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Nucleic Acids Res. Mar 11, 1993; 21(5): 1225–1229.
PMCID: PMC309286

Splicing choice from ten variant exons establishes CD44 variability.

Abstract

The enormous heterogeneity of the surface protein designated CD44 is in part due to posttranslational modification, and in part due to differential splicing. Alternative splicing occurs within one particular region encoding the extracellular portion of the protein. Comparison of various cDNA clones with different 'inserts' in this variable region with sequences of genomic clones from the mouse has revealed the existence of at least ten exons from which sequences are chosen by alternative splicing. Various combinations of these exons account for the tremendous heterogeneity of CD44 molecules expressed in different tissues, and in progressing tumor cells. The existence of different isoforms of CD44 suggests a broad spectrum of yet unknown physiologic functions.

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Selected References

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