future.

  1. recruitment, membership, and leadership in the profession
  2. lifelong learning
  3. advocacy
  4. creating and communicating our knowledge
  5. building a network of partners

My priorities as president included harnessing our collective strength in numbers, our collective intelligence, and our collective voice. Let's take a look at each in the context of the goals of our new strategic plan, and in what we have accomplished this year.

My priority one was to cultivate an expanded and energized workforce. This maps to goal one and goal three in our new plan. Goal one is recruitment, membership, and leadership in the profession; goal three is advocacy.

In support of goal one, the Task Force to Recruit the Twenty-First Century Workforce, chaired so ably by Elizabeth Irish, developed an ambitious action plan for recruiting new people to the profession. The task force is set to conclude its work in September, but this issue is so important that the MLA Board at its January meeting established an ad hoc Professional Recruitment and Retention Committee to maintain the task force's momentum. Members of this new committee will be appointed soon.

Regarding recruitment efforts, did you see the February 1 issue of Library Journal? There is an article on recruitment and retention that has the following quote about MLA:

The Medical Library Association's MLANET also outdoes [the American Library Association] ALA. This invigorating site offers medical librarianship brochures in both English and Spanish. There are also tip sheets, both for new librarians and for those entering the field as second careers. There are links for career exploration and resources and online career fairs, as well as a list of U.S. and Canadian library schools divided by state and province. [2]

Bravo to headquarters staff and to the task force.

And did you see the February 24 U.S. News & World Report article on careers where librarians are considered a “hot ticket” [3]? And how about this image from a clever calendar designed by librarians in New Jersey?

Last year we were excited by the announcement of First Lady Laura Bush's initiative on the recruitment of librarians centered in the Institute for Museum and Library Services (IMLS). Congress finally approved the IMLS budget, and the first grant proposals were due on April 15. MLA is supporting a proposal by the University of North Carolina's School of Information and Library Sciences focusing on doctoral level students with the potential for health sciences–related research. We also submitted a letter of support for a proposal by Texas A&M Medical Sciences Library and the University of North Texas School of Library and Information Sciences that focuses on recruiting undergraduates in health studies to a master's program. The board will also consider its own proposal for the next round of funding by the February 2004 deadline.

My priority to cultivate an expanded and energized workforce also relates to advocacy on behalf of members (part of our goal three). One of the strategies is to explore new and expanded roles for librarians. In April 2002, MLA hosted the Informationist Conference at the National Library of Medicine in Bethesda, Maryland. Supported by a grant from National Library of Medicine (NLM), the invitational conference was organized to facilitate a national discussion, arrive at a consensus definition, and develop recommendations for an action agenda for informationist professionals in clinical and research domains. A real-time discussion about the informationist concept was held with conference speakers on May 9, and two chapter roundtables and an open forum on the topic were held at the MLA '02 Dallas meeting. So, have we achieved a consensus definition yet?

Well, do you remember another “I” word introduced way back in the 1980s? It was IAIMS—an NLM program to promote and fund integrated advanced information management systems. Well, there was much discussion and confusion about what that “I” word meant, too,—and it actually never had a single definition, but rather many interpretations to fit each unique institutional environment. Likewise, this new “I” word. I envision there will be many variations on a theme—that theme being enhanced roles for medical librarians in their environments, whether that environment be patient care, research, education, public health, consumer health, or something else.

The Informationist Conference Task Force, chaired by Jean P. Shipman, submitted an action agenda to the board in September, which was subsequently posted on MLANET. At the January board meeting, we discussed the importance of this initiative to the association and the profession, and so established the Task Force on Information Specialists in Context to coordinate implementation of the action agenda. The task force will be chaired by Diane G. Wolf, a clinical medical librarian. The action agenda will involve many partners and stakeholders both within and outside MLA. Did you see the article in the April 1 issue of Library Journal by Jean P. Shipman and J. Michael Homan titled “Medicine's Library Lifeline?” A sidebar states “Librarians in the new role of informationist can help doctors and researchers to stay ahead of the curve and may help save lives along the way” [4].

Another strategy to advocate on behalf of our members is to demonstrate and promote our value. I hope you all saw the excellent article by J. Michael Homan in the September 16 issue of HealthLeaders News titled “The Role of Medical Librarians in Reducing Medical Errors” [5]. Michael wrote it when he was president of MLA more than two years ago. Our public relations consultant, PCI, had to work very hard to get that article placed in a journal that health administrators would be likely to read. We hope you can use it in your own institutions to help make your own expertise more visible.

We are also developing additional tools you can use to promote yourselves in your institutions. Two years ago, we commissioned a “Value of Information” study with the University of Maryland. The results of that study are now on MLANET and published in the Journal of the Medical Library Association (JMLA). We have begun extracting information from that study as a core part of a revised Advocacy Toolbox, providing you with ideas to take to your administration. The toolbox is debuting here at this meeting.

We are also concerned about the salary issue. Carla J. Funk and President-Elect Patricia Thibodeau attended the session at ALA last year entitled “ALA's Campaign for America's Librarians.” The extensive advocacy document developed by ALA is available through a link on MLANET. We are extracting information from that document combined with our own recent salary summary data to provide templates that members can use locally. We will be hosting an open forum this afternoon at 2:30 p.m. on this important topic.

We are attempting to forge even broader relationships to promote our value such as with Research!America, a national advocacy group of which MLA is a member. I provided an interview for their January 2003 member newsletter, which reaches a diverse audience of researchers, government officials, professional associations who support research, and the general public.

Two additional tools are in our advocacy arsenal. Last year, 385 members input data to our new Benchmarking Network. A special thank you is due to the benchmarking chapter educators for their extraordinary efforts on behalf of this initiative. Take a look at the MLANET Member's Only Website for a comprehensive portfolio of benchmarking reports, which includes massive amounts of data translated into user-friendly formats, including developing scenarios as to how the data could be used. We hope you can begin to use this information to make cases for your own library. But measuring and benchmarking is never ending! The benchmarking input site will be open for round two soon, and we are hoping to get even more hospital libraries to participate. Stay tuned for more word from the Benchmarking Task Force.

I also want to recognize the work of the Hospital Libraries Section team who worked so hard over the past several years to revise the “Standards for Hospital Libraries,” which were completed last summer. This work was coordinated by Jeannine Cyr Gluck of Eastern Connecticut Health Network. Jeannine has also made a heroic effort as MLA's representative to the Joint Commission on the Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO), along with MLA Executive Director Carla J. Funk. Jeannine participated in the JCAHO Information Management Working Group meeting in Chicago in February to revise the Information Management standards. Jeannine has worked tirelessly to represent hospital librarians, and we owe her much thanks for this difficult task.

All of us have been concerned for some time with the issues surrounding access to the published literature. The rising cost of journals and increasingly complex and restrictive licensing agreements are hampering our ability to provide information to our users. MLA has held symposia, continuing education courses, and distance education programs on the topic. And we have recently developed a new Website with resources and links to information about the various issues.

MLA, and especially Carla, have been active in monitoring the unfortunate situation with divine/Faxon/RoweCom. Carla has personally communicated with nearly 100 MLA members about their exposure. Headquarters established a site on MLANET that provides information for members. The site was recognized in the April 2003 issue of American Libraries as

One of the most comprehensive and useful sites addressing the issue … It's an extremely well-organized site, with sections on how to keep informed, and several useful discussion lists for both information and action. [6]

We also want to hear from you about the specific impact the issues in scholarly publication are having on your libraries and your users. We gathered input from members on a Web discussion on MLANET during April. We are holding an Open Forum on Scholarly Publishing this afternoon at 2:30 p.m. Please join us if you can. The questions we will be exploring are: (1) What frustrates you most in dealing with issues of scholarly publication? (2) What is the most important thing that MLA could do to make a difference? and (3) What do you think is the most promising longterm solution to the current “crisis” in scholarly communication? What do you see as MLA's role?

My second priority was to foster a learning and evidence-based culture, corresponding to our strategic plan goals two, lifelong learning, and four, creating and communicating our knowledge. The Continuing Education (CE) Committee has been hard at work on your behalf. This past year, MLA has sponsored several excellent satellite teleconferences including “Sync or Swim: Managing the Flood of PDAs in Health Care,” “Safeguarding Our Patrons' Privacy: What Every Librarian Needs to Know about the USA PATRIOT Act,” and “Get Hip to HIPAA: Health Information Professionals and the Health Information Portability and Accountability Act.” Plans are underway for one on consumer health in the fall.

In addition to creating a successful Consumer Health Information Specialization that was introduced last year, the CE Committee plans to debut a Digital Library Specialization program this fall. The CE Committee has also been working to increase the number of Web-based continuing education opportunities for MLA members. And in the interest of providing low-cost continuing education opportunities to all MLA members, the CE Committee is developing an independent reading program that would allow MLA continuing education credit for reading and summarizing articles from professional literature. The CE Committee worked with the Southern Chapter to pilot this program, and it should be launched by the summer.

Building on the success of MLA professional development and research programs is one of the charges for a new MLA task force, the Task Force to Develop MLA's Center of Research and Education, or CORE as we call it. Our vision is that MLA is the best source for high-quality health information education, meeting the needs of learners anywhere, anytime, throughout their lifetimes. CORE is assigned the task of finding ways to extend MLA's educational scope and reach, help librarians achieve lifelong learning goals, and help promote effective collaboration among institutions and associations that want to be part of a learning community. The CORE task force will also review MLA's education policy statement, Platform for Change, to see if major updating is necessary. Connie Schardt has agreed to chair this important initiative.

Creating and communicating our knowledge is goal three in our strategic plan; in past plans, we have called this our research goal. As a profession, we need to generate more research that defines and extends our knowledgebase and demonstrates our value. The Research Section has this as a primary goal, and other MLA units are also supporting ways to increase our research base and our member capabilities. At this meeting, MLA will award a significant new research fellowship to advance our goals. The fellowship is named in honor of NLM Director Donald Lindberg. The first $25,000 award goes to Catherine Arnott Smith who is assistant professor at Syracuse University's School of Information Studies. Her study will address “the mismatch between terms used by health care professionals and those used by everyone else: patients, those who care about patients, and healthy people in need of health-related information.” Be sure and join us at the awards session tomorrow at 10:30 a.m., where Catherine and others will be honored for their accomplishments.

My third priority was to reach a shared community of users to improve health, corresponding to our new strategic plan goal three, advocacy, and goal five, building a network of partners. It is here that our efforts in legislative work, outreach, and international initiatives receive focus.

One strategy has been to appoint a new Health Information Literacy Task Force with a charge to establish a working definition of “health information literacy” for us and then identify current and potential MLA activities that support it. Also among the task force's charges is to seek potential partners such as the government, foundations, and other associations with similar interests and recommend working relationships with these partners, eventually resulting in an effective communication plan to be sent to all MLA members, partners, and the public. The work of this task force will also support several other goals in the new strategic plan including promoting the abilities of MLA members and establishing MLA as a leading advocate for access to quality health information. The task force is chaired by Neil Rambo.

Last September, I attended a conference in Park City, Utah, called “The Information Therapy Innovators Conference,” sponsored by the company Healthwise. Their idea is that evidence-based information should be prescribed and reimbursed just as any other type of proven therapy. Our profession shares similar goals. My goal at the conference was to promote the expertise of medical librarians as partners in this process.

There are some promising avenues for MLA to explore further with the connections I made. I must tell you that throughout the conference, in hallway and cocktail conversations, I had nothing but a totally positive reaction when I introduced myself as a medical librarian. Somehow we need to translate the admiration and trust we garner on a personal level to a higher profile (and a less taken-for-granted one!) within our institutions and in society.

Another example of new partnerships is MLA's representation on the Web Accreditation Committee of URAC by member Michele A. Spatz. She is quoted in a November URAC press release titled “Consumer Health Online: Closing the Credibility Chasm.” She says

Consumer health librarians and information professionals as a whole are very concerned about how consumers approach and use the World Wide Web for personal health research. They've developed tools, such as hands-on classes and posting quality criteria on their Web sites. The Consumer's Union report confirms what many librarians already know. [7]

Michele has found membership on this committee a very rewarding experience.

On the international front in support of global health initiatives, MLA and its members have been active in the International Federation of Library Associations for many years. And one of our longstanding programs has been supporting a Cunningham fellow from another country to visit libraries in the United States and attend our annual meeting. The International Cooperation Section has worked very hard over the past several years on their “Sister Library Pilot Project.” They identified two libraries, the Medical Library of Holberton Hospital in Antigua and the Medical Research Library of Latvia, with whom to establish a partnership to develop library resources and services and promote improved access to health information in those countries.

The association has taken action on a number of national information issues and policy on behalf of the medical library community through the work of the Governmental Relations Committee (GRC) and the Joint MLA/AAHSL Legislative Task Force, with the able assistance of Mary Langman at MLA headquarters. I encourage you to follow these issues on MLANET's GRC Website. This is incredibly important work undertaken on your behalf and on behalf of our profession. Let me highlight a few examples.

Last May, MLA joined its library association partners to submit a “friend of the court” brief with the U.S. Supreme Court in the Eldred v. Ashcroft case that challenged the constitutionality of the Sonny Bono Copyright Term Extension Act. The Supreme Court heard arguments on October 9 and announced their decision on January 15. Unfortunately, “our side,” ably argued by Lawrence Lessig, did not win the day. Professor Lessig will be giving the McGovern lecture today at 10:30 a.m. Perhaps he will comment on his experience.

In October, I joined the Joint Legislative Task Force on one of their twice yearly visits to Capitol Hill. We broke into three teams and collectively visited sixteen congressional offices. We supported the National Institutes of Health (NIH)/NLM budget, NLM's new building plans, and the Technology, Education, and Copyright Harmonization (TEACH) Act. I wonder if it's just a coincidence that the TEACH Act, which provides some needed relief for the use of copyrighted resources for distance education, passed just a few days later! This is a victory for librarians and educators, and we were a part of it. Also, new legislation, which we support, was introduced by Rick Boucher of Virginia, my home state, and John Doolittle of California to try and reaffirm fair use in a networked environment and rectify some of the potential damage caused by the restrictions of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act. It is referred to as the Digital Media Consumers Rights Act, HR 107. We should applaud our congressional representatives for their efforts in this contentious arena. And last month, in a whirlwind of activity, the task force again visited congressional offices (thirteen to be exact) and hosted a reception at the Rayburn Building honoring our partners in national health information policy.

I was also able to present Dale Dirks, president of Health and Medicine Counsel of Washington, with an honorary membership in MLA for his work on our behalf. Dale is unable to be at our awards ceremony tomorrow, so we took advantage of this photo op!

The memory of those Washington visits—both the whirlwind nature of dashing from one congressional office to the next and the chance to interact with people of influence—is the way I would like to close this talk. My year as president was certainly a whirlwind of activity with a fantastic opportunity to be engaged in important deliberations, to take action when needed, and to meet members around the country. And, there were certainly many people of influence who supported me along the way whom I would like to recognize here. My boss, the dean of the University of Virginia School of Medicine, valued my national service, even though it meant much time away from Charlottesville. All my staff at the Claude Moore Health Sciences Library were key supporters. Without their skilled and dedicated service at the library, I would not have been able to take on this MLA responsibility.

And my husband Bill and our trusty four legged friends, Shadow and Katie, gave me all the love and encouragement that anyone has a right to expect. Thank you, Bill, for being there for me.

And finally, if we are talking about people of influence, I need to thank all of you. You are the peak performers who make the association what it is, and who will determine what it can be. I am counting on all of you to stay on the crest of that wave into the future. Thank you.

References

  • Welsch C. A hui ho, kauai (until we meet again). AAA World 2003 Mar/Apr:35–42.
  • Rogers M. Tackling recruitment: where are new librarians coming from? internships, tuition reimbursement, and cultivating from within may be the keys. Libr J. 2003.  Feb 1. 128(2):40–3.
  • Schneider J, Hobson K, Boser U, Clark K, Schneider J, LaGesse D, and Lim PJ. Special report: America at work; finding work; news you can use. U.S. News World Rep. 2003.  Feb 24. 134(6):81–2.
  • Shipman J, Homan M. Medicine's library lifeline. Libr J. 2003.  Apr 1. 128(6):49–50.
  • Homan JM. The role of medical librarians in reducing medical errors. HealthLeaders News. [Web document]. Nashville, TN: HealthLeaders Inc., 16 Sep 2002 [cited 19 May 2003]. <http://www.healthleaders.com/news/print.php?contentid=38058>.
  • Watkins C. Grassroots report: collective action on RoweCom. Am Libr. 2003.  April. 34(4):87.
  • URAC. Consumer health online: closing the credibility chasm. News Release. 14 Nov 2002 [Web document]. Washington, DC: URAC [cited 8 Sep 2003]. <http://www.urac.org/news_release.asp?navid=news&pagename=news_releases&id=159>.

PLENARY SESSIONS

I, May 4, 2003: The John P. McGovern Lecture: Protecting a Creative Commons for Knowledge

Introduction: Linda A. Watson, AHIP, president, MLA, and Claude Moore Health Sciences Library, University of Virginia Health System–Charlottesville.

Speaker: Lawrence Lessig, Stanford Center for Internet and Society, Stanford University, Stanford, California.

II, May 5, 2003: The Janet Doe Lecture

Introduction: Jacqueline Donaldson Doyle, AHIP, Banner Health System, Phoenix, Arizona.

Being There: The Library as Place: Frieda O. Weise, Health Sciences and Human Services Library, University of Maryland–Baltimore.

III, May 6, 2003: The Joseph Leiter NLM/MLA Lecture

Introduction: Patricia E. Pinkowski, AHIP, Green-Field Library, Alzheimer's Association, Chicago, Illinois.

Making Waves: The Untapped Potential of Medical Libraries to Improve the Public's Health: Roz Diane Lasker, Division of Public Health and the Center for the Advancement of Collaborative Strategies in Health, New York Academy of Medicine–New York.

IV, May 7, 2003: Mentoring: Sharing Experiences for Professional Growth

Session introduction: Patricia L. Thibodeau, AHIP, president, MLA and Medical Center Library, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina.

Introduction: Deborah H. Sibley, Scott Memorial Library, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Speaker: Karen Garman, National Center of Leadership in Academic Medicine, School of Medicine, University of California–San Diego and Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California–Los Angeles.

Introduction: Paula Raimondo, AHIP, Health Sciences and Human Services Library, University of Maryland–Baltimore.

Panelists: Sue Trombley, Arizona Health Sciences Library, University of Arizona–Tucson; Ruth Holst, AHIP, National Network of Libraries of Medicine Greater Midwest Region, Library of the Health Sciences, University of Illinois–Chicago; and Rick B. Forsman, AHIP, Denison Memorial Library, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center–Denver.

Town meeting facilitator: Jean P. Shipman, AHIP, Tompkins-McCaw Library for the Health Sciences, Virginia Commonwealth University–Richmond.

BUSINESS MEETING

Monday, May 5, 2003

The business session was convened by President Linda A. Watson on Monday, May 5, 2003. Ms. Watson introduced Carla J. Funk, CAE, executive director of MLA, who introduced the MLA Board of Directors; the parliamentarian; the sergeant-at-arms; the editors of MLANET, the Journal of the Medical Library Association, and MLA News; and the MEDLIB-L coordinator, Valerie Rankow.

Ms. Funk recognized the vital role that the various MLA chapters play in bringing the benefits and services of the association to members at the regional, state, and local levels. Chapter chairs who were present in the audience were asked to stand and be recognized. Ms. Funk then noted that the diversity and specialized interests of the association are represented by the various MLA sections and special interest groups (SIGs). Sections and SIGs provide significant networking and professional development opportunities for MLA members within their areas of specialization, allowing specific needs and issues to be addressed. Section chairs and SIG chairs were also asked to stand. Finally, the contributions of MLA committees, task forces, and representatives to other organizations were recognized, and the chairs and representatives were asked to stand to be applauded.

President Watson then returned to the podium and asked for a few moments of silence in memory of the following valued members of the association who died during the past year. They are: William Kaye Beatty, Catherine L. Binderup, Susan Jean Feinglos, Frances Humphrey Howard, Kathleen Lese, Nancy Manninen, Mary Minton Netzow, Elizabeth Petgen, Robert Riley, and Winifred Sewell. Ms. Watson noted that their counsel and friendship will be deeply missed.

The sergeant-at-arms verified that the required quorum of 250 MLA voting members was present, and President Watson called upon Secretary Ruth Holst to move adoption of the Rules of the Assembly.

Ruth Holst: The Rules of the Assembly include information on addressing the chair, presenting motions, debating, and voting. These rules are printed on page forty-one of the Official Program. At the direction of the Board of Directors, I move that the Rules of the Assembly as printed in the 2003 Official Program be adopted.

Ms. Watson called for discussion and hearing none called for a vote, and the rules were adopted.

Secretary Holst then noted that a printed copy of the Official Program as proposed by the Board of Directors is in the hands of each registrant for the meeting, and that the agenda for the 2003 business meeting could be found on page thirty-three of the Official Program. She moved that the agenda for the 2003 business meeting of the Medical Library Association be adopted. Watson called for a vote, and the agenda was adopted.

Ms. Watson: In November 2002, ballots for MLA's election of 2003/04 officers, Board of Directors, and Nominating Committee members were mailed to all voting members of the Medical Library Association. A total of 1,473 countable ballots were returned. The Ad Hoc Election Task Force, chaired by Patricia E. Pinkowski, counted the ballots at MLA headquarters on January 5, 2003. The election results were announced in the February 2003 issue of the MLA News, and complete election results, including vote totals, are published in the 2002/03 Annual Report, which will be available on MLANET. Following are the election results: Joanne G. Marshall, AHIP, was elected president-elect. Nancy W. Clemmons, AHIP, was elected for a three-year term to the Board of Directors. Rosalind K. Lett, AHIP, was elected for a three-year term to the Board of Directors. The following were elected to the Nominating Committee: helen-ann brown, Gary Byrd, Jacqueline Donaldson Doyle, J. Michael Homan, Michael Kronenfeld, Julie J. McGowan, Connie Poole, Jocelyn A. Rankin, and Jean P. Shipman.

Ms. Watson moved to the new business section of the agenda and called upon Treasurer Mark E. Funk to present the treasurer's Report.

Mark E. Funk: Good morning. I am Mark Funk, treasurer of MLA. I will present an abbreviated treasurer's report to you today, since the full report is available in the April issue of the MLA News and in the Year in Review that came in your registration packet.

Let me start with a review of 2002. How did last year turn out financially? On revenues of about $2,692,000 we had expenses of a little over $2,667,000 leaving us with a net revenue of $24,705 in our general operating fund.

Breaking this down into our main categories: Our temporarily restricted net assets, which are used to fund our awards, honors, and scholarships, finished the year with $164,883. Our unrestricted net assets, which consist primarily of our stabilization fund, finished with $1,098,186. Our endowments ended up just under $700,000. Despite contributions and other revenues to these assets, all finished below their 2001 values. Overall, we had a decrease in our investment funds of 8.4%. The previous year, 2001, we experienced a decrease of 5% in our investments. That means two years in a row of negative investment returns. We are at the mercy of the general economy, and we are hoping for better results this year.

How does 2003 shape up? We are projecting revenues of almost $2,737,000 and expenses of a little over $2,718,000, creating another year in the black with a net of a little over $18,000.

  • Breaking down our revenue projections for 2003, you see that the annual meeting is the largest contributor, with 37%.
  • Dues contribute only 25% to our total revenue, and half of that is from institutional dues.
  • Our publications do well for us, bringing in 19%.
  • Our various CE programs bring in 9%.
  • A combination of income from corporate fees, chapter services, and mailing list rentals have been combined into a category called general membership, which accounts for 7% of our revenues.
  • Contributing 1% each are awards and scholarships, administrative services, and credentialing.

Here are our projected expenses for 2003:

  • The annual meeting, as you might expect, is the largest expense at 21%.
  • Publications come in second with 15%.
  • Governance and administration is 13%.
  • Administration and support is 12%.
  • General membership support is 10%.
  • Our large CE program will contribute 9% to our expenses.
  • MLANET, which is quickly becoming our most common interaction with the association, is projected to cost 7%.
  • Smaller categories include public relations and research, information issues, awards and scholarships, and credentialing.

The association will be starting several new initiatives this year, and I will highlight just a few. We are offering two new teleconferences this year.

  • The first, on HIPAA, was offered this March. The second teleconference, on consumer health, will be held this fall.
  • We will also be implementing the recommendations from the recruitment task force and intensify our recruiting for the 21st century workforce that our profession needs. Our goal is to increase our membership by 1%.
  • Most of you will be very pleased that we intend to upgrade MLANET, specifically Website navigation and the members only password system. We will also be adding PDA integration to MLANET.
  • Also on MLANET we will be adding the expert searching guidelines and teaching syllabi that are coming from the Task Force to Promote the Importance of Expert Searching. You may recall this task force was created as the association's response to the research tragedy that occurred at Johns Hopkins in 2001.

This is my last treasurer's report, since my term on the board ends with this meeting. While the overall finances of the association are in good shape, I want to point out to the membership a familiar trend. As I mentioned earlier, we have a surplus projected for the year. This surplus acts as a safety buffer, in case of unexpected expenses or important initiatives that demand quick action. Without this buffer, MLA is not as well prepared to react to changing circumstances.

  • In the year 2000, we approved a dues increase. The following year, we had a comfortable surplus of $63,000.
  • For 2002, this surplus declined to $25,000.
  • Our projected surplus for 2003 is $18,000.

As I have mentioned, our investment returns have declined for two straight years, while expenses go up, and new initiatives are enacted to benefit our members. It is too early to propose a dues increase, but it is not too early to at least start contemplating the need for such an increase, depending on the overall economy this upcoming year.

It has been a pleasure to serve on MLA's Board of Directors and as your treasurer. I find it very odd that the three years one serves on the board can simultaneously feel like a very long time, yet also seem like a three day tour of Europe. As you might imagine, a board member is often immersed in association work, such that at night, one's head is filled with nothing but MLA. I would sometimes fall asleep at night, with the words “Medical Library Association” floating in front of me. Sometimes, the letters would swirl and rearrange themselves into different anagrams representing my emotions at the time.

At times, the letters would rearrange themselves telling me that MLA meant: “Occasional Irritable Dismay.” When things were going rough, the letters told me that MLA could: “Elicit Myocardial Abrasions.” In very rare cases, when I was feeling down and grumpy, my subconscious felt that: “Abnormally Idiotic Cases Air.” Despite these occasional negative images, most of the time I had extremely positive feelings, which kept me coming back for more. I think it is the reason we all join and keep renewing our membership, because we find: “Occasional Similarity Bared.” And so, after a very rewarding three years, working with headquarters staff and your MLA officers, who are some of the most incredible people, as of Wednesday afternoon, I can: “Airily Claim Board Cessation.” Thank you.

At the conclusion of the treasurer's report President Watson returned to the podium to welcome Carla Funk, MLA executive director, to present her report titled “MLA by the Numbers.” Ms. Funk quizzed the audience to iterate measures of MLA.

Carla J. Funk: Thank you, Mark and Linda. Through the power of the Internet, we have gotten more input from you, the members, this year than ever before. Headquarters staff and MLA committees have distributed five formal surveys to the membership, or segments of the membership, since the last annual meeting, including a membership survey. There have been several opportunities to comment on the informationist concept and the strategic plan through MLANET, as well as our traditional open forums and chapter meeting opportunities. On behalf of headquarters staff, we want to thank you for your participation.

What has all of this told us about the state of the association as of May 2003? Mark has just given you our financial picture, present and future. I am going to talk about some of our other measures.

One of the goals of the association is to recruit and retain new members and leaders. Today, MLA has more student members than we had in: (a) 1988, (b) 1989, (c) 1990? The answer is 1990. In fact, at 258, we have more MLA student members today than we have had since 1989. Our membership has also increased overall since last year. We now have a total of 4,587 members versus 4,450 members last year. Although institutional memberships have decreased, individual memberships have increased in all categories except for international members. We are particularly happy that membership in both the student and introductory categories has increased this year. Also, more MLA members have both section and chapter memberships today than in 1994. There is a definite shift from institutional memberships to individual memberships. In 1994, almost 56% of respondents were individual members; today it is almost 78%.

MLA is also slightly more diverse today than it has been with about 88% white members versus 93% ten years ago. Asian, Black/African American, Hispanic/Latino, and North American Indian/Alaskan native groups are all represented in MLA and in increasing numbers, except for the Asian segment. Our profession is aging as we all know, with more members in the fifty-to-seventy age range than in 1994 and fewer in the thirty-to-fifty category. However, we do have more members in the twenty-to-twenty-nine age group than we did in 1994; a trend we have noticed for a couple of years. We take this as a positive sign.

A few activities helped to achieve the above results. Headquarters staff coordinated a lapsed-member phonathon in the spring of 2003, the first that we have had in a number of years. Some board members and membership committee members participated as well. We got twenty-eight additional members for our efforts and cleaned up old records in preparation for the next phonathon coordinated by the Membership Committee for January 2004. Also, the Membership Committee's Member Get a Member campaign increased awareness of MLA and brought in new members. Our continuing efforts in minority recruitment also have helped. Besides the scholarships that MLA supports, this year we will sponsor a leadership grant for a mid-career professional through the Association of Research Libraries' (ARL's) diversity program, thanks to support from NLM.

MLA has long supported professional development, or what we are now calling lifelong learning. Over the past association year, how many people participated in MLA-approved CE courses: (a) 7,000, (b) 9,000, or (c) 11,000? The answer is 9,000. Currently, we have 345 courses listed on the Educational Clearinghouse, including five Web-based courses. During the past year, there were thirty-one MLA-sponsored educational opportunities, both face-to-face and at a distance. There were many more offered locally and regionally. According to the 2003 member survey, more members are participating in CE than in 1994, at the annual meeting, at chapter meetings, and through teleconferences. Fewer are participating in non-MLA approved courses.

We have 1,128 members of the Academy of Health Information Professionals. In the 1994 membership survey, about 38% of respondents were members of the academy. In the 2003 membership survey, 46% were academy members. In 1993/94, seventy-six portfolios were processed, and, in 2002/03, 159 portfolios were processed, another positive sign.

We continue to expand the career and mentoring Website thanks to the efforts of the Credentialing Committee and staff with the addition of mentoring guidelines, the new mentoring database, and mentoring resources.

MLA members and staff have also played important roles in advocacy efforts this year. How many people has MLA reached through its advocacy efforts this year? Is it: (a) 90,000, (b) 900,000, or (c) 9,000,000? The answer is (c), nine million. Since May 2002, information about medical librarians and MLA has reached over nine million people through publications such as the New York Times, Chicago Tribune, Miami Herald, American Libraries, Library Journal, and healthleaders.com. Topics ranged from MLA's most useful health Websites to the concept of the informationist and the librarian's role in reducing medical errors. In other advocacy activities, the MLA/AAHSL Legislative Task Force made two visits to Washington, DC, this year to speak to members of Congress about funding for NLM, its new building, and copyright issues, among other things. We are happy to say that NLM's budget for 2003 is $310 million dollars, a 12% increase over 2002, due in part to our lobbying efforts.

What was the most popular site on MLANET in 2002? Was it: (a) Top Ten Websites, (b) jobs, or (c) annual meeting? The answer is (a). In 2002, the most popular site on MLANET was the Top Ten Most Useful Websites, surpassing the jobs site and the annual meeting site. MLANET has also become a powerful tool in keeping our members apprised of the divine/Faxon/RoweCom bankruptcy, providing regular updates, legal tips, and sources for more information. I estimate that over 100 of our members were adversely affected by this situation amounting to at least a $3.5 million loss. MLA is providing the Journal of the Medical Library Association (JMLA) for those affected and is monitoring the cooperation of other publishers. This site was recognized in American Libraries as one of the most complete sites of all the associations.

In creating and communicating our knowledge to the profession and to the public, the association did a number of things. In 2002, how many people visited MLANET per month? Was it: (a) 4,000, (b) 40,000, or (c) 400,000? The answer is (b). The average number of visits per month to MLANET increased 44% over last year to 42,044. Besides the Faxon/RoweCom and mentoring sites, other new information available in the 4,700 pages of MLANET in 2002 included the benchmarking initiative aggregate data tables and interactive reports; an expanded president's site and a new organizational site that includes the board, staff, and information about board and headquarters activities; informationist information including videos of the conference; the new MLANET store; and comment areas for feedback about the informationist and the MLA strategic plan.

MLA also distributed twenty-one editions of MLA-FOCUS, 6,000 communications over MEDLIB-L, published nearly 800 pages of research and information in JMLA and MLA News, 370 portable document format (PDF) documents on MLANET, and sold over 6,000 items, not including JMLA and MLA News. At this meeting, there are 116 presentations and 155 posters, more than ever before. Of all the people responding to the membership survey, 77% thought that MLANET provided useful information for their jobs; 54% subscribed to email discussion lists; and 89% follow MLA-FOCUS links to obtain information from MLANET and elsewhere. Headquarters staff supports fifty-five to sixty-five active email discussion lists, including MEDLIB-L.

Finally, MLA strives to build a network of partners to better serve people working in health care and the public. We have had a several year partnership with the Pew Internet and American Life Project that has brought more people to MLANET to get the benefit of our members' expertise.

MLA has members from how many different countries? Is it: (a) 75, (b) 65, or (c) 55? The answer is (a). We have ninety-nine international members, not including Canada, representing seventy-five countries around the globe. Through our shared legal coalition with the other library associations, we have submitted a dozen letters and testimony on behalf of patron privacy, digital rights, Uniform Computer Information Transaction Act (UCITA), and other copyright issues. We will cooperate with the Canadian Health Libraries Association/Association des bibliothéques de la santé du Canada (CHLA/ABSC) and the European Association for Health Information and Libraries (EAHIL) this year to have a medical librarian's booth at IFLA 2003 in Berlin to let others know what we are doing.

In a year of many extremes, the association has done well and kept moving forward, although sometimes more slowly than we, or our members, would have liked. We have been able to do this because of the extreme efforts of our members and staff. Thank you all.

Ms. Watson returned to the podium to introduce the next order of business, the MLA Annual Report. In the interest of time the annual reports were received in a block, and she asked for any corrections or amendments. There being none, she announced that the reports would be filed as presented.

President Watson then introduced Gayle Willard, incoming chair of the MLA Membership Committee, who announced the winner of the “Member Get a Member” campaign. Ms. Willard noted that a year ago a campaign, “MLA Needs You, You Need MLA,” was started. Each person who recruited a new member received a $25 gift certificate to Borders or Barnes & Noble. The campaign worked so well that MLA decided to offer a grand prize to the person who recruited the most members over the past year. EBSCO, through Lynn Fortney, volunteered to supply a $200 gift certificate to the winner for use at the EBSCO bookstore. Ms. Fortney assisted Ms. Willard in awarding the prize to Mary Ryan of the University of Arkansas. Ms. Fortney reminded Ms. Ryan that the prize was intended to be redeemed for items of personal interest. A second member, Mary Snyder of Texas Women's University, recruited the same number of members and received an EBSCO gift certificate after the MLA meeting.

Ms. Watson returned to the podium to ask if there was any old business, and, there being none, she moved that the meeting be adjourned. She encouraged everyone to attend the session on the following day for recognition of outgoing board members, reception of incoming board members, and the inaugural address of President-Elect Patricia Thibodeau. The business meeting was followed by a stretch as members created a wave across the room, and then President Watson commenced the Awards Ceremony.

AWARDS CEREMONY

Monday, May 5, 2003

Immediately after the business meeting, President Watson began the Awards Ceremony by thanking Jacqueline Wilson, chair of the Awards Committee, and Lynn Burke, chair of the Grants and Scholarship Committee, as well as all of the jury members for their time and effort.

President Watson announced that Senator Patrick Leahy, Democrat from Vermont, would be presented with the Distinguished Public Service Award at the Legislative Task Force Meeting in Washington, DC, in the fall of 2003. Senator Leahy, as chair of the Senate Judiciary Committee, addresses copyright and intellectual property legislation. He is a liberal member of the Senate who was one of the key early supporters of the TEACH Act, and he cosponsored the reauthorization legislation for the Institute of Museum and Library Services. In addition, Senator Leahy, as a member of the Senate Appropriations Committee, has consistently supported the NIH doubling effort.

Next, President Watson announced that Roz Diane Lasker was unable to attend the awards ceremony and would receive her certificate for presenting the Joseph Leiter NLM/MLA Lecture the following day at the annual meeting. Her lecture was titled “Making Waves: The Untapped Potential of Medical Libraries to Improve the Public's Health.”

The preceding day, Lawrence Lessig, a Stanford law professor and founder of the Stanford Center for Internet and Society, delivered the 2003 John P. McGovern lecture and received his award and certificate. Mr. Lessig's engaging lecture was titled “Protecting a Creative Commons for Knowledge.”

President Watson then announced Lori Gluckman, a graduate student at Queens College, School of Library and Information Studies at the City University of New York–Flushing, as the MLA Scholarship winner, and Martha Preddie, a graduate student in the School of Information and Library Science at the University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill, as the recipient of the MLA Scholarship for Minority Students.

Saroj Bhatia was the 2003 Cunningham Fellow. Ms. Bhatia is director of Library and Mutimedia Services at Canberra Hospital in Canberra, Australia. Ms. Bhatia arrived in the United States in early February of 2003 and traveled throughout the United States learning from her colleagues. Ms. Bhatia shared brief remarks about her visit. She thanked MLA for providing her with the opportunity to visit U.S. libraries. Thanks were also made to the host libraries and their staffs and the host families who extended hospitality and support. She described the experience as a great one that will help her “rip, mix, and burn it and use it” when she returns to Canberra.

EBSCO Information Services donates funds annually to MLA's grants endowment to provide up to $1,000 each for as many as four librarians. The funds are used for travel and related expenses of attending MLA's annual meeting. Marceline Doranski, Elizabeth Hill, Hanna Kwasik, and Karen Lippert received the 2003 EBSCO/MLA Annual Meeting Grants. Ms. Doranski is currently employed as academic resident librarian and visiting instructor at the Library of the Health Sciences, University of Illinois–Chicago. Ms. Hill is currently employed as clinical reference specialist, at William T. Wood Medical Library at Kootenai Medical Center, Couer d'Alene, Idaho. Ms. Kwasik is currently employed as a serials librarian at the Library, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center–New Orleans. Ms. Lippert is currently employed as reference librarian at the Oregon Health & Science University Library–Portland.

President Watson then noted that the Hospital Libraries Section (HLS) sponsors an annual grant to provide librarians working in hospital and similar clinical settings with the support needed for educational or research activities. This year's HLS/MLA Professional Development Grant was awarded to Wendy Larson. Ms. Larson is employed as a medical librarian at Rice Memorial Hospital, Willmar, Minnesota. Her grant was used to attend the 2002 Midwest Chapter's Annual meeting in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

The David A. Kronick Traveling Fellowship was established in 2001 with an endowment from the Bowden-Massey Foundation. It is awarded annually to an MLA member to cover expenses involved in traveling to three or more medical libraries in the United States or Canada for the purpose of studying a specific aspect of health information management. President Watson announced the second-year recipient as Michael Kronenfeld, director of the Learning Resource Center, Arizona School of Health Sciences–Mesa. Mr. Kronenfeld plans to visit three libraries across the United States to explore the use of emerging technology to improve the library's effectiveness.

The Donald A. B. Lindberg Research Fellowship was established in 2001 with contributions from MLA members and other people and companies in the health care community. It is awarded annually through a competitive grant process to a qualified health care professional, researcher, educator, administrator, or librarian. MLA established the fellowship to fund research that links the information services provided by librarians to improved health care. The first year's recipient, Catherine Arnott Smith, School of Information Studies at Syracuse University, Syracuse, New York, plans to use her fellowship to research the “consumer vocabulary” problem: the potential mismatch between terms used by health care professionals and those used by the people who need their services: both patients and the people who care about them. The fellowship is named in honor of Dr. Lindberg, director of the National Library of Medicine (NLM) since 1984, in recognition of his significant national and international achievements at NLM, the world's largest medical library. President Watson introduced Dr. Lindberg who spoke briefly about the newly established Donald A. B. Lindberg Research Fellowship.

Ms. Watson next explained the Medical Informatics Section (MIS) grant. The grant was established in 1997 and is given to up to two individuals to support career development activities that will contribute to the advancement of the field of medical informatics. This year Marcy Brown and Mark Vrabel each received $1,500 as recipients of the MIS/MLA grants. Ms. Brown is medical librarian at the Health Sciences Library, Forbes Regional Hospital, Monroeville, Pennsylvania, and will use her award to attend a course on health information and decision support systems. Mr. Vrabel is medical librarian at the library of the Oncology Nursing Society, Pittsburgh, and plans to use his award to fund his time and expenses in an information project at his institution. Mr. Brown was unable to attend the MLA annual meeting, and his certificate was sent to him after the meeting.

The MLA Continuing Education Grant is awarded annually to an MLA member to assist with the development of theoretical, administrative, or technical aspects of medical librarianship. Beshia Popescu, medical librarian at the Minthorn Memorial Library, St. John Medical Center, Longview, Washington, was presented with the grant, which she put to use to participate in several continuing education courses offered at MLA '03.

The Board of Directors named five association members as Fellows of the Medical Library Association. Fellows are chosen for their outstanding contributions to health sciences librarianship and to the advancement of the purposes of MLA. President Watson introduced the following lifelong Fellows of MLA with these words:

  • Jana Bradley is associate professor and director of the library science program at the School of Information Studies, Syracuse University, Syracuse, New York. She is among the distinguished MLA members selected to become an MLA Fellow. A past president of MLA, Ms. Bradley is noted for her superior knowledge of hospital library management. From 1990 to 1994, she served as MLA's representative to the Joint Commission on the Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO). Her work on MLA's behalf was crucial in helping hospital librarians define their vital role as part of the health care team. In 1984, she won the Eliot prize for her extraordinary work as senior editor of the book, Hospital Library Management. One of the association's most active members, Ms. Bradley also served as chair of the 1997 MLA Nominating Committee, a member of the 1981–1984 Board of Directors, and a member of MLA's Hospital Libraries Section. Ms. Bradley was among MLA's list of Top 100 Medical Librarians, compiled during the association's centennial year. Unfortunately, Ms. Bradley was unable to attend the meeting and received her certificate via mail.
  • Rosalind Dudden: Along with her many awards and accolades, including this year's President's Award, Rosalind Dudden can now include the prestigious honor of MLA Fellow to the list. Currently as medical librarian, Tucker Medical Library, National Jewish Medical and Research Center, Denver, Colorado, she epitomizes the skills and qualifications necessary to obtain MLA Fellow status. She was instrumental in the development of the first edition of MLA's Hospital Library Standards during her tenure as chair of the Hospital Library Standards and Practices Committee. A promoter of the use of technology in hospital libraries, Ms. Dudden created the state of Colorado's first hospital Website, writing or loading over 300 pages. She has also served as chair of MLA's Hospital Libraries Section and of the Consumer and Patient Health Information Section (CAPHIS) Website Task Force. Her work on the task force contributed to the CAPHIS Top 100 Websites You Can Trust for consumers. An MLA member committed to sharing the vast knowledge that she has gained throughout her career, Ms. Dudden has taught more than fifteen courses and presented many papers and posters. Her contributions to the MLA's Benchmarking Network will serve to benefit MLA members for years to come.
  • Sherrilynne Fuller: I am pleased to welcome Sherrilynne Fuller, director of the Health Sciences Library and Information Center at the University of Washington–Seattle, as an MLA Fellow. Ms. Fuller has served the association and the profession at national and regional levels. She has served as the first chair of the newly established Donald A. B. Lindberg Research Fellowship Jury, as chair of the Medical Informatics Section, and as a member of both the MLA Board of Directors and the 1991/92 Nominating Committee. During the second term of the Clinton administration, she was a member of the President's Information Technology Advisory Committee (PITAC). In addition to her duties as director of the Health Sciences Library and Information Center, Ms. Fuller serves as director for the National Network of Libraries of Medicine Pacific Northwest Region and as professor for the Information School and adjunct professor for the Department of Health Services, School of Public Health and Community Medicine. She received the honor of presenting the 1999 Janet Doe Lecture.
  • J. Michael Homan: It is with great pleasure I recognize J. Michael Homan as an MLA Fellow. In the more than twenty-nine years since he first joined MLA, he has proved to be an exceptional leader within the association as well as the health sciences information profession. Mr. Homan is a past president of MLA and a past editor of the Bulletin of the Medical Library Association (BMLA). As editor of BMLA, Mr. Homan started the publication's electronic evolution, providing the BMLA table of contents electronically. Mr. Homan also served as MLA's first managing editor of books and was elected to the MLA Nominating Committee. A Distinguished Member of the Academy of Health Information Professionals, he has served as chair of a number of committees, topical sections, and task forces including the BMLA Editorial Board, Scholarship Committee, Pharmacy and Drug Information Section, Section Council Advisory Committee, and Information Systems Task Force. Mr. Homan is currently director of the Mayo Clinic Medical Libraries in Rochester, Minnesota.
  • Frieda O. Weise, executive director, Health Sciences and Human Services Library, University of Maryland, is also being honored as one of this year's MLA Fellows. One of the profession's most respected leaders, Ms. Weise is the recipient of several honors including the National Library of Medicine (NLM) Director's Honor Award. She has served MLA in many national and regional leadership roles. In addition to serving as an MLA past president, she was elected to the 1989–1991 MLA Board of Directors, for which she served as treasurer, and was twice elected to the MLA Nominating Committee. She was also selected as chair of the MLA Public Services Section. Having taught numerous MLA continuing education courses, Ms. Weise is known as an expert in the area of health statistics and is the author of Health Statistics: An Annotated Guide to Information Resources, published in 1996.

President Watson continued by announcing the selection of an MLA Honorary Member. Each year the officers and the Board of Directors have the option to designate individual nonmembers of the association as honorary members of MLA to recognize the outstanding contributions they have made to the advancement of the association's purposes. This year, the board has selected Dale P. Dirks, president of Health and Medicine Counsel of Washington, to receive honorary membership. Since 1992, Mr. Dirks has served as MLA's and the Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries' (AAHSL's) Washington representative on Capitol Hill. He and his staff do an outstanding job of educating Congressional staff and leaders about the role and value of information to support health care, education, and research. He plays a key role in keeping us informed of the issues and guiding MLA in the process of communicating our message on Capitol Hill. Mr. Dirks was unable to join us, and his certificate was presented to him on April 1 at the joint MLA/AAHSL Legislative Task Force Meeting in Washington, DC.

The next presentation was the Lois Ann Colaianni Award for Excellence and Achievement in Hospital Librarianship. This award is given to a professional who has made significant contributions to the profession in overall distinction or leadership in hospital library administration or service; who has produced a definitive publication related to hospital librarianship, teaching, research, or advocacy; or who has developed or applied innovative technology to hospital librarianship. This year's recipient is Ysabel Bertolucci, health sciences librarian at Kaiser Permanente Medial Centers, Oakland and Richmond, California. Ms. Bertolucci is known throughout the profession as a stellar leader in hospital librarianship and the overall broader profession. Over the years, she has served in leadership roles for MLA and other national and international organizations. She is cochair of the 2003 National Program Committee and has served as chair of the MLA Credentialing Committee and as a chair of IFLA's Health and Biosciences Libraries Section. Ms. Bertolucci is a Distinguished Member of the Academy of Health Information Professionals.

The Estelle Brodman Award for the Academic Medical Librarian of the Year was established with a gift from Irwin H. Pizer and is given to an association member who has made outstanding contributions to academic medical librarianship as demonstrated by excellence in performance, publications, research, service, or a combination thereof. President Watson presented the Estelle Brodman award to Susan London, executive associate director for the Ruth Lilly Medical Library, Indiana University–Indianapolis. Ms. London is known throughout the profession as course director for the Indiana University School of Medicine's highly ranked fourth-year clerkship in medical informatics. She has been awarded two Teaching Excellence Recognition awards for her work as course director. She was also instrumental in the development of HealthWeb, which was awarded the 1998 ISI/Frank Bradway Rogers Information Advancement Award. In addition, she is a Distinguished Member of the Academy of Health Information Professionals. Ms. London exemplifies the kind of leadership qualities envisioned by the Brodman Award.

The Louise Darling Award for Distinguished Achievement in Collection Development in the Health Sciences recognizes distinguished achievement in collection development in the health sciences. It was established by Ballen Booksellers and is endowed by Blackwell North America. This year's award is presented to Frank O. Mason, dental librarian at the Wilson Dental Library, University of Southern California–Los Angeles. Mr. Mason is a leader in the promotion of dental subject collection development and has worked to educate fellow health information professionals, community librarians, dental students, and professors on dental information issues. Mr. Frank is coauthor of “A Basic List of Recommended Books and Journals for Support of Clinical Dentistry in a Non-Dental Library,” published in the BMLA in July 1997. He is also editor/moderator of the MLA Dental Section email discussion list and DENTALIB.

The Thomson ISI/Frank Bradway Rogers Information Advancement Award is sponsored by Thomson ISI and recognizes outstanding contributions in the application of technology to the delivery of health sciences information, to the science of information, or to the facilitation of the delivery of health sciences information. This award was presented to Ralph D. Arcari and Edward R. Donnald for their innovative work in creating and overseeing the electronic fund transfer system (EFTS) to streamline billing for interlibrary loan and document delivery. EFTS is an outstanding application that saves participating health sciences libraries time and money, virtually eliminating the need to create invoices and checks and is being used by other libraries throughout the country. Dr. Arcari is associate vice president for academic resources and assistant professor and library director at the Lyman Maynard Stowe Library, University of Connecticut Health Center–Farmington. Mr. Donnald is librarian at the Pyrtek Learning Resource Center, Health Science Library, Hartford Hospital, Hartford, Connecticut.

The Majors/MLA Chapter Project of the Year Award recognizes excellence, innovation, and contribution to the profession of health sciences librarianship by an MLA chapter and is sponsored by Majors Scientific Books. Ms. Watson announced that this year's award is presented to the New York-New Jersey Chapter of the Medical Library Association for their innovative continuing education project “Mini Medical School for Librarians.” This project allowed librarians to experience medical education as information providers and as consumers. Kathel Dunn, 2001/02 president of the chapter, and Suzanne Crow, cocourse director for the Mini Medical School, accepted the award.

Next, President Watson officially introduced Rosalind Farnam Dudden as recipient of the President's Award. From time to time, the officers and the Board of Directors see that an exceptional contribution has been made to the profession and the goals of the association and, therefore, elect to give the President's Award recognizing the significant contribution. This year, the award is presented to Roz Dudden for her invaluable role in supporting the vision, development, and implementation of the MLA Benchmarking Implementation Task Force. Ms. Dudden has been an active member in MLA for many years and recently ended her term as an MLA Board member. She has worked tirelessly on the successful MLA Benchmarking Network Task Force and project since 1999. The benchmarking efforts have given MLA and its members an opportunity to learn more about benchmarking, compare data, establish best practices, and identify and work with a benchmarking partner. As chair of the Outcomes Team for the Benchmarking Network, Ms. Dudden compiled massive amounts of data and put it into user-friendly format for MLA membership. The team also developed composite library tables now available on MLANET. In addition to her outstanding contributions to the MLA Benchmarking Network, Ms. Dudden has served in more than sixty elected or appointed offices at the national, chapter, and section level since 1977. She was named a fellow this year, received the Rogers Award in 1995, and the Ida and George Eliot Prize in 1981. She is also a Distinguished Member of the Academy of Health Information Professionals and is currently health sciences librarian at the Tucker Memorial Medical Library, National Jewish Medical and Research Center in Denver, Colorado.

The Ida and George Eliot Prize is presented for a work published in the preceding calendar year, which has been judged most effective in furthering medical librarianship. The prize is awarded this year to Frieda O. Weise and Thomas D. McMullen for their article, “Study to Assess the Compensation and Skills of Medical Library Professionals Relative to Information Technology Professionals,” that appeared in the July 2001 issue of the BMLA. The article presented a major new analysis of library compensation. Mr. McMullen was unable to attend and his certificate was mailed to him.

The Rittenhouse Award is presented annually by the Medical Library Association for the best unpublished paper on health sciences librarianship or medical informatics written by a student in an ALA-accredited program of library and information studies or a trainee in an internship in health sciences librarianship or medical informatics and is sponsored by the Rittenhouse Book Distributors in King of Prussia, Pennsylvania. This year's recipient is Tracy Dana for her paper, “The Past, Present and Future of Clinical Librarianship.” Ms. Dana is currently a graduate student at the Syracuse University School of Information Studies, Syracuse, New York.

A highlight of each MLA annual meeting is the Janet Doe Lecture on the history or philosophy of medical librarianship. Earlier in the morning, Freida O. Weise delivered this year's lecture titled, “Being There: The Library as Place.” It was the third time that Ms. Weise was called to the podium to receive notice for her numerous accomplishments. Ms. Weise was honored earlier in the ceremony as a Fellow and as a winner of the Ida and George Eliot Prize.

The highest honor that the Medical Library Association confers on any individual is the Marcia C. Noyes Award. President Watson asked Robert M. Braude, last year's winner of this special distinction, to introduce Naomi Broering, the 2003 Noyes Award recipient, after a few words from Henry L. Lemkau, who nominated Ms. Broering. Bob Braude spoke of Naomi's career with the following:

Robert Braude: One of the delights of receiving the Noyes Award, besides the award itself, is our tradition of having the past recipient present the award to the succeeding recipient. I was informed by MLA's unofficial historian, T. Mark Hodges, himself a Noyes laureate, that this tradition is not that old, dating back only to 1997. Nevertheless, traditions have to start some time, and I am sincerely pleased that I can be part of this one, even if I have to follow Henry. And every now and then a happy coincidence results from this tradition. This is especially true today since I have known Naomi since her first day as a health sciences library intern.

Thirty-seven years ago (that was 1966 for those of you who do not want to do the math) a quiet, modest, reserved, shy, very proper young woman appeared at the University of California–Los Angeles (UCLA) Louise Darling Biomedical Library and, yes, I am describing Naomi. It was her first day as a biomedical library intern as they were known then, and she was continuing her education courtesy of a postgraduate fellowship, the first of many grants she would go on to obtain. I, of course, was already a seasoned professional having been a health sciences librarian for two years. When I met her, despite her shy demeanor, I sensed her drive and passion for the profession. Naomi and I have remained friends throughout these thirty-seven years, so you know how privileged I feel to be able to present the Noyes Award to her today.

But, of course, this history just increases the pressure, and I struggled with how to approach this presentation. I thought, well, I could describe the criteria for the Noyes Award and compare Naomi's accomplishments to them. One criterion is sustained and notable achievement. Okay, Naomi has certainly had a distinguished career as a health sciences librarian from her first position as acquisitions/reference librarian at the Norris Medical Library, University of Southern California, through chief librarian, Children's Hospital of Los Angeles, to director, Biomedical Information Resources Center, and medical center librarian, Dahlgren Library, Georgetown University, then executive director and director of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, South Central Region, at the Houston Academy of Medicine-Texas Medical Center Library, to her present position, director, William C. Herrick Community Health Care Library, La Mesa, California. There were some other stops along the way, but this selection clearly indicates Naomi's abilities as a health sciences librarian.

In the area of research, Naomi has been extremely productive on her own as well as in a number of collaborations with other health and technology professionals. The terms, LIS and mini-MEDLINE are familiar to most of us, and some of us recognize MacClinical Workstations, Biosynthesis & Knowledge Network, and Medical Facts File as parts of the Georgetown IAIMS project, and a smaller number are familiar with the Full Text Image Research Project, another of Naomi's research endeavors.

As for notable, Naomi has been recognized with many honors and awards, testimony both to her achievements and to the effect of those achievements throughout our profession. Of many, MLA's Frank Bradway Rogers Information Advancement Award and being elected president of MLA are just two examples of how Naomi's achievements have been recognized by her health sciences librarian colleagues. Receiving the Special Libraries Association Winifred Sewell Award and being elected a Fellow of the American College of Medical Informatics are two that demonstrate the recognition she has received from other professionals.

A second criterion is service and leadership. Again, Naomi's record is extensive, consisting of twenty separate contributions to MLA through committees, CE instructor, the board, and culminating in president. Naomi has twice that many contributions distributed over several collateral organizations or associations. Add to this, her service as editor, Bulletin of the Medical Library Association (now Journal of the Medical Library Association), a Herculean task (I know because I fought with her over one of my articles), and there can be no doubt of her qualifying on this criteria. This was just one of seven editorships Naomi has held. And if all this were not enough, Naomi has been an active participant in national and international activities. She has served the National Library of Medicine on several committees and task forces, as well as the National Academy of Sciences and the American Physiological Society. And, she has been involved in planning or presenting sixteen programs in nine countries. And in her spare time, Naomi has been a frequent lecturer and a faculty member of six different institutions.

A third criterion is utility, and here I could again mention, LIS, mini-MEDLINE, and IAIMS. Through her development of LIS and its companion module, mini-MEDLINE, Naomi provided many health sciences libraries with affordable technology. Her IAIMS efforts, especially the documentation of the process, revealed for many of us the intricacies, pitfalls, and techniques for success of IAIMS projects.

A fourth criterion is durability, and Naomi made her first presentation on automation in 1981 and her most recent in 1997 (sixteen years if you do not want to do the math). Now, I do not know whether the durability criterion refers to the contributions or the contributor, but I will give Naomi credit for both.

The last criterion is comprehensiveness. Well, Naomi has been active and recognized for her contributions in the area of health sciences librarianship, technology, education, and professional service. Seems pretty comprehensive to me.

So, I could catalog Naomi's accomplishments against the criteria, but I thought, no, that would be too boring.

So, how about basing my presentation on excerpts from the numerous letters written in support of her nomination? That might be an interesting approach. One nominator emphasized Naomi's contributions as a teacher, mentor, innovator, administrator, author, editor, scholar, and role model. Pretty complete. Another pointed out her foresight in utilization of information technology and her understanding of the ways that the Internet would impact libraries. A third identified her contributions to the development of library automation, the field of informatics, and library management systems and characterized her as always ahead of the pack in developing useful information products and services. She was noted for being an entrepreneur, for seminal work in the development of health sciences librarianship, for her over 100 articles and two books, for her development of shareable computer applications and her ability to import applications developed elsewhere, as an early adopter of new teaching technologies, for her development of the Bulletin by introducing themed symposia on timely topics, and for her successful grant writing career resulting in over $25 million from government and private providers.

But then I thought, no, excerpts from letters would be too obvious; I had to focus on something different.

So, what could I come up with; what single event or accomplishment in this marvelous career could I use to unequivocally substantiate the awarding of MLA's highest award to Naomi?

To me, Naomi's outstanding achievement has been her leadership within our broader health professional community confirmed by the recognition and respect she has earned from our health professional and information technology colleagues. Naomi's hallmark is her leadership in the larger arena of health care, research, education, and informatics that not only reflects on her but on all of us. She has been a pioneer in demonstrating the contributions health sciences librarians can make, building a bridge to our health sciences peers and colleagues, and she has made that bridge easier to cross for many of us.

Let me mention just some examples of Naomi's leadership. Certainly, there was LIS and mini-MEDLINE, developed collaboratively with computer technologists and health professionals but led and guided by Naomi's vision. Then IAIMS. Among the original NLM-supported IAIMS institutions, Naomi was the only librarian to serve as the sole principal investigator on all three phases. The creation of shareable applications and the central role of the medical library were two key features of the IAIMS program as originally envisioned and the Georgetown IAIMS project, under her leadership, was arguably the sole original program that accomplished both.

Her abilities in the informatics arena were recognized by her collaboration with medical informatics faculty colleagues in the difficult tasks of technology transfer.

She was elected secretary and member of the Board of Directors of the American Medical Informatics Association and treasurer of the American College of Medical Informatics.

She has competed successfully for grant funding and has spoken and taught workshops at health professional and information technology conferences.

Her contributions to health sciences librarianship alone would be sufficient to deserve the Noyes Award, but the respect and recognition she has earned from our health professional peers and colleagues adds that much more. I have been fortunate to observe examples of Naomi's leadership and the respect with which her efforts are held, and I have always credited her with making it easier for many of us to be welcomed into the broader world we work within. She demonstrated the important contributions we can make to the complex world of health sciences education, research, patient care, and technology.

It is fitting that Naomi's demonstration of the leadership that health sciences librarians bring to the table, along with her many accomplishments in health sciences librarianship itself, be recognized by our association's highest award. It gives me the sincerest pleasure to present the 2003 Marcia C. Noyes Award to my friend and colleague, Naomi C. Broering.

President Watson then presented the award to Ms. Broering who accepted with the following words:

Naomi C. Broering: Thank you. I am tremendously honored and deeply touched to receive the Marcia C. Noyes Award. Never in my wildest dreams did I expect to receive this incredible honor.

Ever since my first MLA meeting in 1967, the association has been an integral part of my life. I have not missed an annual meeting, and I am planning to stick around for a few more. My role model and mentor, Louise Darling, from the UCLA Biomedical Library, took me to my first meeting and introduced me to the world of MLA.

MLA has given me so many opportunities to grow and contribute professionally. Even in the early days of my career I was given a chance to show my strengths working on MLA committees and publications.

We are fortunate that MLA provides a platform where we can exchange dialogues with colleagues to push ourselves to greater things than we can accomplish on our own. MLA is a pedestal to showcase our work and to learn about advances within our profession.

My former employer, Bobby Carter at Georgetown University, gave me freedom and encouragement to experiment and write papers for MLA meetings. The MLA meetings have given me the opportunity to interact with brilliant leaders and colleagues like Nina W. Matheson, Erich Meyerhoff, Lucretia W. McClure, Fred W. Roper, Henry Lemkau, J. Michael Homan, and all of you.

The NLM, our great bastion of information and technology advances, has been extremely supportive and important throughout my entire career. Dr. Don Lindberg and the NLM leadership have always provided invaluable resources and initiatives that give us national and universal exposure.

The institutions where we work are the laboratories where we test and implement many of our new ideas, but our employers do not always recognize what we do. They cannot appreciate the real impact of our achievements, but our peers do. Our peers know the challenges we face when we are trying to implement change, to introduce advances, and to improve library services. MLA allows for recognition among our peers, and this is extremely meaningful. Our work is extremely valuable; as medical librarians we help enrich the work of health professionals and researchers whose discoveries multiply and benefit all of us in the medical community and the universe.

Recently, I became engaged in opening a library with a focus on consumer health, to directly help the public find information to become healthier, prevent illness, and enrich their daily lives. I am grateful to MLA's CAPHIS and NLM's MEDLINEplus, which helps make this work easier and successful.

Lastly, I wish to thank the association membership, my colleagues who supported me, everyone who played a hand in my career, dedicated library staff, and my husband, Greg Chauncey, who constantly encourages me, especially when I face challenges that I think are insurmountable. I know that my parents are looking down from the heavens and smiling. Thank you all from the bottom of my heart.

President Watson concluded the Awards Ceremony by reminding attendees that each year, the awards ceremony and luncheon serves as an important reminder of the many accomplishments our peers have made to the profession. It simultaneously provides the encouragement to continue working toward the next level of achievement. In recognizing these individuals, we affirm the “best and brightest” in the field of health sciences librarianship. She concluded the presentation, and thanked attendees for joining her.

The presentation of awards was followed by an Awards Celebration Luncheon with seating around the swimming pools of the resort.

PRESIDENTIAL INAUGURAL ADDRESS AND MLA '04 INVITATION

Tuesday, May 6, 2003

President Watson began the session by extending thanks and presented certificates to retiring board members Lynn Fortney and Mark Funk. She then presented a special plaque to Carol G. Jenkins as retiring immediate past president of MLA. Next, President Watson welcomed and introduced incoming board members Nancy W. Clemmons, Rosalind K. Lett, and Joanne G. Marshall. President-Elect Patricia Thibodeau rose to present Linda A. Watson with an outgoing presidential gift, a presidential cup.

President Watson then presented to the assembly and passed the presidential gavel to the MLA 2003/04 president, Patricia Thibodeau, who gave her inaugural address.

Inaugural address: Seizing the Power of Our Value

Good morning! I hope that you are all having a wonderful time in this beautiful setting, meeting old and new colleagues, and catching the wave of energy and knowledge being shared at this meeting.

Before I talk about the priorities and issues for the coming year, I do want to take a minute to express how honored I am to be chosen as one of your leaders.

Little did I know that when Phyllis Gillikin, my colleague in the North Carolina Area Health Education Center (AHEC) system, asked me to serve on the Hospital Libraries Section's membership committee, that I would start on a path of involvement in the Medical Library Association, which would bring me here today. As we will hear tomorrow, having mentors can change your professional life, and Phyllis mentored me in the importance of working with and for librarians for a greater good of the profession.

Since then, I have had the benefit of working with outstanding colleagues; many are in the audience today, who have mentored me in collaboration, teamwork, professional service, and leadership. So I thank you for supporting me during my years of growth and over the next year as I serve you as president.

One of the greatest challenges for MLA leadership is to establish the priorities for the coming year and the future. Over the past year, many of you have helped us with our strategic thinking and planning for the association on a long-range basis. And, Linda Watson in her speech talked about those values, challenges, and the vision that we need to address and pursue to prepare us for the future.

But each year, the MLA Board must translate those greater goals and visions into the priorities for the association. First, we must look at the activities that were put into motion in prior years by our MLA leaders and not abandon those initiatives, which continue to further our profession, our value, and our association.

The next step is to look to the distant horizon and make sure we are preparing ourselves for the future and staying vital to our institutions, health care, and our society. You will notice how well the priorities mesh with our long-range goals and visions in the strategic plan.

Most importantly, we must also determine what must be addressed now—what are the greatest concerns and issues that need to be worked on over the next twelve months. Initially, I was somewhat overwhelmed by the thought of having to identify a certain number of priorities from all the key issues that are swirling through librarianship and health care. But then I started to listen to you, MLA's members, to find out the hot issues, the major concerns.

My first step was to meet with the councils who represent your diverse interests and opinions, and I heard a lot. I listened at the annual meeting in Dallas as we networked among ourselves; I heard debates in the hallways and in our business sessions. Email discussion lists, committee meetings, library conferences, chapter meetings, and email exchanges all became opportunities for identifying the priorities for the coming year.

And, yes, I really read those annual objectives and reports prepared by sections and chapters to find out what was foremost in your minds. My list of potential priorities got longer and longer.

What did I hear?

  • This is an incredibly exciting time for our profession. Information when and where it is needed is a reality.
  • Technology brings library resources to the point of care, point of research, and point of need.
  • We have found new roles as educators and information experts in the context of evidence-based practice.
  • We are viewed as partners in information management in many settings and bring expertise to those partnerships, whether it be an understanding of genetic resources, JCAHO accreditation planning, or teaching students how to manage information.

Now more than ever, the overwhelming array of electronic resources requires our special skills in selecting, evaluating, acquiring, and organizing the best resources for quality information. Combined with our technical skills and knowledge, we can be a valuable asset to any institution coping with information overload and trying to ensure quality care and further biomedical research

We have also become recognized on a national level as a reliable source of consumer health information. National publications have cited members' work in developing guidelines and lists for the top ten and top 100 health Websites.

However, I also heard it is a time when we feel our value being challenged?

Everything is free on the Internet? Right? Why do we need budgets for library materials? What's the big deal with finding information? Google is the perfect search engine. I can find everything there? If only we librarians would get with it and be willing to deal with electronic resources, our patrons could have access to everything they ever wanted.

The myths of the Internet and free access are all pervasive, and user expectations have well exceeded our budgets and the realities of electronic resources. Publishers are creating exciting new products that provide new functionality for our users, and our users are demanding access to these new e-resources. But publishers are also creating pricing models that put these new resources well beyond the limits of our budgets, and we are not able to deliver exactly what our users want

And now we face an economic downturn. Health care financing was already an issue. But now there are state budget woes and loss of investment income. Our library budgets stand in a line of fire just when the quality of care, reduction of medical errors, the need for fast-paced research discoveries, and access to quality consumer information are growing issues for our society.

Even some of those enduring values that Michael Gorman describes so vividly in his book are being challenged in today's world by the USA PATRIOT Act and other legislation. We are finding that our core values of free access to information and the right to privacy in pursuing that information are being threatened. Over the past year, the recurring and underlying theme I heard again and again, was this challenge to our value and worth as librarians and to the value of our libraries.

Last year, Linda asked us to become extreme librarians—champions for quality health information, and, through our collective voice and your efforts, we have become visible experts in consumer health. We began addressing the recruitment and education issues facing our profession. We continued strengthening our knowledgebase for our members and other health information experts.

Now we need to become champions of our power, our value, and our qualities as librarians. During this coming year, we need to demonstrate the power of our value to the leaders in our institutions, health care, and society. Within MLA, we must continue to use the power of our collective voice in advocating our essential role in delivering quality information and in responding to issues that impact our libraries, our values, and our communities. As librarians, we must continue to capture and expand our professional knowledgebase. We need to pursue research that quantifies and describes the qualities of our contributions, and we must explore new roles in a rapidly changing biomedical environment. It is through activities such as these that we will seize the power of being librarians, demonstrate the power of our role, and ensure our enduring value to society.

So how will we do this? In working with the MLA Board, we have identified these initiatives and priorities for the coming year. Some of these priorities seem too broad or too vague, but it is often difficult to pick just one approach, or find the best approach, or fully understand what the response should be in the future. There are ongoing initiatives that cannot be abandoned, and there will be issues that we never envisioned that will have to be addressed. MLA also needs input from you on our strategies and action plans before final decisions are made. So think of these as a broad framework that we can work within, and that we may need to change our course as new pressures demand that we go in different and unanticipated directions.

First priority: advocate our value

Our first priority is to advocate our value. As MLA members, we must recognize and promote our value to our institutions, the health care enterprise, and society.

We have already begun discussions on how we can reach our institutional and national leaders with the message of our value. Michael Homan's article for health care administrators was the first foray into promoting us to health care leaders. We have started brainstorming with MLA's communication firm, PCI, on how we can further reach administrators and health professionals, as well as the general public.

Each one of us needs to become an advocate within our institution, the local community, and our state. MLA has created a revitalized Advocacy Toolbox, taking our knowledge gained from working with the media and combining it with the value of information study and other resources developed by MLA and its members. The Advocacy Toolbox will also bring together resources—the wealth of data already collected by MLA—on salaries and compensation so that members can fight for better salaries at the local level.

Whether you see our future as librarians, clinical medical librarians, information specialists, research associates, or informationists, we must continue to explore expanded roles for our profession in biomedical research, patient care, and education. While some may not see us in the operating room today, I think we need to explore that and other possibilities and how we provide information in context. Our newly appointed task force will help us delineate possible models and paths for expanded and enhanced roles.

We must also be strong advocates of the issues that are important to us and our libraries. Through MLA we need to vocalize our concerns about the publishing crisis and policies and legislation that may block or place restrictions on the free access to information. As new issues arise, we must be ready to take action and let our collective voice be heard and our opinions known.

Second priority: build our community

The second priority focuses on the continuing need to build our community of health sciences librarians. We need to ensure our enduring value through recruitment and retention of today's and tomorrow's librarians and leaders.

The recruitment issues of our profession will not go away in the next three, five, or fifteen years. We have had task forces and committees studying the problems and developing action plans. Now we need to implement those plans. A new ad hoc committee will specifically focus on implementing recruitment and retention strategies, while the Membership Committee and others work on these issues, as well as on retaining and attracting MLA members.

We have found that we must have timely responses to members' issues. We cannot wait until the next conference call or annual meeting. We need to be polling members and receiving feedback and input throughout the year. The forums on Sunday were just one of the many methods that MLA can use to ensure we are addressing key issues in an effective manner as well as learning about additional problems confronting our profession and our libraries.

The strength of our association is through its members and our volunteer leadership who develop and implement the strategies that give us value and make us powerful as an association. We must continue to keep current and new members involved in the association's work. We had a wonderful pool of applicants this year, but unfortunately we had more volunteers than positions, but over the year we will continue to find ways to engage members through new task forces and special activities.

MLANET is becoming a critical platform for achieving many of our goals. This year we need to conduct usability studies and make it more responsive to member needs. We need to use it creatively to collect and create new resources to support our work as librarians. MLANET can be an excellent platform for sharing the wealth of knowledge-based library information that is within each of us. We need to select and implement technologies that will support our research, our publishing, our educational programs, and our community of health sciences librarians.

Third priority: encourage lifelong learning

As professionals we need to encourage lifelong learning, and that is our third priority. We must ensure that we remain vital and responsive to our environment and that our value is recognized and sought well into the future by integrating new technical and content expertise into our traditional skills.

My concern is not only for our recognized value today, but that our profession will have an enduring value and retain its vitality well into the future. As librarians we have excellent skill sets. We are the ultimate system analysts, only without the high tech title. But like most professionals, we need to continue to hone those skills and incorporate new ones into our daily approaches to information management.

One of the challenges is now to deliver MLA's educational program in a timely and relevant manner, when and where our members need it. Just-in-time and distance learning are not just the domain of formal academic programs. There may be times when training is needed today by a member, and not next May or next month, and when relevant education must be defined by you, the learner.

The online education task force has explored the role that distance learning can play in MLA's delivery of educational programs. In addition, the Task Force to Develop the Center of Research and Education, referred to as CORE, has been charged with developing a concept that brings together the various components of our educational programs, including mentoring, research, and our knowledgebase so that educational resources are easily accessible to our members and other information professionals when they are needed. As the task forces finalize their investigations and planning, MLA must work with the Continuing Education Committee, MLANET Editorial Board, and other groups to implement CORE.

The specialization program in consumer health is already growing in popularity. In addition to documenting the attainment of expertise in current roles, these specialization programs may be excellent pathways for acquiring the skills and knowledge for new and expanded roles of providing services in context. MLA must continue its work in assessing the value of specialization and planning for new opportunities for documenting skills and expertise.

Technology is an essential part of our profession and how we deliver services. Many of us have become technology leaders in our organizations. We need to use the data from the Hay study and other resources to promote the importance of those skill sets within our institutions. But we must not ignore that as a profession we need to continue to experiment with new technologies and document their value to information services.

Fourth priority: create a professional knowledgebase

As practitioners and professionals we must continue to create a professional knowledgebase. This knowledgebase is our important fourth priority area. To do this, we must capture and share the value of our knowledge, experiences, and skills.

While we support evidence-based practice in biomedicine, we must also pay attention to strengthening our own knowledgebase. Linda and I had fascinating discussions with Bill Detmer about the delivery of information to health professionals. Yet when he asked what professional librarians needed to do their job, all we could think of were the standard reference tools used by clinicians and researchers. We have very few tools for ourselves on our best practices.

We have a tremendous amount of knowledge shared during meetings, on email discussion lists, and through informal communications. Somehow, we need to harvest, filter, and organize our own knowledgebase so that we can work efficiently and effectively as professionals. MLANET is the logical repository and platform for developing new mechanisms for creating accessible practice-based knowledge.

Additional research is needed into our best practices for delivering biomedical information. MLA, through its Research Section and scholarship opportunities such as the Lindbergh fellowship, must continue to encourage members to pursue research that will build our knowledgebase and capture our value.

Fifth priority: embrace global networks

Our final but equally important fifth priority is to embrace global networks by strengthening our value at the global level through diverse partnerships and international initiatives. The quality of health care is no longer just a local, state, or national matter. Access to patient care and health information is a global issue. All we have to do is watch the recent SARS outbreak to realize how many countries are involved, how quickly research and care guidelines can be shared across borders, and how a local outbreak can become an international concern.

With the advent of the Internet, we have overcome many of the hurdles of international partnerships—faster communication, shared health data, and more equal access to major health information resources, such as PubMed and MEDLINE. Given these global changes, it is time that MLA reviews its international partnerships and initiatives and develops a new action plan for the future. A global initiatives task force is being appointed to begin this work. However, we cannot forget all those individual librarians and libraries in MLA, who faced the old hurdles and have sustained long and valuable relationships with international partners for many years. MLA must develop ways to identify and recognize those who are already involved on a global level.

Global partnerships are not just limited to libraries and librarians. MLA must build bridges with associations and societies that have the same interests as MLA and who are involved in the distribution of biomedical information. As new groups emerge on a national or international level, we need to contact them and offer to become partners and collaborators, offering them our expertise and knowledge in biomedical information and health care issues.

It is also imperative that we remain vigilant on legislative issues. Changes in the copyright law remain a prime source of concern for all libraries. But we must also pay attention to bills that impact health care funding and research, as well as bioterrorism measures that have the potential of limiting the freedom of access to information resources.

This is the year for MLA to focus on advocacy for librarians. As the Librarian Avengers Website proclaims, librarians rule. We have professional degrees and are masters of data systems and computer interfaces and interactions. We wield unfathomable power—we can just as easily hide a key resource as find data the patron never knew existed. Librarians are all knowing and all seeing, because our knowledge extends beyond our library field. We do bring order to the chaos of the Internet and paper and electronic resources.

While some of you may think it is time to take a more dramatic approach to advocacy as this Website has done, I believe that by focusing on these priorities in MLA we can seize the power of the skills, knowledge, and contributions that are inherent in our daily work and promote our value to health care and biomedical education and research.

I hope that each of you will seize your own power as librarians and support MLA's initiatives for ensuring our enduring value. Thank you.

At the completion of her address, Ms. Thibodeau invited Gary Freiburger, associate chair of the 2004 National Program Committee, to give the official thanks for the 2003 annual meeting.

Gary Freiburger: As we can all tell, the 2003 National Program Committee, yelled, “surf's up,” donned their baggies, and did an “extremely excellent” job of designing a way cool program with Xtreme Rides, California Chats, and totally awesome CE to help meeting dudes and dudettes “Catch the Wave” for the 103rd meeting of the Medical Library Association.

The Local Assistance Committee has succeeded majorly in helping the membership avoid wipeouts while surfing the shoals and swells of San Diego.

The totally rad MLA headquarters staff and the professional planners (Hall Erickson) have had little time for California Dreamin' while putting in long, gnarly hours facilitating planning of the annual meeting.

So please join me in a round of applause to express our profound appreciation and deep-felt thanks to the 2003 National Program Committee, the Local Assistance Committee, the medical librarians and citizens of San Diego, and MLA headquarters and professional planners for their outstanding efforts.

Next, Mary Joan Tooey, and others from the 2004 National Program Committee invited members to attend MLA '04 in Washington, DC, May 21 to 26, where the theme will be “Seize the Power.” The invitation consisted of a skit and slide presentation. At the end of the official invitation, President Thibodeau extended hers as well, and the session ended.

SECTION PROGRAMMING

Section Programming I, Sunday, May 4, 2003

Leadership and Management, Collection Development, Hospital Libraries, and Technical Services Sections and African American Medical Librarians Alliance SIG. Contributed Papers Session: Building Castles in the Shifting Sand: Sculpting Partnerships and Alliances to Withstand the Incoming Tide #1

Moderator: helen-ann brown, Weill Cornell Medical Library, New York, New York.

Surfing the Tsunami of Service Quality: The AAHSL/ARL Partnership in Exploring Outcomes Assessment through LibQUAL+: Tamera P. Lee, Robert B. Greenblatt Library; Medical College of Georgia–Augusta; James Shedlock, AHIP, Galter Health Sciences Library, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois; and Rick Forsman, AHIP, Denison Memorial Library, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center–Denver.

Tribal Collaborations: Patricia A. Auflick, Arizona Health Sciences Library, University of Arizona–Tucson; Catherine Burroughs, Pacific Northwest Regional Medical Library, University of Washington–Seattle; Elaine Graham, AHIP, Pacific Southwest Regional Medical Library, University of California–Los Angeles; Claire Hamasu, National Network of Libraries of Medicine MidContinental Region, Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library, University of Utah–Salt Lake City; Jeannette McCray, AHIP, Arizona Health Sciences Library, University of Arizona–Tucson; Molly McGetrick, Pacific Northwest Regional Medical Library, University of Washington–Seattle; Sharon A. Lezotte, Health Sciences Library and Informatics Center, University of New Mexico–Albuquerque; Neil Rambo, Pacific Northwest Regional Medical Library, University of Washington–Seattle; Angela B. Ruffin, National Network of Libraries of Medicine Outreach Office, National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, Maryland; Roy Sahali, Pacific Northwest Regional Medical Library, University of Washington–Seattle; Stephanie Weldon, Denison Memorial Library, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center–Denver; and Fred B. Wood, Office of Health Information Programs Development, National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, Maryland.

Don't Go into the Water Alone: Using Consortia to Expand Electronic Resources: Patricia Wilson and Anne M. Linton, AHIP, Himmelfarb Health Sciences Library, The George Washington University, Washington, DC.

The Virtual Academic Library Environment (VALE): Benefits and Outcomes of Participation in a Statewide Consortium for Licensing Electronic Resources: Judith S. Cohn, University Libraries, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey–Newark, and Kerry A. O'Rourke, AHIP, Robert Wood Johnson Library of the Health Sciences, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey–New Brunswick.

Building and Leading the Bioinformatics Core for the South Carolina Biomedical Research Infrastructure Network (SC BRIN): Ruth A. Riley and Sarah H. Gable, AHIP, School of Medicine Library, University of South Carolina–Columbia.

Leadership and Management, Hospital Libraries, Technical Services, and Medical Library Education Sections and Clinical Librarians and Evidence-Based Health Care SIG. Contributed Papers Session: The Extreme Librarian #1

Moderator: Jane Blumenthal, AHIP, Knowledge Management and Dahlgren Memorial Library, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, DC.

Library Leads Coordination of Campus Approach to Wireless Networking: Technology's Not the Problem!: Nancy T. Lombardo, Wayne J. Peay, and John C. Bramble, Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library, University of Utah–Salt Lake City.

Digital Video Broadcasting: Plug and Play … Not Quite Yet!: Nancy T. Lombardo and Wayne J. Peay, Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library, University of Utah–Salt Lake City.

Hear Us Roar: Establishment of a Center for Health Care Informatics Education and the Evolution of the Organizational Raison D'être for the Academic Health Sciences Center Library: Guillaume Van Moorsel, and Colleen Kenefick, AHIP, Center for Healthcare Informatics Education; Spencer S. Marsh, Health Science Center Library; and Jane Yahil, Health Sciences Center, School of Medicine; Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York.

The Librarian Who Directs Medical Informatics: Linda Hogan, Information Services Division, Pittsburgh Mercy Health System, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Reach Out! Marketing a Virtual Knowledge Service: Alison Turner, Nick Rosen, MCSP, and Philip Vaughan, National Electronic Library for Health, National Health Service Information Authority, Birmingham, United Kingdom.

Public Health/Health Administration and Medical Informatics Sections. Contributed Papers Session: Staying Afloat in a Sea of Data: Lessons in Public Health Informatics

Moderator: Marie T. Ascher, Medical Sciences Library, New York Medical College–Valhalla.

Teaching Public Health Informatics: The Five-Year Experience: Will Olmstadt, AHIP, Library, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center–Dallas; Gale G. Hannigan, AHIP, Informatics for Medical Education; and Joe M. Williams, Medical Sciences Library, Texas A&M University–College Station.

Developing an Interactive Website to Support Teaching of Public Health Informatics: Brynn E. Mays, John Vinton Dahlgren Memorial Library, and Brian Boston, Center for New Designs in Learning and Scholarship, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, DC.

Providing Access to Data Sets for Public Health Professionals: Service Development, Outreach, and Use Patterns: Peggy Tahir, Min-Lin Fang, and Janet Cowan, Library and Center for Knowledge Management, University of California–San Francisco.

Assessing the Potential of Handheld Computing Applications in Public Health: Terry Henner, Savitt Medical Library, University of Nevada School of Medicine–Reno.

Healthy People 2010 Information Access Project: Evangeline Alexander, National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, Maryland.

Consumer and Patient Health Information, Public Services, Chiropractic Libraries, and Public Health/Health Administration Sections. Contributed Papers and Invited Speakers Session: The Crest of the Wave—Cool New Health Information Resources for Consumers

Moderator: Naomi C. Broering, AHIP, Herrick Community Health Care Library, La Mesa, California.

Electronic Access to the Wave—Cool New Health Information Resources for Consumers: Angela B. Ruffin, National Network of Libraries of Medicine, National Network Office, National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, Maryland.

BestTreatments.org: Bringing Evidence to Patients: Tamara M. Rader and Andrea K. Lane, Unified Ltd., BMJ Publishing Group, London, United Kingdom.

What Do Consumers Really Want?: Planning for a Regional Consumer Health Website: Julia F. Sollenberger, AHIP, Health Science Libraries and Technologies and Medical Informatics, Edward G. Miner Library, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York, and Bernie L. Todd Smith, AHIP, Werner Library, ViaHealth, Rochester, New York.

Health Information Hispanic Outreach: New Resources along the Rio Grande: Virginia M. Bowden, AHIP, Library, University of Texas Health Science Center–San Antonio; Debra G. Warner, Medical Library, Regional Academic Health Center, University of Texas Health Science Center–San Antonio, Harlingen; Cynthia Olney, Academic Informatics Services; and Evelyn R. Olivier, AHIP, Library; University of Texas Health Science Center–San Antonio; Frederick B. Wood, Office of Health Information Programs Development; and Elliott R. Siegel, Health Information Programs Development; National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, Maryland; and Graciela Reyna, University of Texas Health Science Center–San Antonio.

Hospital Libraries Section. Contributed Papers and Invited Speakers Session: Hang Ten! Utilizing Standards and Benchmarking Data

Moderator: Sharon Jorski, Library, Mike Monroney Aeronautical Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.

Using the Balanced Scorecard to Show the Value of Library Services: Susan C. Whitmore and Suzanne F. Grefsheim, NIH Library, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland.

Riding the Wave from Benchmarking to Bucks: Ysabel R. Bertolucci, AHIP, Health Sciences Library, Kaiser Permanente Medical Center, Oakland, California; Lynn Van Houten, AHIP, Health Sciences Library, Kaiser Permanente Medical Center, Vallejo, California; and Leeni Balogh, AHIP, Health Sciences Library, Kaiser Permanente Medical Center, Santa Rosa, California.

Sink or Swim: Making Sense of Productivity and Workload Measurement: Sharon A. Phillips, AHIP, Wayne State University Library System, Detroit, Michigan.

Waves Combined: The Standards for Hospital Libraries 2002 and the Benchmark Network: Jeannine Cyr Gluck, AHIP, Medical Library, Eastern Connecticut Health Network, Manchester, Connecticut, and Rosalind F. Dudden, AHIP, Tucker Memorial Medical Library, National Jewish Medical and Research Center, Denver, Colorado.

Waves of Numbers: How to Use and Interpret the Benchmarking Network Tools: Rosalind F. Dudden, AHIP, Tucker Memorial Medical Library, National Jewish Medical and Research Center, Denver, Colorado.

Public Services, Corporate Information Services, Health Association Libraries, and Research Sections. Contributed Papers and Invited Speakers Session: The Changing Shoreline: Virtual Real-time Reference

Moderator: Barbara Slater, AHIP, University of California–San Diego, La Jolla.

Evaluating the Need for an Electronic Reference Service within an Academic Health Sciences Library System: Renae E. Barger, Health Sciences Library and Informatics, and Nancy H. Tannery, Health Sciences Library System, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Virtual Reference: Developing Guidelines for Librarians: Sandra L. De Groote, Library of the Health Sciences, University of Illinois–Chicago.

Virtual Real-Time Reference: Charles R. McClure, Information Use Management and Policy Institute, Florida State University–Tallahassee.

Relevant Issues, Federal Libraries, Public Health/Health Administration, Consumer and Patient Health Information, and Hospital Libraries Sections. Contributed Papers and Invited Speakers Session: Knowing When to Get Out of the Water: Delivering Disaster-Related Public Health Information

Moderator: Michael Scott, Fairview-University Medical Center Library, Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Knowing When to Get Out of the Water: Delivering Disaster-Related Public Health Information: Peter Brewster, Department of Veterans Affairs, VA Medical Center-EMSHG, Indianapolis, Indiana.

Prevention Pays: National Library of Medicine/Pan American Health Organization Partnership Helps Health Professionals Get Information before Disasters Strike in Central America: Stacey J. Arnesen, Specialized Information Services; Victor Cid, Office of Computer and Communications Systems; and Martha Szczur, Specialized Information Services; National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, Maryland.

Bioterrorism Information Resources: Patricia A. Auflick, Arizona Health Sciences Library, University of Arizona–Tucson.

Pharmacy and Drug Information Section. Invited Speakers Session: 2003 EMBASE Lecture

NicVax™, an Experimental Nicotine Vaccine to Prevent and Treat Nicotine Addiction—A Review of Pre-Clinical and Clinical Studies: Robert B. Naso, Quality, Regulatory and Product Development, Nabi Biopharmaceuticals, Rockville, Maryland, with Ali Fattom, Sofiane Ennifar, Scott Winston, Steve Fuller, and Gary Horwith, Nabi Biopharmaceuticals, Rockville, Maryland.

Section Programming II, Monday, May 5, 2003

Leadership and Management, Collection Development, Hospital Libraries, and Technical Services Sections and African American Medical Librarians Alliance SIG. Contributed Papers Session: Building Castles in the Shifting Sand: Sculpting Partnerships and Alliances to Withstand the Incoming Tide #2

Moderator: helen-ann brown, Weill Cornell Medical Library, New York, New York.

Building on Sand: Flexibility and Portability Are Essential: Diana McDuffee, North Carolina Area Health Education Center (NC AHEC) Library and Information Service Network; and Mary Beth Schell, AHEC Digital Library Project; and Holley Long, AHEC Digital Library Project; Health Sciences Library, University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill.

Shooting the Curl: Enhancing Real Time Reference with Health Information Experts: Kay E. Deeney, AHIP, Heidi T. Sandstrom, RN, and Andrea Lynch, National Network of Libraries of Medicine Pacific Southwest Region, Louise M. Darling Biomedical Library, University of California–Los Angeles.

Building Bridges: A Hospital Library and a Cancer Resource Room Bring a Digital Information Project to Health Care Professionals: Deborah L. Jameson, RN, and Julia S. Whelan, Treadwell Library, Massachusetts General Hospital–Boston.

FreeShare to the Rescue! Elaine Graham, AHIP, Andrea Lynch, and Julie K. Kwan, AHIP, National Network of Libraries of Medicine Pacific Southwest Region, Louise M. Darling Biomedical Library, University of California–Los Angeles.

Building a Federation of Partners to Create a National Multimedia Digital Library: Sharon Dennis, Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library, University of Utah–Salt Lake City; Sebastian Uijtdehaage, HEAL Project, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California–Los Angeles; Chris Candler, HEAL Project, School of Medicine, University of Oklahoma–Oklahoma City; and Sandra McIntyre, HEAL Project, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California–Los Angeles.

Medical Informatics Section and Molecular Biology and Genomics SIG. Contributed Papers Session: Bioinformatics: A New Wave of Research, a New Wave of Service

Moderator: Michele R. Tennant, AHIP, Health Sciences Center Libraries and University of Florida Genetics Institute, University of Florida–Gainesville.

Evaluating a Modular Curriculum Designed to Create the New Bioinformationist Professional: Jennifer A. Lyon, Rebecca Jerome, Taneya Koonce, Margaret (Peggy) Westlake, and Nunzia Giuse, AHIP, Eskind Biomedical Library, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee.

Bioinformatics: Library and Information Science Students Ride the Cusp of the Wave: Diane G. Schwartz, AHIP, Libraries and Archives, Medical Library, Kaleida Health, Buffalo, New York.

Meeting the Need for Library-Based Support in the Emerging Field of Bioinformatics: Stephen Cammer, University of California–San Diego Libraries and Graduate Program in Bioinformatics, and Susan Starr, University of California–San Diego Biomedical Library, University of California–San Diego Libraries, University of California–San Diego, La Jolla.

Development of an Information Service Program in Molecular Biology and Genetics: Ansuman Chattopadhyay, Molecular Biology and Genetics; Barbara A. Epstein, AHIP; Patricia C. Mickelson; and Nancy H. Tannery; Health Sciences Library System, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Support for Bioinformatics Investigators: Studying Needs Based on Best Practices: Wendy G. Wu, Deborah Charbonneau, and Ellen Marks, Shiffman Library, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan.

Nursing and Allied Health Resources and Public Health/Health Administration Sections and Mental Health and Outreach SIGs. Contributed Papers Session: Building Lighthouses on Far Shores: Services to Underserved Health Professionals

Moderator: Keith Cogdill, National Network of Libraries of Medicine, National Network Office, National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, Maryland.

The Digital Library as a Lighthouse Beacon Providing Access to Licensed Electronic Resources for Health Care Providers Working with Underserved Populations: MaryBeth Schell, Diana McDuffee, and Holley Long, Health Sciences Library, University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill.

docMD (Document Mediated Delivery): Eric H. Schnell, John A. Prior Health Sciences Library, The Ohio State University–Columbus.

Selling to Distant Shores: Roger Russell, AHIP, Laupus Library/Outreach Department, East Carolina University, Greenville, North Carolina.

Taking Your Apple to School: Health Information for School Nurses: Dolores Z. Judkins, AHIP, Library, Oregon Health & Science University–Portland.

Health Information Outreach to Parish Nurses in Maryland Faith Communities: Alexa Mayo, Mary Joan Tooey, AHIP, Patricia Hinegardner, AHIP, Bradley Gerhart, Laura Hileman, and Kristine Holmes, RN, Health Sciences and Human Services Library, University of Maryland–Baltimore.

Public Services, Medical Library Education, and Research Sections and African American Medical Librarians Alliance SIG. Contributed Papers Session: Library Instruction on the Half Shell: Technique Versus Technology

Moderator: Stewart Brower, Health Sciences Library, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York.

Evidence-Based Practice and Information Literacy Skills: A Perfect Partnership: Karen L. Joc, Biological Sciences Library, University of Queensland–Brisbane, Australia.

Modifying Instructional Techniques to Manage Complexities in Technology: The Guide to Medical Literature Searching, an Atypical Approach: John J. Orriola, Shimberg Health Sciences Library, University of South Florida–Tampa.

Streaming Video and Electronic Surveys: Using New Technologies for Teaching Informatics in Distance Learning Classes: Janet G. Schnall, AHIP, and Terry Ann Jankowski, AHIP, Health Sciences Libraries, University of Washington–Seattle.

E-Evolution in a Distance-Learning Program: Blending Technique with Technology: Mary Snyder, School of Library and Information Studies, Texas Woman's University–Denton.

Research Section, Collection Development, Federal Libraries, Hospital Libraries, and Medical Library Education Sections and Clinical Librarians and Evidence-Based Health Care SIG. Contributed Papers Session: Shoot the Pipeline with Evidence-Based Librarians: Original Research and Practical Methods

Moderator: Alice E. Hadley, AHIP, Guam Medical Library, U.S. Naval Hospital, Barrigada, Guam.

Evaluating the Effectiveness of Clinical Medical Librarian Programs: A Systematic Review of the Literature: Gary D. Byrd, AHIP, Health Sciences Library, University at Buffalo (SUNY), Buffalo, New York, and Kay C. Wagner, AHIP, Wegner Health Science Information Center, University of South Dakota School of Medicine–Sioux Falls.

What Are User Surveys Telling Us?: Are We Listening? Suzanne F. Grefsheim and Susan Whitmore, NIH Library, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland.

What Did They Do Before It Was Online? Measuring Information-Seeking Behavior of Clinicians Prior to Initiation of Access to Electronic Resources: Barbara A. Epstein, AHIP; Nancy H. Tannery, Information Services; and Charles B. Wessel; Health Sciences Library System; and Cynthia S. Gadd, Center for Biomedical Informatics; University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Evidence-Based Databases Versus Primary Medical Literature: An In-House Investigation on Their Optimal Use: Taneya Y. Koonce, Eskind Biomedical Library, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee; Clista Clanton, Biomedical Library, University of South Alabama–Mobile; and Garad M. Davis, Shannon Mueller, Katherine E. Szigeti, and Nunzia B. Giuse, AHIP, Eskind Biomedical Library, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee.

Beyond Therapy: Evidence-Based Diagnosis—Quality of Existing Systematic Reviews and Feasibility of Searching the Literature: Sam Vincent, BMJ Publishing Group, London, United Kingdom.

Technical Services, Collection Development, and Nursing and Allied Health Resources Sections. Contributed Papers Session: Swimming in the Sea of Electronic Resources: Meeting the Challenges #1

Moderator: Maggie Wineburgh-Freed, AHIP, Norris Medical Library, University of Southern California–Los Angeles.

Trolling for Data: Website Usage Statistics to Support Collection Development Decisions: Leilani A. St. Anna, AHIP, Emily Hull, Stanley Florek, and Debra S. Ketchell, AHIP, Health Sciences Libraries, University of Washington–Seattle.

Staying Afloat in the Raging Seas of Electronic Journal Management: Heidi Nickisch-Duggan, Summer Brady, and Andrew Brady, Lommen Health Sciences Library, University of South Dakota School of Medicine–Vermillion.

A Web-Enabled Database for Electronic Full-Text Journals with a Decision Support System for Collection Management: Ann G. Hulton, Kalyani Parthasarathy, and Scott Turnbull, Health Sciences Center Library, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia.

Shibboleth: The Next Generation of Remote Access?: Jane L. Blumenthal, AHIP, Dahlgren Library, and Michael Neuman, Library-IT Collaborations, University Information Services, Georgetown University, Washington, DC.

Infrastructure for Collaboration: A Holistic Approach to Library Integration: Annette M. Williams, Qinghua Kou, Taneya Koonce, and Deborah H. Broadwater, Eskind Biomedical Library; Dario A. Giuse, Informatics Center; and Nunzia B. Giuse, AHIP, Eskind Biomedical Library; Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee.

Consumer and Patient Health Information, Cancer Librarians, Pharmacy and Drug Information, Chiropractic Libraries, and Public Health/Health Administration Sections and Molecular Biology and Genomics SIG. Contributed Papers and Invited Speakers: Through Tempests and Storms: Vaccines, Biologicals, Patient Education, and Environmental Health

Moderator: Lucy Thomas, AHIP, Reeves Medical Library, Cottage Hospital, Santa Barbara, California.

Is the Environment Hazardous to Our Health?: Toxics Where We Work, in Our Neighborhoods, and Homes: Ruth M. Heifetz, Deparment of Family and Preventive Medicine, School of Medicine, University of California–San Diego, La Jolla.

Biodiversity, Conservation, and Utilization: Patient Empowerment: Marian Hicks, Carl S. Cleveland, Jr., Memorial Library, Cleveland Chiropractic College, Los Angeles, California.

The Influenza Vaccine: The Eternal Battle: Jennifer Lyon, Eskind Biomedical Library, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee.

Historic or Cutting Edge? Consumer and Practitioner Interest in Public Health Information: Kristine M. Alpi, AHIP, Public Health Library, New York City Department of Health & Mental Hygiene, New York, New York.

History of the Health Sciences Section and Complementary and Alternative Medicine SIG. Contributed Papers and Invited Speakers Session: Beachcombing for a Cure: History and Current Developments in Botanical Medicine

Moderator: Anne Maria Frketich, Offices of the Surgeon General, Armed Forces Medical Library, Falls Church, Virginia.

Eclectic Legacy: The Contributions of Early American Botanical Literature to Modern Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM): Michael A. Flannery, Lister Hill Library, University of Alabama–Birmingham.

And Here's to You, Mrs. Grieve: Thyme to Revisit Those Old Herbal Books: David J. Owen, Library and Center for Knowledge Management, University of California–San Francisco.

Beautiful Botanicals: Nature's Original Healing “Art”: Pamela M. Rose, Health Sciences Library, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York.

Plants from Many Healing Landscapes: Herbal Medicines Used by Diverse Cultures: Julia S. Whelan, Treadwell Library, Massachusetts General Hospital–Boston, and Lana Dvorkin, Center for Integrative Therapies in Pharmaceutical Care, Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences–Boston.

Elizabeth Blackwell—The Forgotten Herbalist?: Bruce E. Madge, DHMSA, Information, Patient Experience and Public Involvement, National Patient Safety Agency, London, United Kingdom.

Public Health/Health Administration, Dental, International Cooperation, Consumer and Patient Health Information, and Relevant Issues Sections and Outreach; Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgendered Health Sciences Librarians; and African American Medical Librarians Alliance SIG. Contributed Papers and Invited Speakers Session: Caught in the Whirlpool: Information Needs of and Outreach Services for At-Risk and Underserved Consumer Populations

Moderator: Matthew Wilcox, School of Epidemiology and Public Health Library, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut.

Buoyed by Success: Migrant Workers Learn to Access Online Information: Gabriel Rios and Kelly Near, Claude Moore Health Sciences Library, University of Virginia–Charlottesville.

Tribal Outreach: Patricia A. Auflick and Jeanette McCray, AHIP, Arizona Health Sciences Library, University of Arizona–Tucson.

Television Outreach to Residents with Limited English or Literacy Skills: Eris Weaver, AHIP, Redwood Health Library, Petaluma Health Care District, Petaluma, California.

Consumer Health Information: AIDS Information Outreach for Urban Poor Women: Kathleen B. Oliver, Welch Medical Library; Jeri Mancini, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics; and Holly Harden and Susan Rohner, Welch Medical Library; Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland.

Health Information Needs of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgendered Youth: Mark Schuster, School of Public Health, and Garth Meckler, University of California–Los Angeles.

Dental Section. Invited Speaker Session: Tsunami! New Publishing Paradigms and Health Sciences Libraries

Moderator: Leah Krevit, Dental Branch Library, University of Texas Health Science Center–Houston.

Computing in Dentistry: Merging Books and Electronic Media: Titus Schleyer, Center for Dental Informatics, School of Dental Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Hospital Libraries, Corporate Information Services, Health Association Libraries, Consumer and Patient Health Information, Nursing and Allied Health Resources, and Chiropractic Libraries Sections and African American Medical Librarians Alliance SIG. Invited Speakers Session: Up Periscope: Who's Watching Your Information?

Moderator: Sharon Jorski, Library, Mike Monroney Aeronautical Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.

The Challenges of Wireless Security and the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA): Barry Shelton, PE, Gray Cary Warer and Freidenrich LLP, San Diego, California.

The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA): Burden or Opportunity?: Maria Faer, Health Sciences Corporate Compliance, Office of the President, University of California, Oakland, California.

Section Programming III, Tuesday, May 6, 2003

Educational Media and Technologies, Collection Development, and Public Services Sections. Contributed Papers Session: Library Content for Portable Handheld (PDA) Devices

Moderator: Mari Stoddard, Arizona Health Sciences Library, University of Arizona–Tucson.

Just Another Format”: Providing Library Services to Personal Digital Assistant (PDA) Users: Denise Koufogiannakis, John W. Scott Health Sciences Library, and Pam Ryan, University of Alberta Libraries, University of Alberta–Edmonton, Canada.

A Personal Digital Assistant (PDA)-Based Alerting Service for Clinicians: E. Diane Johnson, AHIP, and Deborah A. Ward, AHIP, J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library; Paul E. Pancoast, Chetan R. Soni, and Joyce A. Mitchell, Department of Health Management and Informatics; and Wil Reeves and Chi-Ren Shyu, Department of Computer Engineering and Computer Science; University of Missouri–Columbia.

Optimizing Personal Digital Assistant (PDA) Content for Preclinical Medical Education: Brynn E. Mays, John Vinton Dahlgren Memorial Library; Brian Boston, Center for New Designs in Learning and Scholarship; Jane L. Blumenthal, AHIP, Knowledge Management; and Taeyeol Park; John Vinton Dahlgren Memorial Library; Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, DC.

Implementing a Clinical Personal Digital Assistant (PDA) Program for Nursing Students: Karen Crowell, AHIP, Julia Shaw-Kokot, AHIP, and Francesca Allegri, Health Sciences Library; and Judy Miller, RN, School of Nursing; University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill.

Leadership and Management, Hospital Libraries, Technical Services, and Medical Library Education Sections and Clinical Librarians and Evidence-Based Health Care SIG. Contributed Papers Session: The Extreme Librarian #2

Moderator: Laurie Thompson, AHIP, Libraries, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center–Dallas.

Is There an Informationist in Our Future?: helen-ann brown, Marie Ascher, AHIP, and Diana J. Cunningham, AHIP, Medical Sciences Library, New York Medical College–Valhalla.

Is There a Role for Informationists in a Biomedical Research Setting?: Susan M. Pilch, NIH Library, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland.

Environmental Issues in the Management of a Team of Extreme Librarians: Thomas G. Basler, Department of Library Science and Informatics; Nancy C. McKeehan, Library; Glenn A. Fleming, Department of Library Science and Informatics; Barbara A. Carlson, AHIP, Library; and David E. Rivers, Department of Library Science and Informatics; Medical University of South Carolina–Charleston.

Extreme Searching: One Library's Experience with Conducting Systematic Reviews: Heather Munger, Stewart M. Brower, Karen Buchinger, Sharon Murphy, AHIP, Thomas E. Pirrung, Shannon Wilson, and Amy G. Lyons, AHIP, Health Sciences Library, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York.

An Analysis of the Importance of Subject and Biostatistics Knowledgebase to Final Determination of Article Relevance: Rebecca Jerome and Nunzia B. Giuse, Eskind Biomedical Library; and S. Trent Rosenbloom, Department of Biomedical Informatics; Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee.

Medical Library Education Section. Contributed Papers Session: Rising Waves

Moderator: Catherine A. Smith, Center for Science and Technology, Syracuse University, Syracuse, New York.

Access to Electronic Health Information for the Public: An Analysis of a Subset of National Network of Libraries of Medicine Projects Conducted by Public Libraries and Community-Based Organizations: Michelle Ochillo, Keith Cogdill, Lalitha Kutty, and Angela Ruffin, National Network of Libraries of Medicine, National Network Office, National Library of Medicine, Washington, DC.

Bioinformatics Education and Information Services in an Academic Health Sciences Center Library: W. John MacMullen, School of Information and Library Science; Margaret E. Moore; K. T. Vaughan; and Carol G. Jenkins, AHIP, Health Sciences Library; and Bradley M. Hemminger, School of Information and Library Science; University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill.

Testing the Waters: Virtual Tutorials Using Digital Reference Software: Christina Mayberry and Pamela M. Corley, AHIP, Norris Medical Library, University of Southern California–Los Angeles.

Nursing and Allied Health Resources, Leadership and Management, and Technical Services Sections and Mental Health SIG. Contributed Papers Session: Lifeguarding 101: Avoiding or Surviving Wipeout in the Waves of Health Sciences Librarianship

Moderator: Pamela Sherwill, AHIP, Health Sciences Library, University of Florida–Gainesville.

Surviving Wipeout: Planning for a Three Library Merger: Sylvia Contreras, Health Sciences Libraries, University of Wisconsin–Madison.

Surviving Technology's Tsunami: A New Approach to Library Planning: Wallace McLendon, Health Sciences Library, University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill.

Everything That Rises Must Converge: Merging Service Points, Raising the Bar of Expectations for Information Services: Gerald J. Perry, AHIP, Javad Basij, Susan Keiser, Nga Nguyen, David Piper, AHIP, Joan Schlimgen, and Stefan Walz, Arizona Health Sciences Library, University of Arizona–Tucson.

For Fee to For Free: Navigating the Rough Seas of Document Delivery: Barbara M. Koehler and Holly A. Harden, Welch Medical Library, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland.

Medical Library Middle Managers: Perceived Challenges and Opportunities: Melissa S. De Santis, AHIP, and Tania Bardyn, Library, University of Texas Health Science Center–San Antonio.

Technical Services, Collection Development, and Nursing and Allied Health Resources Sections. Contributed Papers Session: Swimming in the Sea of Electronic Resources: Meeting the Challenges #2

Moderator: Martin J. Brennan, Library of the Health Sciences, University of Illinois–Chicago.

Patterns of Use of Electronic Journals: Judith L. Wulff and Neal D. Nixon, Kornhauser Health Sciences Library, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky.

A Star to Guide Us By … Web-Based Tools to Navigate the Electronic Seas: Daniel Dollar, Cushing/Whitney Medical Library, and Kimberly Parker, Yale University Library, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut.

Seining the 'Net: Electronic Use Statistics That Didn't Get Away: Spencer S. Marsh and Andrew White, Health Science Center Library, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York.

The LinkOut Chronicles: Growth as an Indicator of LinkOut's Impact on the Library World: Greg Pratt, AHIP, and Wes Browning, Research Medical Library, M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas.

The Complex Information Environment: Remote Access Issues and Solutions: Peggy Tahir and Min-Lin Fang, Library and Center for Knowledge Management, University of California–San Francisco.

History of the Health Sciences Section. Contributed Papers and Invited Speakers Session: Diving for Treasure: Library Exhibits from Idea to (Virtual) Reality

Moderator: Patricia Touhy, Exhibition Program, National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, Maryland.

Planning an Exhibit for the Fiftieth Anniversary of the Discovery of the Structure of DNA: Ludmila Pollock, Libraries and Archives, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, New York.

From Realia to Visual Virtuality: Margaret Vugrin, AHIP, and Richard C. Wood, Library; and Hershel Womack and Ed Youngblood, School of Mass Communications; Texas Tech University–Lubbock.

Transforming a Medical Library into a Treasure Island for K–12 Teachers: Jiwon Kim, History of Medicine Division, National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, Maryland.

The Library's Legacy: A Virtual History Room: Rebecca L. Fisher, and Taeyeol Park, Dahlgren Memorial Library, Georgetown University, Washington, DC.

Getting the Most Out of the Virtual Treasures in “Changing the Face of Medicine: Celebrating America's Women Physicians”: Manon Parry, History of Medicine Division, National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, Maryland.

Collection Development, Relevant Issues, and Hospital Libraries Sections and Rehabilitation Hospital SIG. Invited Speakers Session: Navigating the Rapids of Rehabilitation: Reasons and Resources

Moderator: Amy L. Frey, AHIP, Health Sciences Library, Hospital for Special Care, New Britain, Connecticut.

Navigating the Rapids of Rehabilitation: Reasons and Resources: Amy L. Frey, Health Sciences Library, Hospital for Special Care, New Britain, Connecticut; Pat Herndon, Noble Learning Resource Center, Shepherd Center, Atlanta, Georgia; and Robert Mackes, Schering Plough Library of Science and Medicine, Union Hospital, Union, New Jersey.

Health Association Libraries and History of the Health Sciences Sections and African American Medical Libraries Alliance SIG. Invited Speakers Session: Sharing Our Success from Idea to Impact

Moderator: Cassandra R. Allen, Specialized Information Services, National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, Maryland.

NLM's Toxicology Information Outreach Project: From Idea to Impact: Melvin L. Spann, Division of Specialized Information Services, National Library of Medicine, Silver Spring, Maryland.

Environmental Health and Information Outreach Program of the National Library of Medicine: Henry Lewis, College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Science, Florida A&M University–Tallahassee.

Technology in the Louis Stokes Health Science Library: Robert Copeland, Department of Pharmacology, Howard University College of Medicine, Washington, DC.

International Cooperation, Medical Informatics, Collection Development, and Technical Services Sections. Invited Speakers Session: Equitable Access to Essential Information for Health: WHO's HINARI Partnership

Moderator: Amy Butros, AHIP, Biomedical Library, University of California–San Diego, La Jolla.

Equitable Access to Essential Information for Health: WHO's HINARI Partnership: Barbara Aronson, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland; Maurice Long, BMJ Publishing Group, London, United Kingdom; Obianuju Mollel, J. W. Scott Health Sciences Library, Walter C. Mackenzie Health Sciences Center, University of Alberta–Edmonton, Canada; Kimberly Parker, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut; Walter Omona, Veterinary Sciences Library, Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda; and Leo Voogt, Elsevier Science, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Medical Informatics Section, Leadership and Management, Medical Library Education, and Technical Services Sections and Molecular Biology and Genomics SIG. Invited Speakers Session: Surf Report: Forecasting Technology Trends

Moderator: Jean Sayre, AHIP, Hardin Library for the Health Sciences, University of Iowa–Iowa City.

Genomic Tsunamis and the Future of Health Care: Daniel R. Masys, FACP, Biomedical Informatics, School of Medicine, University of California–San Diego.

Digital Information: That's Usable, Not Just Useful: Cherri Pancake, Computer Science, Oregon State University–Corvallis.

On the Importance of Being Open: Scott Garrison, Health Services Library, University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill.

Veterinary Medical Libraries Section. Invited Speakers Session: Critters Riding the Crest: Exotic Animal Practice

Moderator: Linda Coates, Library Services, Zoological Society of San Diego, San Diego, California.

The Role of Pathology in Wildlife Conservation: Bruce Rideout, Center for Reproduction of Endangered Species, Zoological Society of San Diego, San Diego, California.

Giant Panda Nutrition: Mark Edwards, Nutrition, Zoological Society of San Diego, San Diego, California.

Open-Heart Surgery to Repair a Cardiac Defect in a Sumatran Orangutan: Meg Sutherland-Smith, Veterinary Services—Zoo, Zoological Society of San Diego, San Diego, California.

Developing a West Nile Virus Protocol: Tracy Clippinger, Veterinary Services, Zoo, Zoological Society of San Diego, San Diego, California.

Anesthesia in Zoo and Wildlife Medicine: Jeff Zuba, Veterinary Services, Wild Animal Park, Zoological Society of San Diego, Escondido, California.

POSTER PRESENTATIONS

Poster presentations were scheduled on two separate days of the annual meeting. The even numbered posters were on Sunday, May 4, 2003, 2:30 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. The odd numbered posters were on Monday, May 5, 2003, 2:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.

(1) Integrated but Separate: An Integrative Medicine Program and a Health Sciences Library in Partnership: Catherine L. Wolfson, AHIP, and Mary Holcomb, Arizona Health Sciences Library; and Laurie Soloff, Program in Integrative Medicine; University of Arizona–Tucson.

(2) In Support of Working Companion Animals: Identifying and Locating Information: Mary W. Wood and Lynette A. Hart, University of California Center for Animal Alternatives, University of California–Davis.

(3) A Twenty-Five-Year Trend Analysis of Academic Health Sciences Library Collections, Expenditures, Personnel, and Resources Use. Gary D. Byrd, AHIP, Health Sciences Library, University at Buffalo (SUNY), Buffalo, New York, and James Shedlock, AHIP, Galter Health Sciences Library, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois.

(4) Challenges and Opportunities Facing a Clinical Medical Librarian Program in an Academic Setting: A Case Study: Peggy Mullaly-Quijas, AHIP, Health Sciences Libraries, Health Sciences Library, University of Missouri–Kansas City.

(5) The New AAHSL Assessment Program: Implementing the LibQUAL+ Survey in Academic Health Sciences Libraries: James Shedlock, AHIP, Galter Health Sciences Library, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois; Tamera Lee, Greenblatt Library, Medical College of Georgia–Augusta; and Rick Forsman, AHIP, Denison Memorial Library, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center–Denver.

(6) A New Fish in the Sea: A Clinical Librarian in a Pediatrics Department: Sarah Towner Wright, Health Sciences Library/Pediatrics Department; and Linda J. Collins, AHIP, and Julia Shaw-Kokot, AHIP, Health Sciences Library; University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill.

(7) Tidal Wave of Titles in a Sea of Humanity: Anna K. O'Malley, Scott T. McEwen, and Deborah A. Ruck, Medical College of Wisconsin Libraries, Medical College of Wisconsin–Milwaukee.

(8) Tracking Usage of Non-Circulating Print Journals in the Electronic Age: Barbara C. Ingrassia, AHIP, The Lamar Soutter Library, University of Massachusetts Medical School–Worcester.

(9) Catching the Right Wave at the Right Time: Building a Cancer Library: Barbara J. Henry, AHIP, Cancer Resource Library, and Christine Chastain-Warheit, AHIP, Medical Libraries of Christiana Care, Christiana Care Health System, Newark, Delaware.

(10) Adopt~a~Book: Leave Your Imprint on the Library: Colleen M. Weum; Nanette J. Welton; and Angela Lee, Social Work Library; Health Sciences Libraries, University of Washington–Seattle.

(11) Establishing Priorities in Selection of Electronic Journals: Dawn Swalboski and Patricia J. Erwin, Plummer Library, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota.

(12) Information for the Cure: Josephine L. Dorsch, AHIP, Karen M. Heskett, and Peg Burnette, Library of the Health Sciences–Peoria, University of Illinois–Chicago, Peoria.

(13) The Evolving Reference Collection: Examining Turbulent Waters: Kathleen A. McGraw, Diane McKenzie, AHIP, and Barrie Hayes, Health Sciences Library, University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill.

(14) Getting Hit by a Wave of Journals: Evaluating a Journal Collection: Shirley A. Tanase and Hella Bluhm-Stieber, AHIP, Medical Library, Santa Clara Valley Health and Hospital System, San Jose, California.

(15) Using Knowledge Management to Meet Collection Development Challenges: Tao You, Margaret (Peggy) W. Westlake, Gayle Grantham, and Nunzia B. Giuse, AHIP, Eskind Biomedical Library, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee.

(16) E-Acquisitions: A Comparison of Electronic Collection Management Tools for Libraries: Virginia F. Bender, AHIP, Health Sciences Library, West Virginia University–Morgantown.

(17) MEDLINEplus Goes Local to Health Services: Mapping Local Health Terms to MEDLINEplus: Christie Silbajoris, Brian Hilligoss, and Diana McDuffee, Health Sciences Library, University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill.

(18) High Schools, MEDLINEplus, and PubMed: Using Students as Peer Tutors: Debra Warner, AHIP, Regional Academic Health Center Library, University of Texas Health Science Center–San Antonio, Harlingen; Lucy Hansen, Library, South Texas High School for Health Professions–Mercedes; and Cynthia Olney, Academic Informatics Services, and Virginia M. Bowden, AHIP, Library, University of Texas Health Science Center–San Antonio.

(19) Computer Health Literacy for Seniors in Northern Idaho: Elizabeth K. Hill, AHIP, and Marcia Horner, William T. Wood Medical Library, Kootenai Medical Center, Coeur d'Alene, Idaho.

(20) Communicating Consumer Health Information across Cultures: Community-Designed Pages and Information Technology Applications: Ellen H. Howard, K. K. Sherwood Library, Health Sciences Library, University of Washington–Seattle.

(21) MEDLINEplus en Español: Testing the Waters: Debra G. Warner, AHIP, and Graciela Reyna, Medical Library, Regional Academic Health Center, University of Texas Health Science Center–San Antonio, Harlingen; Evelyn R. Olivier, Library, University of Texas Health Science Center–San Antonio; Andrew Lombardo, Medical Library, Regional Academic Health Center, University of Texas Health Science Center–San Antonio, Harlingen; and Mary Jo Dwyer and Virginia M. Bowden, AHIP, Library, University of Texas Health Science Center–San Antonio.

(22) Poster withdrawn.

(23) HICUP for Good Health: Partnering to Link Consumer Health Information in Chinese to Physicians, Patients, and the Public: Gail Y. Hendler, AHIP, and Paul Wrynn, Ehrman Medical Library, New York University School of Medicine–New York.

(24) The Role of the Librarian in the Creation of Low-Literacy, Patient-Education Handouts: Helen G. Mayo, University of Texas Southwestern Library, and Shirin Pestonjee, Department of Nursing Education, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center–Dallas.

(25) Haz-Map: Occupational Health Information for the Public: Hua F. Chang; Stacey J. Arnesen, Special Projects; Jay A. Brown; Vera Hudson; Gale A. Dutcher, Office of Outreach; George F. Hazard; Phillip Thomas; and Hannah Tang, Specialized Information Services Division; National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, Maryland.

(26) Catching the Community Outreach Wave: A Women's Health Network Navigates Multicultural Communities toward Quality Health Information: Jean P. Shipman, Catharine Canevari, and Coleman E. Rose, Tompkins-McCaw Library for the Health Sciences, Virginia Commonwealth University Libraries; JoAnne K. Henry, RN, School of Nursing; Denise C. Daly, Department of Internal Medicine; and Barbara A. Wright, Virginia Commonwealth University Libraries; Virginia Commonwealth University–Richmond.

(27) Instruccion de la Salud para las Familias: Health Literacy for Families: Jeffrey T. Huber, School of Library and Information Studies, Texas Woman's University–Houston; Elaine S. Plotkin, Harris County Public Library, Houston, Texas; Beatriz Varman, Library, Houston Academy of Medicine-Texas Medical Center, Houston; Rudy Ford, Luis Sabido, and Carol Lee, Harris County Public Library, Houston, Texas; and Richard Jasper and Felicia Little, Library, Houston Academy of Medicine-Texas Medical Center, Houston.

(28) Tiered Virtual Reference Assistance for Consumer Health Questions: Lisa A. Oberg, Health Sciences Libraries, University of Washington–Seattle.

(29) Promoting Health Information Literacy at a University Student Health Service: Mary Linn Bergstrom, Biomedical Library; Brad P. Buchman, Student Health Service; Lupe Samaniego-Kraus, Student Health Service; and Jeffrey Williams, Biomedical Library; University of California–San Diego, La Jolla.

(30) Outreach Librarians Make Waves: Delivering Consumer Health Information in Rural and Urban Communities: Mary V. Fielder, AHIP, Three Rivers Area Health Education Center, Columbus, Georgia; Lisa Smith, Magnolia Coastlands Area Health Education Center, Statesboro, Georgia; and Susan Poorbaugh, Area Health Education Center Learning Resources Center, Georgia Statewide Area Health Education Center–Augusta.

(31) Arizona Public Health Information System (APHIS): Bringing Together Public and Health Information to Protect the Health of Arizonans: Michael Kronenfeld, AHIP, Learning Resource Center, Arizona School of Health Sciences–Mesa; and Jeanette C. McCray, AHIP, and Patricia A. Auflick, Arizona Health Sciences Library, University of Arizona–Tucson.

(32) Partnering for Enhanced Patient Education: Michele S. Klein-Fedyshin, AHIP, Library Services; Michelle L. Burda, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center—Shadyside, Health Sciences Library System; and Barbara L. Lawrence, RN, Nursing Education and Research, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center—Shadyside; University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

(33) Hanging Ten with Public Libraries: Health Information Services to the State: Molly A. Youngkin and Claire Hamasu, National Network of Libraries of Medicine, MidContinental Region, Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library, University of Utah–Salt Lake City.

(34) Bilingual Health Information Access for an Urban Minority Community: Nancy Allee, Public Health Information Services and Access; Anthony Aguirre, Health Sciences Libraries, Taubman Medical Library; Theresa Arndt, Outreach Services; Nancy Pulsipher, Public Health Information Services and Access; Patricia L. Bradley, Public Health Information Services and Access; and Shelley Coe, School of Public Health; University of Michigan–Ann Arbor.

(35) Education for Inpatients: Working with Nurses through the Clinical Information System: Nancy Calabretta, Susan K. Cavanaugh, and Barbara J. Miller, Sharp Health Science Library, The Cooper Health System, Camden, New Jersey.

(36) Parents Learn to Find Quality Health Information on the Internet: Nancy E. Harger, AHIP, Lamar Soutter Library, University of Massachusetts Medical School–Worcester.

(37) Health Information for Consumers: A Study of Selected Hospital and Library Websites in the South Central Region: Pauline Fulda, AHIP, and Hanna Kwasik, AHIP, John P. Isché Library, Louisiana State University Health Sciences–New Orleans.

(38) Bridging the Digital Divide: Valerie A. Gross, Community Health Resource Library, and Britain G. Roth, AHIP, Academic Information, Geisinger Health System, Danville, Pennsylvania.

(39) Community Assessment and Objective Development in the Texas Lower Rio Grande Valley: Prelude to Outreach: Virginia M. Bowden, AHIP, Library; Cynthia Olney, Educational Research and Development; and Jonquil Feldman, Library, University of Texas Health Science Center–San Antonio; Debra Warner, AHIP, Regional Academic Health Center Library, University of Texas Health Science Center–San Antonio, Harlingen; Catherine Burroughs, Outreach Evaluation Resource Center, Pacific Northwest Regional Medical Library, University of Washington–Seattle; Evelyn R. Olivier, AHIP, Library, University of Texas Health Science Center–San Antonio; and Frederick B. Wood, Office of Health Information Programs Development, National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, Maryland.

(40) MedInfoRus: A Need for the Medical Information in Multicultural Society: Luda Dolinsky, AHIP, Medical Library, Lutheran Medical Center, Brooklyn, New York; Yelena Friedman, AHIP, Medical Library, Staten Island University Hospital, Staten Island, New York; and Rimma Perelman, Medical Library Services, St. Vincent's Hospital and Medical Center, New York.

(41) Copyright in a Sea of Technology, Legislation, Interpretation, and Guidelines: Jim F. Comes, Lamar Soutter Medical Library, University of Massachusetts–Worcester.

(42) Digital Histology: Planning and Implementation of a Digital Image Collection for Use as a Faculty Teaching Resource: Brenda Seago, AHIP, Computer Based Instruction Lab; Susan Deihl, Media Production Services; John Bigbee, Department of Anatomy; Alice Pakurar, Department of Anatomy; Chris Stephens, Educational Applications Development, Faculty and Instructional Development; Jeanne Schlesinger, Instructional Development, Faculty and Instructional Development; and Carol Hampton, Faculty and Instructional Development; Medical College of Virginia Campus of Virginia Commonwealth University–Richmond.

(43) Catch the Nostalgic Wave: Health Sciences Advertisements from the Fab ‘Fifties: Sharon C. Murphy, RN, AHIP, Health Sciences Library, State University of New York–Buffalo.

(44) Guaranteeing Access to a Unique Resource: Publishing a Brain Atlas in a Nontraditional Format: Suzanne S. Stensaas, Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library; Larry J. Stensaas, Physiology; and Derek Cowan and Jeremy M. Smith, Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library; University of Utah–Salt Lake City.

(45) Electronic Library Project for a Government Research Laboratory: Emily M. Moser, Epidemiology and Medical Studies Program, RTI International, Rockville, Maryland, and Todd Hardin, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Rockville, Maryland.

(46) Interactive Web Resource for Authors; Shaping the Publication and Use of Intellectual Property: Kathleen B. Oliver, Brian Brown, and Caroline Zambrowicz, Welch Medical Library, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland.

(47) CIRRIE Database of Rehabilitation Research: Marcia E. Daumen, Center for International Rehabilitation Research Information and Exchange, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York.

(48) Surf's Up and So Are the Fences! Providing Access to Health Sciences Information from Inside an Olympic Security Zone: Mary E. Youngkin, John Bramble, and Jeanne M. Le Ber; Eccles Health Sciences Library, University of Utah–Salt Lake City.

(49) Creation of a Web-Accessible Combined Print and Electronic Journal Holdings List: Chris Ewing and David Morse, AHIP, Norris Medical Library, University of Southern California–Los Angeles.

(50) Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries (AAHSL): Academic Health Sciences Libraries Enhancing Excellence in Medical Education since 1977: Susan Jacobson, AHIP, Library of the Health Sciences, University of Illinois–Chicago; Diana J. Cunningham, AHIP, Medical Sciences Library, New York Medical College–Valhalla; Susan Starr, Biomedical Library, University of California–San Diego, La Jolla; and Laurie L. Thompson, AHIP, Health Sciences Library, State University of New York Upstate Medical University–Syracuse.

(51) Online Journals' Impact on the Citation Patterns of Medical Faculty: Sandra L. De Groote, Library of the Health Sciences, University of Illinois–Chicago; Mary Shultz, Library of the Health Sciences, University of Illinois–Chicago, Urbana; and Marci Doranski, Library of the Health Sciences, University of Illinois–Chicago.

(52) Finding the Next Wave in Evidence-Based Medicine: Andrea B. Markinson, Medical Research Library of Brooklyn, State University of New York Downstate Medical Center–Brooklyn.

(53) Being One with the Current: Integrating Informatics and Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) into the Curriculum: Andrea L. Ball, Health Sciences Libraries, and Perri A. Morgan, PA-C, Physician Assistant Program, University of Wisconsin–Madison.

(54) Evaluation of Evidence-Based Medicine Search Skills in the Clinical Years: Anne M. Linton, AHIP, Patricia H. Wilson, and Alexandra W. Gomes, Himmelfarb Health Sciences Library, The George Washington University, Washington, DC.

(55) Over the Chasm: Extreme Evidence-Based Medicine: Eric Albright, AHIP, Kate Kelly, AHIP, Amy Lapidow, Amy LaVertu, Eileen C. Moyer, Anne Nou, and Elizabeth J. Richardson, Health Sciences Library, Tufts University, Boston, Massachusettes.

(56) Evidence-Based Resources for a Public Health Project: Hatheway Simpson and Elaine R. Martin, Lamar Soutter Library; and Roger Luckmann, Family Medicine and Community Health; University of Massachusetts Medical School–Worcester; and Sharon Telleen, Department of Sociology, University of Illinois–Chicago.

(57) Crew Members Working Together to Keep the Evidence Afloat: Jill B. Mayer, AHIP, North Carolina Area Health Education Center (NC AHEC) Library and Information Service Network, Health Sciences Library, University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill; Connie Schardt, AHIP, Medical Center Library, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina; Janine Tillett, Carpenter Library, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, North Carolina; Sue Stigleman and Linda Turner, Health Sciences Library, Mountain Area Health Education Center, Asheville, North Carolina; and Karen Crowell, AHIP, and Robert Ladd, Health Sciences Library, University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill.

(58) Show Me the Evidence: Heading for Better Outcomes: Julie L. Richardson, AHIP, and Nancy Stine, Northwest Area Health Education Center, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Salisbury, North Carolina.

(59) Diving for Treasurers in the Evidence-Based Liberature Sea and Finding the Jewels by Using Filters: Karl Woodworth, Grady Branch, and Linda G. Markwell, AHIP, Branch Library Services, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia.

(60) Finding the Best Evidence When You're on a Tight Schedule: Teaching Medical Students to Quickly Locate Published Systematic Reviews and Randomized Controlled Trials: Keir T. Reavie, Library and Center for Knowledge Management; George F. Sawaya, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, School of Medicine; Gail Persily, Informatics Education and Center for Instructional Technology; David Owen, Basic Sciences; and Min-Lin Fang; Library and Center for Knowledge Management; Cynthia Fenton, Department of Medicine, School of Medicine; and Kaveh G. Shojania, Department of Medicine, School of Medicine; University of California–San Francisco.

(61) Training for Family Practice Residents Seeking Evidence-Based Clinical Information: A Pilot Study: Margaret A. Spinner, Lamar Soutter Library, University of Massachusetts Medical School–Worcester.

(62) Assisting the Oncology Advanced Practice Nurse (APN) in Fostering Evidence-Based Practice: The Role of the Librarian: Mark Vrabel, AHIP, Oncology Nursing Society Library, Oncology Nursing Society, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

(63) Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) Resources: A Toolkit: Sandra A. Kendall, and Kellee Kaulback, Sidney Liswood Library, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontorio, Canada.

(64) Literature Search for Making a Clinical Guideline for Cataracts in Japan: Shinichi Abe, and Tomoko Yamada, Medical Information Center, Jikei University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.

(65) Cooperative Knowledge Management within Health Sciences Associations: The Role of Librarians: David A. Sweet, Library, American Health Information Management Association, Chicago, Illinois, and Lynn Dunikowski, Canadian Library of Family Services, University of Western Ontario–London, Canada.

(66) Load up the Woody: Portable Classroom Leads to Partnership: Jeanne M. Le Ber, Nancy T. Lombardo, and John Bramble, Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library, University of Utah–Salt Lake City.

(67) The Role of the Resource Center in Advocating for Quality Health Care: Mary A. Hyde, AHIP, and Pamela Van Hine, AHIP, Resource Center, American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, Washington, DC; and Jeanette Harlow, AHIP, Resource Center, American Hospital Association, Chicago, Illinois.

(68) Utilization of Information Resources by Tennessee's Occupational and Physical Therapists: Priscilla L. Stephenson, AHIP, and Susan A. Selig, Health Sciences Library; and Ruth D. Mulvany, PT, Department of Physical Therapy, College of Allied Health Sciences, University of Tennessee Health Science Center–Memphis; Kristin Robbins, PT, OTR, Rehabilitation Services, Baptist Memorial Hospital, Collierville, Tennessee; and Ann H. Nolen, Department of Occupational Therapy, College of Allied Health Sciences, University of Tennessee Health Science Center–Memphis.

(69) Using the Ebb and Flow of Consumer Information Delivery in a Health Association Environment to Affect Resource Center Positioning within the Organization: Patricia E. Pinkowski, AHIP, Green-Field Library, Alzheimer's Association, Chicago, Illinois.

(70) Informationist Buzz: Significant Published and Spoken Words of a Cutting Edge Concept: helen-ann brown, Weill Cornell Medical Library, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York.

(71) Preserving the Past for the Future: The Pediatric History Center of the American Academy of Pediatrics: Susan B. Marshall, Division of Library and Archival Services, American Academy of Pediatrics, Elk Grove Village, Illinois.

(72) Selecting Software for Journal Article Delivery from the Library to the Desktop: David S. Brown, Mayo Foundation Libraries, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota; Ann M. Farrell, Bursak Biomedical Library, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Florida; and Karen E. Larsen, Dawn Littleton, AHIP, and Larry Prokop, Mayo Foundation Libraries, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota.

(73) Stuck in the Mud? Re-Thinking Interlibrary Loan and Document Delivery: Ammon S. Ripple, Health Sciences Library System, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

(74) Improving Document Delivery Service to National Network of Libraries of Medicine Network Members: A Regional Medical Library “Wipes Out” Its Low Fill Rate: Beverly A. Gresehover, Christian J. Miller, Vickie M. Gray, and Meg Del Baglivo, University of Maryland Health Sciences and Human Services Library, and Beth Wescott, National Network of Libraries of Medicine Southeastern/Atlantic Region; University of Maryland–Baltimore.

(75) Open Two Ports—Ariel Coming Through!: Jan T. Orick, AHIP, Biomedical Library; Deborah Brackstone, Biomedical Library; and Jeffrey Laughter, Information Technology Systems; St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee.

(76) Comparison of Delivery Options for Interlibrary Loan Requests in a Hospital Setting: Karen L. Roth, AHIP, Medical Library, Morton Plant Mease Health Care, Clearwater, Florida, and Thomas W. Hill, Medical Library, Self Regional Healthcare, Greenwood, South Carolina.

(77) University at Buffalo/Roswell Park Cancer Institute Document Delivery Project: Ophelia Morey, University at Buffalo Health Sciences Library, Buffalo, New York.

(78) Order by Number: Developing an Automatic Citation Retrieval Feature for a Web-Based Document Request Form: Paul Worona, Ammon S. Ripple, and Jody A. Wozar, Health Sciences Library System, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

(79) PLUS Information Services: Fee-Based Services for Non-Affiliated Clients: Penny Coppernoll-Blach, AHIP, and Barbara Slater, AHIP, Biomedical Library, University of California–San Diego, La Jolla.

(80) The Current Gains Strength: Evolution of a Multidimensional Nursing Liaison Program: Anne D. Powers, AHIP, and Patricia L. Thibodeau, AHIP, Medical Center Library, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina.

(81) Going Mobile: Laptop Lending in an Academic Medical Library: Jon Crossno, Sharon Giles, and Nathan Hooper, Library, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center–Dallas.

(82) The Multifaceted Role of a Library Nursing Liaison: Carolyn M. Brown, AHIP, Health Sciences Center Library, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia.

(83) eBay Sellers' Opinions about “Librarian” Clothes: Frumpy or Bumpy?: Sunny L. Worel, R. N. Barr Library, Minnesota Department of Health–Minneapolis, and Allan R. Barclay, Health Sciences Libraries, University of Wisconsin–Madison.

(84) Collaborative Development of a Web Knowledgebase for a Liaison Program: Holly A. Harden, Kathleen B. Oliver, Tina M. Otter, and Ming Zhu, Welch Medical Library, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland.

(85) CDC Information Center: Building a Collaborative Learning Space in the New CDC Global Communications and Training Facility: Jocelyn A. Rankin, AHIP, and Karen H. Dahlen, AHIP, Information Center, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Michael S. Tarr, AIA, Facilities Planning and Project Management Office; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia; and Shirley Dugdale, AIA, Learning Environments, DEGW-North America, Evanston, Illinois.

(86) A Library-Based Laboratory for Bioinformatics Support: Stephen Cammer, University of California–San Diego Libraries and Graduate Program in Bioinformatics; and Susan Starr, University of California–San Diego Biomedical Library, and University of California–San Diego Libraries, University of California–San Diego, La Jolla.

(87) From Rags to Riches: Rebuilding a Library Found in Ruins: Catherine A. Marshall, Aveni Medical Library, University Hospital Health System Richmond Heights Hospital, Richmond Heights, Ohio.

(88) Managing a Library Renovation Project: A Team Approach: Deanna M. Lucia and Mary E. Piorun, AHIP, The Lamar Soutter Library, University of Massachusetts Medical School–Worcester.

(89) An “Information Commons” in a Hospital Library: Mary K. Joyce, AHIP, and Rekha Gandhi, Shinn-Lathrope Health Science Library, Morristown Memorial Hospital, Morristown, New Jersey.

(90) Using Flashlight Online to Shine a Light on Instructional Assessment: Barbara F. Schloman, AHIP, Library Information Services, Libraries and Media Services, Kent State University, Kent, Ohio.

(91) CD: Wave of the Future: Dennis A. Pernotto, IAIMS; Dixie A. Jones, AHIP; Kay M. Gammill; and Donna F. Timm; Medical Library, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center–Shreveport.

(92) Puddle Jumping: Making a Splash with Instruction at Outlying University Clinics: Heidi C. Marleau, Health Sciences Libraries, University of Wisconsin–Madison.

(93) Does Our Web Page Work: Combining Usability Testing with Student Orientation: Karen C. Lippert, Library, Oregon Health & Science University–Portland.

(94) Breaking Down Barriers: Reaching Out to Surgery Residents: Mark Berendsen and Linda O'Dwyer, Galter Health Sciences Library, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois.

(95) Testing Search Skills in a Real-Time, Case-Based Setting: Patricia Wilson, Anne Linton, and Alexandra Gomes, Himmelfarb Health Sciences Library, The George Washington University, Washington, DC.

(96) Creation of a Model Education Plan for an Academic Health Sciences Library: Shawn F. Manning and Marie T. Ascher, Medical Sciences Library, New York Medical College–Valhalla.

(97) Collaborating with Faculty: Integrating the Library into the Medical School Curriculum: Stephanie Kerns, Galter Health Sciences Library, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois.

(98) Millennials in Action: A Student-Guided Effort in Curriculum Integration of Library Skills: Stewart M. Brower, Health Sciences Library, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York.

(99) Web-Based News Application Facilitates Marketing of Library Services: Brian Brown, Kathleen Oliver, and Caroline Zambrowicz, Welch Medical Library, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland.

(100) Healing the Soul with Artwork: Catherine M. Boss, AHIP, and Darlene Robertelli, Booker Health Sciences Library, Jersey Shore Medical Center, Meridian Health System, Neptune, New Jersey.

(101) Turning the Tide: The Rejuvenation and Development of a Library Newsletter: Erika L. Sevetson, Middleton Health Sciences Library, and Michael Venner, Weston Clinical Science Center Library, University of Wisconsin–Madison.

(102) Onsite or Online: Promote Your Library with Floorplans: Greg Pratt, AHIP, Research Medical Library, M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas.

(103) Launching a Flagship Library: In an Ocean of Information, Making Sure Your Library Stands Out: Gretchen N. Arnold, AHIP, Elaine M. Attridge, AHIP, Patricia Vaughn, and Bart Ragon, Claude Moore Health Sciences Library, University of Virginia Health Sciences Library–Charlottesville.

(104) Theme of the Month Marketing: Herldine M. Radley, Therona Ramos, and Sharon Giles, Library, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center–Dallas.

(105) Common Grounds: Lessons Learned from Installing a Coffee Service to Increase Library Usage and Generate Funding: Jean P. Shipman, Catharine S. Canevari, and Ramona H. Thiss, Tompkins-McCaw Library for the Health Sciences, Virginia Commonwealth Univeristy Libraries, Virginia Commonwealth University–Richmond.

(106) Riding the Wave to Powerful Poster Presentations: Jeanne M. Le Ber and Susan Roberts, Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library, University of Utah–Salt Lake City.

(107) Electronic Bookplates: Finding New Ways to Acknowledge Benefactors and Solicit Future Support: Linda O'Dwyer, Ron Sims, and James Shedlock, AHIP, Galter Health Sciences Library, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois.

(108) Facilitating Metatagging of Rich Media Learning Objects by Faculty: Juliane Schneider, Ehrman Medical Library; and Jacqueline Spiegel-Cohen, Eunbong Sohn, and Martin Nachbar, Advanced Educational Systems; New York University School of Medicine–New York.

(109) Building an International Multimedia Digital Library: Sharon E. Dennis, Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library, University of Utah–Salt Lake City, and Sebastian Uijtdehaage, Chris Candler, and Sandra McIntyre, HEAL Project, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California–Los Angeles.

(110) Metrics: A Move in the Right Direction: Betsy Moore, and Eileen Stanley, AHIP, Library Services; and Donna P. Johnson, AHIP, Library and Media Services (retired), Library Services, Allina Hospitals & Clinics, Minneapolis, Minnesota.

(111) Tool of Choice for a Web-Based Online Library Course: Blackboard Software: Rama Vishwanatham, AHIP, Rowland Medical Library, University of Mississippi Medical Center–Jackson.

(112) Surviving a Budget Tsunami: Beverly Murphy, AHIP, Richard A. Peterson, AHIP, Sarah Wardell, and Patricia L. Thibodeau, AHIP, Duke University Medical Center Library, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina.

(113) Service Beyond Our Borders: Ellen N. Sayed, AHIP, and Thomas L. Williams, AHIP, Charles M. Baugh Biomedical Library, University of South Alabama–Mobile.

(114) Project Management: Establishing and Implementing an Information Network in Rural South Alabama: Jie Li, AHIP, Judy F. Burnham, AHIP, Ellen N. Sayed, AHIP, Thomas L. Williams, AHIP, Fletch L. Bowling, and Robert R. Runderson, Biomedical Library, University of South Alabama–Mobile.

(115) AIDS Information Access for Northwest Ohio: A Community-Based HIV/AIDS Information Network: Jonathan Hartmann, Raymon H. Mulford Library, Medical College of Ohio–Toledo.

(116) Riding the Wave to Rural Texas: Librarians Support Year Three Medical Students at Remote Sites with Electronic Resources and Digital Communication Tools: Linda N. King, AHIP, and Daniel E. Burgard, AHIP, Gibson D. Lewis Health Science Library, University of North Texas Health Science Center–Fort Worth.

(117) Partnering for a Healthier Community: Nancy C. McKeehan, Libraries for Systems, and Janice C. May, Hands on Health-South Carolina, Medical University of South Carolina Library; and Thomas G. Basler, Libraries and Learning Resources Center, Department of Library Science and Informatics; Medical University of South Carolina–Charleston.

(118) Building Castles in the Shifting Sands of Health Information: Developing an Information Portal for Cardiovascular Resources for Florida's Health Professionals: Linda C. Butson, Health Science Center Libraries, University of Florida–Gainesville; Sharon Schmidt, Central Florida Area Health Education Center, Nova Southeastern University Area Health Education Center Program, Apopka, Florida; and Debbie Hawkins, North Florida Area Health Education Center Program, University of Florida–Gainesville.

(119) Planning Project LINK: A Textbook Case: Mary C. Congleton, AHIP, Health Sciences Library, Southern Kentucky Area Health Education Center (AHEC)/University of Kentucky Medical Center Library–Berea.

(120) Establishing the Utility of Access to a Personal Digital Assistant (PDA) Version of PubMed in a Clinical Setting: The Role of the Librarian-to-Researcher Collaboration in the Development and Evaluation Process: Catharine S. Canevari, Tompkins-McCaw Library for the Health Sciences, Virginia Commonwealth University–Richmond; Paul Fontelo, Office of High Performance Computing and Communications, National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, Maryland; and Bradley W. Otterson, NIH Library, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland.

(121) Caught Reading on the Job: Professional Reading Habits of Academic Health Sciences Reference Librarians: Christopher Hooper-Lane, Erika L. Sevetson, and Heidi C. Marleau, Health Sciences Libraries, University of Wisconsin–Madison.

(122) Information Resource Needs Assessment from a Personal Digital Assistant (PDA) Survey: Holly A. Harden, Welch Medical Library, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland.

(123) The Netinformation Project: Promoting Regional Networking of Welfare in Eastern Finland: Liisa K. Salmi, Tuulevi Ovaska, and Jorma Komulainen, Library, Kuopio University, Kuopio, Finland.

(124) A Website for Evaluating and Integrating Web-Based Personal Digital Assistant (PDA) Resources for Faculty, Researchers, Students, and Health Care Providers: Wendy Wu and Sandra Martin, AHIP, Shiffman Library, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan.

(125) Quality Information at the Desktop: Tracking the Effects of 24/7 Access to Online Resources at an Academic Medical Center Library: Ann M. Farrell, Bursak Biomedical Library, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Florida; Kay Wellik, AHIP, Library Services, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, Arizona; and Patricia Erwin, Plummer Library, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota.

(126) How We See the Wave: Helping the Visually Impaired Use Library Public Computers and Services: Scott Garrison, Jennifer Curasi, Kevin Lanning, Pedro Chavez, Monecia Samuel, and Barbara Riverdahl, Health Sciences Library, University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill.

(127) Transitions: Challenged to Change: Librarians on the Move—from Public and Hospital to an Academic Health Sciences Library: Rae Jesano, Pamela J. Sherwill-Navarro, AHIP, and 'Nita Ferree, Health Science Center Libraries, University of Florida–Gainesville.

(128) Customer Service with a Virtual Representative: Adam Glazer, Terry Ahmed, and Mary Moore, Reference and Customer Services Section, National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland.

(129) Dude! Don't Wear a “Suit”—Telecommute!: Carolyn C. Willard, AHIP, and Mary Moore, Reference and Customer Services Section, National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, Maryland.

(130) “Rounding Out” Our Services: Librarians Attending Grand Rounds, Expanding the Scope of Information Services at the Arizona Health Sciences Library: Hannah Fisher, AHIP, Fred Heidenreich, AHIP, David Howse, Nga Nguyen, Gerald Perry, AHIP, Mary Riordan, AHIP, and Catherine Wolfson, AHIP, Arizona Health Sciences Library, University of Arizona–Tucson.

(131) Assessing Reference Staff Competency in the Electronic Environment: Kurt I. Munson and Linda J. Walton, Galter Health Sciences Library, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois.

(132) Asked and Answered—Online: How Two Academic Medical Libraries Are Using OCLC's QuestionPoint to Answer Reference Questions: Marie T. Ascher, AHIP, and Haldor Lougee-Heimer, Medical Sciences Library, New York Medical College–Valhalla; and Susanne Markgren and Suzanne J. Crow, Levy Library, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York.

(133) Taking the Library to the People: Designing and Marketing Population-Based Reference and Instruction Services: Nancy H. Tannery and Ammon S. Ripple, Health Sciences Library System, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

(134) The Changing Face of Reference: Tina M. Otter, Welch Medical Library, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland.

(135) Virtual Reference Chat Services' Technology Issues for Teaching Bibliographic Database Searching: Marcia K. Henry and Katherine S. Dabbour, University Library, California State University–Northridge.

(136) Avoiding Mental Health Searching Wipe-Out: A Mental Health Content Filter for MEDLINE: Heather J. Wilder, Department of Psychiatry, Oxford University, Oxford, United Kingdom.

(137) Subject Accessible Electronic Resources: The Cataloging Way!: Nicola J. Cecchino, Chung Sook Kim, Dongming Zhang, and Kathryn Danko, Welch Medical Library, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland.

(138) Analysis of Nuclear Cardiology Literature in MEDLINE: A Study of Gated SPECT Imaging Using PubMed: Nancy Calabretta and Susan K. Cavanaugh, Sharp Health Science Library; and Michael Y. Shen, Nuclear Cardiology Laboratory; The Cooper Health System/Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Camden, New Jersey.

(139) Joining the Dots: A Portal to Bring Together Health Librarians: Alison Turner, MCLIP, National Electronic Library for Health, National Health Service Information Authority, Birmingham, United Kingdom.

(140) Finding Measurement Tools: An Alternative Model for Web Tutorial Design: Angela Lee, Social Work Library, and Janet Schnall, AHIP, Health Sciences Libraries, University of Washington–Seattle.

(141) Online Requests: Toward Expanded Access and Efficient Management: Anne M. Linton, AHIP, Michael Acadia, Natalie Collins, and Alexandra Gomes, Himmelfarb Health Sciences Library, The George Washington University, Washington, DC.

(142) Designing a User-Centered Website: The Whys and Hows of Multiple Usability Testing: Clair Kuykendall, Peggy Tahir, Jean Blackwell, Kirk Hudson, and Gail Persily, Library and Center for Knowledge Management, University of California–San Francisco.

(143) Sampling a Sea of Electronic Resources and Services: Evaluating a Customizable Library Web Portal: Claire Twose, Caroline Zambrowicz, and Dongming Zhang, Welch Medical Library, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland.

(144) Analysis of the National Library of Medicine's Main Website: Online User Survey and Email Evaluation: Cynthia J. Vaughn, Preston Medical Library, University of Tennessee Medical Center–Knoxville, and Susan Fariss, Public Services Division, National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, Maryland.

(145) Integrating Discrete Information Artifacts into a Primary Care Portal: Debra S. Ketchell, AHIP, and Leilani A. St. Anna, AHIP, Health Sciences Libraries; David Kauff and Diane Timberlake, Department of Family Medicine; and Barak Gaster, Department of Medicine; University of Washington–Seattle.

(146) Infoshare Using ERES: An Application of Software Outside of its Intended Use: Ellen H. Howard, K. K. Sherwood Library; Sherry Dodson, Health Sciences Libraries; and Angela Lee, Social Work Library, Health Sciences Library & Information Center; University of Washington–Seattle.

(147) Collaborative Development: Building a Web-Based Family Practice Subject Guide: Helen G. Mayo, University of Texas Southwestern Library; Cassie L. Murphy-Cullen, Family Practice and Community Medicine; Karen Harker, University of Texas Southwestern Library; and Robert D. Frey, Family Practice and Community Medicine; University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center–Dallas.

(148) A Virtual Library Showcase: Blending Technology, Functionality and Human Touch: Jean Blackwell, Min-Lin E. Fang, Leslie Kleinberg, and Julia Kochi, Library and Center for Knowledge Management, University of California–San Francisco.

(149) The Iterative Process in Web Design: A Case Study in Usability Testing: Julia K. Kochi and Gail L. Persily, Library and Center for Knowledge Management, University of California–San Francisco.

(150) Using the Web to Fill Patent Information Requests: A Laptop Poster Session: Kevin O'Brien, Library of the Health Sciences, University of Illinois–Chicago.

(151) Creating an Efficient Content Editor Toolset for a Clinical Web Portal: Leilani A. St. Anna, AHIP, Stanley Florek, and Debra S. Ketchell, Health Sciences Library, University of Washington–Seattle.

(152) The Digital Library as a Lifeboat in the Sea of Licensed Resources: MaryBeth Schell, Health Sciences Library; Diana McDuffee, Area Health Education Center Library and Information Services Network; and Holley Long, Department of Information Technology Services; University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill.

(153) Evaluating the Health SmartLibrary: Steven Hunt, James Shedlock, AHIP, and Linda Walton, Galter Health Sciences Library; and Jon Handler and Michael Gillam, Emergency Medicine Division, Department of Medicine; Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois.

(154) Preventing Information Wipe-Out: Library Resources Via the Intranet: Sue H. Felber, AHIP, and Joan I. Miller, Medical Library, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute, Tampa, Florida.

(155) Evidence-Based Website Design for Bioinformatics Investigators and Students: Wendy Wu, Deborah Charbonneau, and Ellen Marks, Shiffman Library, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan.

OTHER MEETINGS AND EVENTS

Premeeting activities

The MLA Board of Directors held a business and planning meeting throughout the day on Friday, May 2. The Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries held a leadership lunch. The MLA Credentialing Committee met during the evening of May 2.

On Saturday, May 3, the following committees met: the Books Panel; the Nominating Committee; and the 2003, 2004, and 2005 National Program Committees. In addition, the Chapter Council, chapter chairs, Section Council, section chairs, and section program planners held meetings. The Hospital Libraries Section Executive Board held the first of its two sessions scheduled during MLA '03.

MEETING SCHEDULES

Sunday, May 4, 2003

Early Sunday morning, the Jospeh Leiter NLM/MLA Lectureship Committee held its meeting. At the same time, the following sections also held business meetings: Corporate Information Services, Public Services, Relevant Issues, and Research. The Veterinary Medical Libraries Section Executive Board meeting was also scheduled at that time. Informal meetings were held in the late afternoon by the following special interest groups: the African American Medical Librarians Alliance, Complementary and Alternative Medicine, Osteopathic Libraries, Outreach, and Vision Science. Simultaneously, other events were scheduled including the Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries Future Leadership Task Force meeting, the Collection Development Section Board meeting, the Medical Library Group of Southern California and Arizona business meeting, the Southern Chapter of MLA Executive Board meeting, and the Consumer and Patient Health Information Section Communications meeting. Informal meetings that day included “IACUCs: What Is the Librarian's Role,” the marketing library services informal meeting, and the MLA/SLA Quint Chapter meeting steering committee.

Monday, May 5, 2003

The following MLA units or committees met Monday morning: Awards Committee, Governmental Relations Committee, Membership Committee, MLANET Editorial Board, section continuing education chairs, and section treasurers. Other meetings at that time included the Consumer and Patient Health Information Section Executive Committee, the Hospital Libraries Section committee meetings, the Leadership and Management Section Executive Committee meeting, and the Nursing and Allied Health Resources Section Board meeting. MLA sections that also met in the morning included Dental, History of the Health Sciences, Leadership and Management, and Pharmacy and Drug Information. The Fellows of MLA met in the mid-afternoon. Informal meetings were held at the same time by the Public Services Section and the following special interest groups: Assessment and Benchmarking, Clinical Librarians and Evidence-Based Health Care, Department of the Army Medical Command Libraries, Mental Health, Molecular Biology and Genomics, and Voyager Health Sciences. Other meetings held in the mid-afternoon were the Chiropractic Library Consortium Annual Meeting, the JMLA Editorial Board, the New York Online Access to Health (NOAH) Focus Group meeting, the Ovid Customer Forum, Swetswise: Subscriptions and Online Content for Empowered People, and the NLM DOCLINE update. Finally, at the end of the day, the following sections conducted business meetings: Cancer Librarians, Chiropractic Libraries, Hospital Libraries, Nursing and Allied Health Resources, Public Health/Health Administration, and Technical Services. An informal meeting was held in the late afternoon about Institutional Animal Care and Use Committees (IACUC) and the librarian's role.

Tuesday, May 6, 2003

Early morning meetings were scheduled for the following committees and groups: Benchmarking Implementation Task Force and chapter educators, Bylaws Committee, chapter continuing education chairs, Publications Committee, Educational Media and Technologies Section, Health Association Libraries Section, Medical Library Education Section, and Technical Services Section. Informal afternoon meetings were conducted by the following special interest groups: the Department of the Veterans Affairs Librarians; the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgendered Health Sciences Librarians; and Problem-Based Learning. Other groups that held meetings at the same time included the CyberTools for Libraries Users Group, the Electronic Fund Transfer System (EFTS) Users Group, the Northern California and Nevada Medical Library Group business meeting, the PubMed LinkOut support meeting, and the QuickDOC Users Group meeting. Late afternoon business meetings were scheduled for the following sections: Collection Development, Consumer and Patient Health Information, Federal Libraries, International Cooperation, Medical Informatics, and Veterinary Medical Libraries. The Rehabilitation Hospital Special Interest Group met at the same time as did the Hospital Libraries Section Executive Board for the second time. The New England Journal of Medicine held an informal meeting in the mid-afternoon as well.

Wednesday, May 7, 2003

The following MLA units held early morning meetings: Continuing Education Committee, Grants and Scholarships Committee, Oral History Committee, and section program planners. Informal meetings were held by the Department of Veterans Affairs Librarians and Pediatric Librarians Special Interest Groups. The Continuing Education Committee and the Section Council both met again during the afternoon.

Thursday, May 8, 2003

The MLA Continuing Education Committee met throughout the day.

OPEN FORUMS

Two concurrent sessions were held on Sunday, May 4, from 2:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.

Scholarly Publishing Forum

MLA President Linda Watson was the leader for the Scholarly Publishing Forum. Approximately 150 people attended. The purpose of the open forum was to gather input from MLA members on the scholarly publishing issues that are of most concern and to solicit short-term and long-term actions that MLA can take to influence scholarly publishing. President Watson was assisted in the forum by Linda Walton, who elicited the short-term and medium-term ideas for MLA action, and Mark Funk, who presented a brief overview of possible long-term solutions. Full details of the handouts presented and ideas generated at the open forum, as well as other useful information about publishing issues, are found at MLA's Scholarly Publishing Issues Website (http://www.mlanet.org/resources/publish/).

Compensation for Medical Librarians Forum

MLA President-Elect Patricia Thibodeau led the Compensation for Medical Librarians Forum. Approximately forty people attended. The purpose of the open forum was to gain feedback about what MLA can do for its members regarding compensation issues, to learn what resources members need to make their case, to identify the success stories or challenges, and to discover the initiatives MLA should pursue on behalf of its members. President Thibodeau was assisted in the forum by MLA Executive Director Carla Funk, who outlined what MLA can and cannot do to advocate for higher salaries and what resources the association has regarding compensation information. A variety of comments were received related to topics such as recognition of the Academy of Health Information Professionals credentialing program, effective strategies in negotiating salaries, and demonstrating value.

SUNRISE SEMINARS

Sunrise Seminars were again available to meeting attendees. On Monday, May 5, the following seminars were available: BIOSIS, BMJ Publishing Group, Cinahl Information Systems, EBSCO Information Services, NLM Online User's Meeting, Searching PsycINFO and PsycARTICLES for Behavioral Medicine and Mental Health, and UpToDate. On Tuesday, May 6, seminars were presented by EBSCO Information Services, EMBASE.com version 3.0, MD Consult, New England Journal of Medicine, Ovid, and Thomson ISI.

CALIFORNIA CHATS

New features of MLA '03 were the California Chats. These were informal discussion groups held from 4:00 p.m. until 6:00 p.m. in the Rose Garden on Sunday, May 4, and Monday, May 5. The casual setting provided networking opportunities for attendees. The topics and discussion leaders included the following: May 4, PDAs with Gregory Bodin, clinical librarianship with Cheryl Suttles, distance learning with Penny Worley, JCAHO with Linné Girouard, and evaluating MEDLINE searches with Russell Smith; and May 5, benchmarking with Amy Hardin, space planning with Cheryl Suttles, digital document delivery with Dena K. Plaisted, portals with Sarah Pimental, and multilingual patient-education materials with Ellen H. Howard.

XTREME RIDES

Another new feature at MLA '03 was the Xtreme Rides. Two concurrent sessions were held on Monday, May 5, from 3:30 p.m.to 5:00 p.m. The session with Rea Devados focused on institutional repositories and medical libraries with an emphasis on Dspace technology. “AAHSL Charting the Future: Pushing the Academic Health Sciences Library to Xtreme Involvement” was the second “ride” led by Karen Brewer, J. Michael Homan, Judith Messerle, and Gail A. Yokote. These discussions provided opportunities for attendees to learn about new programs and current issues.

NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE (NLM) UPDATE

A traditional feature of the annual meeting is the NLM Update. This session was held on Tuesday, May 6, from 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. The presenters were Donald A. B. Lindberg, director, Jack Snyder, associate director for specialized information services, and Betsey L. Humphreys, associate director for library operations, NLM, Bethesda, MD. They presented updates on NLM projects and plans.

LEGISLATIVE UPDATE

Logan Ludwig, chair, Governmental Relations Committee, provided an overview of MLA's legislative priorities and actions taken by the association during 2002/03 on several issues, including NLM and NIH funding, distance education, and intellectual property legislation.

Jane Griffith, assistant director for policy development at the National Library of Medicine, gave a report on the USA PATRIOT Act and related legislation and its impact on libraries and library patrons, particularly as this relates to issues of privacy and information access. These presentations took place on Tuesday, May 6, from 3:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.

OTHER SPECIAL EVENTS AND RECEPTIONS

Saturday, May 3, 2003

New Leaders Tea, 4:15 p.m. to 4:45 p.m.

Welcome reception and opening of Hall of Exhibits, Saturday evening. The exhibits were open through Tuesday afternoon, May 6.

Sunday, May 4, 2003

Majors Walk: The 15th Annual Walk for Fun, sponsored by J. A. Majors Co., from 6:30 a.m. to 8:00 a.m.

New Members/First-Time Attendees Breakfast, from 7:30 a.m. to 9:00 a.m.

Sharing Roundtables presented by Chapter Council. The luncheon event provided opportunities for members to conduct information discussions on the following thirty topics: archives—traditional and electronic, benchmarking, bioterrorism—library issues, chairs and incoming chairs, consortia purchasing for hospitals, consumer health, copyright issues with electronic journals and electronic books, distance education, electronic fund transfer system, electronic document delivery, electronic journals, evidence-based medicine, finance and treasurers, governmental relations, health literacy, informationists, license negotiation, PubMed LinkOut program, marketing and public relations, mentoring, one-person and one-librarian libraries, PDAs—beginning users, PDAs—experienced users, recruiting for the profession, retirement planning, salaries, strategic planning, technology issues for hospital librarians, virtual reference services, and Web managers.

International Visitors Reception, from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.

Library School Reunion, from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.

Friends of the National Library of Medicine Reception, from 7:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.

Tuesday, May 6, 2003

MLA Reception: A Sea of Words and Oceans of Music, from 7:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.

CONTINUING EDUCATION COURSES

The 2002/03 Continuing Education Committee offered the following courses on May 2, 3, and 7.

CE 141, Managing Electronic Resources and Their Licenses

CE 152, Words that Change Minds™

CE 163, Development and Fundraising for Health Sciences Librarians

CE 174, Ethics in Health Sciences and Consumer Health Librarianship

CE 185, Running with the Squirrels: Providing Library Services to Hospital Administrators

CE 186, Joint Commission Standards: Management of Information and Beyond

CE 197, Proving Your Worth: Professional, Business, and Political Tools

CE 198, Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA): What Health Sciences Librarians Need to Know

CE 200, Project Management: From Inception to Completion

CE 211, Planning and Managing Consumer Health Libraries

CE 212, Measuring and Reporting Usage of Electronic Resources

CE 223, Library Directors: Knowledge, Skills, and Career Paths

CE 245, Marketing as if Your Library Depended on It

CE 276, Face-to-Face: Strategies for Effective Consumer Health Communication

CE 300, Searching for Drug and Pharmaceutical Information Online

CE 321, Adventures in Public Health (Public Health 101)

CE 322, Molecular Biology and Genetics for Librarians

CE 333, Super Searcher

CE 334, Genomics, Proteomics, and Bioinformatics for Librarians

CE 345, Digging In: Hands-on Experience with the National Center for Biotechnology Information's (NCBI's) Molecular Databases

CE 346, Providing Health Information Resources and Services in Other Languages

CE 368, Advanced Database Search Techniques

CE 399, Data Detective: Finding the Jewels of Public Health Datasets

CE 470, Developing a New Role for Librarians: Teaching the Publication Process

CE 500, Providing and Evaluating Electronic Full-Text Information Delivery

CE 511, Advanced Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs) for Librarians

CE 572, Personal Digital Assistant (PDA) Medical Applications and Content for Librarians

CE 583, Personal Digital Assistant (PDA) 101

CE 640, Developing Your Own Web-Based Course: A Hands-on Workshop

CE 730, Research Methods: Overview of Vocabulary, Methodology, and Process

CE 741, Quality Filtering: Critical Appraisal and Synthesis of Biomedical Literature

One meeting symposium was also offered.

CE 840, Evidence-Based Nursing Practice: Needs, Tools, and Solutions: Sponsored by MLA's Nursing and Allied Health Resources Section (NAHRS) and the Interagency Council on Information Resources for Nursing (ICIRN) and held Saturday, May 3, from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

The twenty-seven premeeting courses, three postmeeting courses, and the symposium had a total registration of 693.

RESOURCES AND SERVICES

A Hospitality Center, staffed by the Local Assistance Committee (LAC) and other area experts, was open for a total of sixty hours, starting Thursday, May 1. The center provided meeting attendees with information and maps about local attractions. The Placement Service was open for a total of twenty and one-half hours, beginning Sunday, May 4. The Member Resource Room, equipped with various office equipment, was available for association business from Friday, May 2, through Wednesday, May 7. In the Hall of Exhibits were additional services including the Internet Cafe, which was open twenty-four hours a day from Friday, May 2, through Wednesday, May 7, and provided convenient Internet access, and the Learning Center, which offered numerous computer-based instruction programs for review. It was sponsored in part by Elsevier. This service was organized and staffed by members of the MLA Educational Media and Technologies Section. Two new services were the PDA beaming kiosks, sponsored by J. A. Majors Co. and Skyscape, and the technology pavilion, which allowed vendors to demonstrate their products in a theater-style arrangement at scheduled times Sunday, May 4, through Tuesday, May 6.

Acknowledgments

The editors of the proceedings thank T. Scott Plutchak, JMLA editor; the JMLA editorial board; Lynanne Feilen, director of publications of MLA; Susan Talmage, copy editor; and Steven J. Squires, former proceedings editor, for their suggestions and support as we explored and then implemented the change in organization of the proceedings content for 2003.


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