• We are sorry, but NCBI web applications do not support your browser and may not function properly. More information
Logo of eidLink to Publisher's site
Emerg Infect Dis. 1999 May-Jun; 5(3): 438–440.
PMCID: PMC2640776

Australian bat lyssavirus infection in a captive juvenile black flying fox.

Abstract

The newly emerging Australian bat lyssavirus causes rabieslike disease in bats and humans. A captive juvenile black flying fox exhibited progressive neurologic signs, including sudden aggression, vocalization, dysphagia, and paresis over 9 days and then died. At necropsy, lyssavirus infection was diagnosed by fluorescent antibody test, immunoperoxidase staining, polymerase chain reaction, and virus isolation. Eight human contacts received postexposure vaccination.

Full Text

The Full Text of this article is available as a PDF (46K).

Selected References

These references are in PubMed. This may not be the complete list of references from this article.
  • Gould AR, Hyatt AD, Lunt R, Kattenbelt JA, Hengstberger S, Blacksell SD. Characterisation of a novel lyssavirus isolated from Pteropid bats in Australia. Virus Res. 1998 Apr;54(2):165–187. [PubMed]
  • Feiden W, Kaiser E, Gerhard L, Dahme E, Gylstorff B, Wandeler A, Ehrensberger F. Immunohistochemical staining of rabies virus antigen with monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies in paraffin tissue sections. Zentralbl Veterinarmed B. 1988 May;35(4):247–255. [PubMed]
  • Constantine DG. Absence of prenatal infection of bats with rabies virus. J Wildl Dis. 1986 Apr;22(2):249–250. [PubMed]

Articles from Emerging Infectious Diseases are provided here courtesy of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Formats:

Related citations in PubMed

See reviews...See all...

Cited by other articles in PMC

See all...

Links

Recent Activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...