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Mol Biol Cell. Aug 1997; 8(8): 1481–1499.
PMCID: PMC276171

Yeast actin cytoskeleton mutants accumulate a new class of Golgi-derived secretary vesicle.

Abstract

Many yeast actin cytoskeleton mutants accumulate large secretory vesicles and exhibit phenotypes consistent with defects in polarized growth. This, together with actin's polarized organization, has suggested a role for the actin cytoskeleton in the vectorial transport of late secretory vesicles to the plasma membrane. By using ultrastructural and biochemical analysis, we have characterized defects manifested by mutations in the SLA2 gene (also known as the END4 gene), previously found to affect both the organization of the actin cytoskeleton and endocytosis in yeast. Defects in cell wall morphology, accumulated vesicles, and protein secretion kinetics were found in sla2 mutants similar to defects found in act1 mutants. Vesicles that accumulate in the sla2 and act1 mutants are immunoreactive with antibodies directed against the small GTPase Ypt1p but not with antibodies directed against the homologous Sec4p found on classical "late" secretory vesicles. In contrast, the late-acting secretory mutants sec1-1 and sec6-4 are shown to accumulate anti-Sec4p-positive secretory vesicles as well as vesicles that are immunoreactive with antibodies directed against Ypt1p. The late sec mutant sec4-8 is also shown to accumulate Ypt1p-containing vesicles and to exhibit defects in actin cytoskeleton organization. These results indicate the existence of at least two classes of morphologically similar, late secretory vesicles (associated with Ypt1p+ and Sec4p+, respectively), one of which appears to accumulate when the actin cytoskeleton is disorganized.

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Selected References

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