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J Med Libr Assoc. Jan 2008; 96(1): e1–e35.
PMCID: PMC2212333

Proceedings, 107th Annual Meeting Medical Library Association, Inc. Philadelphia, PA May 18–23, 2007

Frances H. Lynch, MLS, AHIP and Judith L. Rieke, MLS, PhD

CONTENTS

Introduction E-1Welcome to MLA '07 E-1Presidential Address: Jean Shipman (Plenary Session I) E-2Other Plenary Sessions E-5Awards Ceremony E-6Business Meeting I E-12Business Meeting II, Presidential Inaugural Address: Mark Funk, and MLA '08 Invitation E-16Section Programming I–III E-20Poster Sessions I–III E-26Other Meetings and Events E-31Open Forums E-32National Library of Medicine Update E-33Legislative Update E-33Other Special Events and Receptions E-34Sunrise Seminars E-34Technology Showcases E-34Continuing Education Courses and Symposia E-34Resources and Services E-35

INTRODUCTION

The Medical Library Association (MLA) held its 107th annual meeting in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, May 18–23, 2007, at the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown. The meeting theme was “Information Revolution: Change Is in the Air.” Total attendance was 2,512.

Additional meeting content, including the meeting program and some electronic presentations from business, plenary, poster, and section presentations can be found via the MLA '07 website <http://www.mlanet.org/am/am2007/>. Candid photos can be found at the site as well.

WELCOME TO MLA '07

Sunday, May 20, 2007

MLA President Jean P. Shipman, AHIP, welcomed members to MLA '07 where she emphasized the meeting theme “Information Revolution: Change Is in the Air.” She said that it was fitting that “we are in Philadelphia which holds such a special place not only in American history but in the history of MLA—the first MLA annual meeting was held in Philadelphia in 1898.” She pointed out that the world, the country, the profession, and MLA have changed in revolutionary ways since 1898—beyond anything our founders might have envisioned.

Before she continued the official welcome, she told the audience that each of the plenary sessions during the week would start with a research vignette. The vignettes illustrate one of MLA's priorities this year, the focus on the value of research to the profession. Featuring different members sharing their research experiences, the vignettes help celebrate MLA's year of research and the revision of MLA's research policy statement. [Research Vignette: Betsy L. Humphreys, AHIP; available at <http://www.mlanet.org/members/e-present/2007/> (members only).]

President Shipman thanked the 2007 NPC for planning a program designed to help attendees understand and navigate the changing environment in libraries today—with new products, services, and ever-changing technology. Members were encouraged to take time to network with colleagues at the social events such as breakfasts, lunches, dinners, and receptions. She also promoted taking time to enjoy the wonderful sights and tastes of Philadelphia—from the Liberty Bell and Reading Market to those renowned Philly cheese steaks.

Nina Long, AHIP, director of library services and archivist at the Wistar Institute, Philadelphia, and chair of the Philadelphia Chapter of MLA, brought greetings from the chapter. The cochairs of the 2007 National Program Committee (NPC)—Diana J. Cunningham, AHIP, director of the Medical Sciences Library, New York Medical College–Valhalla, and Susan Starr, director and associate university librarian, University of California–San Diego, Biomedical Library, La Jolla, California—and the cochairs of the 2007 Local Assistance Committee (LAC)—Anne K. Seymour, associate director, University of Pennsylvania Biomedical Library–Philadelphia, and Etheldra Templeton, executive director of the Snyder Memorial Medical Library at the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine— were presented to the group. First Ms. Cunningham and Ms. Starr extended their welcomes. They recognized and thanked the members of the NPC, the LAC, and the program planners. The LAC chairs, Ms. Seymour and Ms. Templeton, also welcomed everyone and thanked their committee members and volunteers.

President Shipman again thanked the committees for their hard work. She recognized and thanked the many valued sponsors. The MLA '07 sponsors generously contributed more than $104,000 to enrich the meeting. A list of the sponsors can be found at <http://www.mlanet.org/am/am2007/about/sponsors.html>.

Ms. Cunningham then introduced MLA President Shipman who gave her presidential address.

PRESIDENTIAL ADDRESS (PLENARY SESSION I)

[Slides are at <http://www.mlanet.org/members/e-present/2007/> (members only).]

Jean Shipman: Around this time last year, I challenged you in my presidential inaugural presentation to be “ANC” [antsy] about our future. With our meeting theme this year being “Information Revolution: Change Is in the Air,” I shared some lessons I learned about flying small planes through a pinch-hitters course I took. In this course, I learned that as a passenger in a small airplane, it is important to learn how to handle the plane in the event something unforeseen happens to the pilot. I learned that there is an order to what needs to be done and that that order is ANC: to A—aviate the airplane (know the basics of flying the plane), N—navigate (know where you are located and where you want to go in order to land the plane), and then, and only then, do you C—communicate (let others know that you are in a mayday situation). I encouraged us to collectively follow this mnemonic of ANC in our coming year.

Throughout the year, I have heard many positive comments from you, the members of MLA, about how this basic ANC mnemonic resonated with you. I am so pleased to know that with all of the changes that are in the air, that this basic mnemonic has helped to pilot us through this very busy past year.

It is not my intention with this presidential address to recap everything that has happened during the past year—we would be here for the rest of the meeting if I attempted to do so. Instead, what I will do is highlight the keystone events and their outcomes. Please refer to my annual report on MLANET for a complete list of accomplishments for the year.

All of us are being encouraged by our institutions to assess our impact, what it is we bring to the table and what value we offer through our existence. As your president, I felt it was important that I also be measured through an assessment process—with measurable outputs. Thus, I prepared a small chart of my measurable outputs.

Continuing my approach of looking at things with an “out-of-the-box” attitude, I'm going to change the order of the ANC mnemonic as I wish to report first on the major new initiatives achieved during the past year—or in pinch-hitter terms—the N—navigate part of being ANC. And referring to my presidential theme—I'm jumping immediately to the “Forging New Frontiers” portion of my theme.

The year really did start off at full throttle as Elliot Siegel from the National Library of Medicine (NLM) asked me during the presidential reception for M.J. Tooey, AHIP, and after my inaugural speech to consider how MLA and NLM could partner on achieving some of my presidential priorities. Within weeks after the Phoenix annual meeting, NLM reviewed a contract proposal from MLA for a health information literacy research project. This proposal, I'm pleased to report, became a funded quarter-of-a-million-dollar two-year multi-prong project that positions health sciences librarians as key partners in educating both hospital administrators and health care providers about the importance of health literacy and the role librarians can play in helping to effect change in this arena. A project coordinator, Sabrina Kurtz-Rossi, was hired in mid-February to lead the effort. TAP Consultants, a company located in Philadelphia, were soon hired to develop, implement, and analyze two needs assessments to determine the perceived awareness of hospital administrators and health care providers about health literacy and their perceived value of librarians as change agents in this area. The results of these needs assessments will be used to develop a curriculum that will be pilot-tested by seven hospital librarians. The curriculum will be adjusted applying obtained feedback from focus groups, and a final version will be available for any of us to use to educate our institutional personnel about this important public health initiative. A Web-based version will also be made available for any individual to do a self-assessment of his or her knowledge of the topic.

This project accomplishes two of my key presidential priorities—to have medical librarians recognized as key players in health literacy efforts and to establish partnerships with other organizations and agencies. Not only has MLA partnered with NLM and its National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NN/LM), but we are also working with the American Hospital Association's (AHA's) Society for Healthcare Consumer Advocacy. In addition, we achieved another priority through presenting this project at other health professional organizations' conferences. In April, I provided an overview of the project for the AHA patient advocacy membership group and introduced them to key NLM consumer health information resources at their annual conference in Tucson, Arizona. Using my piloting analogy, I applied the C of ANC—by communicating to others our skills and where we are heading with our efforts in this area.

This annual meeting's Wednesday health information literacy program, jointly sponsored by MLA's Section and Chapter Councils, will illustrate through a keynote speaker and panel how medical librarians have been involved with health information literacy. A continuing education course will be offered on the subject as a follow-up to the morning session. Public librarians in the local Philadelphia area have been invited to partake of this specific series of events, starting with a presidential breakfast, in MLA's effort to partner with other types of librarians who have direct contact with the general public.

Our health information literacy outreach continues with another keystone project that once again converges with another one of my presidential priorities, to further develop our international outreach efforts through our fairly new Librarians Without Borders (LWB) initiative. Through an $80,000 grant from Elsevier facilitated by MLA member Tony McSean, MLA's LWB committee members have been providing training to people in Africa, Asia, and Latin America, working with the Health InterNetwork Access to Research Initiative (HINARI), Access to Global Online Research in Agriculture (AGORA), and Online Access to Research in the Environment (OARE) organizations. This training, spearheaded by Lenny Rhine, has helped many individuals gain a better understanding of the health information resources available to them. In addition to this training, more international outreach efforts were achieved via a meeting with the Korean Medical Library Association during the 2006 International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA) meeting. As a result of this meeting, a bilateral agreement with this organization has been established and a complimentary one-year MLA institutional membership was granted to the organization. Two of their members are attending MLA this year— we welcome Jin-Young Park and Mal Yea Hwang from the Seoul National University Medical Library. If you are in the audience, please stand and be recognized. Thank you. Also at the same IFLA meeting, I provided a presentation about the information specialist in context professional. A resulting article summarizing this presentation is being published in the September issue of the IFLA Journal as there is a lot of international interest in this topic.

MLA and NLM are also working together to determine the current status of personal health records (PHRs) through the appointment of a combined task force that will be chaired by Dixie A. Jones, AHIP. This group is assessing the various records in existence, the potential for including health sciences librarians as sources of health information, and encouraging developers to recognize the role that librarians can play in helping individuals decipher the information contained in such personal records. Encouraging linkages to quality health resources is another goal of this task force. As more and more of our nation's citizens are able to document their health through such records, it is vital that our role as navigational assistants be incorporated into these records to ensure that our value is communicated. High technology in this case needs someone to provide the high touch—something we are experts at providing with our service orientation!

An unsolicited partnership opportunity with Google arose this year. Through the terrific guidance of Consumer and Patient Health Information Section chair, Howard Fuller, 21 medical librarians helped to tag quality health information Internet sites for Google's Co-op Health. Individuals seeking reliable information can subscribe to MLA's profile to help limit their Internet search results to those recommended by MLA members. To date, 719 individuals have become MLA subscribers and over 1,783 websites have been tagged by our 21 MLA members. My thanks to those individuals who made this unique partnership a success. Will those present, please stand and be recognized.

MLA has been C—communicating about its members' contributions to the general public's health literacy with the assistance of its public relations company, PCI, Inc. PCI has capitalized on several Internet and health care information-seeking behavior reports such as the 2006 Pew's Internet and American Life Project survey. Eighty placements with the media were accomplished last year, reaching over 54.6 million individuals. Several New Jersey librarians reported how pleased they were to see an article about medical librarians and their willingness to serve the public with their health information needs in their Sunday newspaper. We are communicating about our value and applying the C of the ANC flying mnemonic!

MLA, with PCI's assistance, partnered with several librarians in the Chicago area (from the University of Illinois–Chicago and Rush University) to offer classes to senior citizens in the city. Seniors received information about managing medications and about where to find quality and reliable health information. A Web-based version of the class will soon be available to all of us to use to continue such outreach efforts to this growing population.

PCI also helped to present the March 2007 MLA webcast about marketing our libraries, which was seen at ninety-eight sites in addition to forty-four individual viewers. Due to last year's overwhelming demand, at this annual MLA meeting, PCI will once again offer several free marketing sessions to MLA members.

MLA advocacy efforts have included sending letters (often with other information-related organizations) regarding the closure of the Environmental Protection Agency libraries, the reauthorization of National Institutes of Health funding, changes in scholarly communications, and, upon request, encouraging reconsideration of hospital library closures. A summary of legislative activity for the year is available on the MLANET site. In addition, MLA staff assisted the Colorado Council of Medical Librarians Advocacy Committee to develop an electronic presentation and brochure for hospital librarians to use to debunk some of the myths about Internet-based information and the resultant lack of need for hospital libraries.

Going back to the flying framework for this update, it is important that we continue to develop our skills or learn our A—aviation basics and “Reclaim Our Foundations.” Several milestones were reached in the professional development area this year. Starting in December, over sixteen MLA-accredited courses were converted into Web-based ones that can be taken from any location. A joint partnership with the NN/LM Greater Midwest Region made this possible.

Also, I was able to meet my goal of visiting at least two library and information schools—in fact, with the assistance of MLA Board members, seven i-schools, or information schools, were reached and one visit is planned for this fall. I met with students from all walks of life and all types of backgrounds. It was fascinating to learn of their intense interest in our field, and their excitement was contagious! Thank you to the students who might be in the audience today for giving me your time, and I wish you the best with your futures!

To enhance its relationship with i-school educators, MLA contracted to manage the Association for Library and Information Science Education (ALISE) organization on an annual basis. This has enabled MLA headquarters staff to look for potential areas of collaboration between the two organizations and to leverage the two organizations' efforts.

Our professional policies on education and research have been revised through the efforts of two task forces led by Rick Forsman, AHIP, FMLA, and Suzanne F. Grefsheim. These two task forces have presented their final drafts to the MLA Board, and they were accepted. Thanks go to the many MLA members who contributed to the successful revision of these key MLA documents.

An executive summary of the new educational policy is in your meeting bags. As you may have noticed, throughout this meeting we have and will be seeing “Research Vignettes” that highlight our different members' efforts with conducting research that adds to our knowledgebase. MLA and many of its sections also financially supported the “4th Evidence Based Library and Information Practice” conference, the first to be held in the United States, in Durham, NC, earlier this month. Thanks go to Joanne G. Marshall, AHIP, FMLA, and Carol Perryman for leading the planning for this great conference.

Several efforts at changing library standards have been initiated in the past year. MLA wrote letters to the American Osteopathic Association (AOA) and the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) encouraging them to alter their current library standards to reflect changes in technology, information delivery, and information service provision. Diana Balint and Carla J. Funk, CAE, were invited to the AOA Board meeting to further discuss our involvement. MLA's Nursing and Allied Health Resources Section (NAHRS), through the leadership of Melody Allison, the section chair, and Margaret Bandy, AHIP, MLA Board member, have developed a white paper that illustrates how hospital librarians can assist their institutions with getting Magnet status as well as maintaining it. We hope to use a version of this white paper to encourage the Magnet accreditation team to reflect librarians in their “14 Forces of Magnetism” and have approved the appointment of an MLA allied representative to this accrediting body to enhance our communications. In addition, Pamela Sherwill-Navarro, AHIP, and Deborah Lauseng are cochairing a NAHRS task force that is creating standards for nursing libraries.

Technology changes continue to direct our work, and MLA has helped educate us about emerging technologies and their potential and existing applications. In November, a webcast was conducted on new technologies with examples provided by several of our members. Mark E. Funk, AHIP, will share his upcoming year's presidential priorities with us this coming Tuesday morning, where he will encourage us to “Only Connect”—through the use of technology. MLANET has also received a facelift with the hiring of the company, Imaginary Landscape, and through the many efforts of the MLANET Editorial Board and headquarters staff. MLA will be acquiring a new association management software program during 2007/08, and we can expect more robust changes and enhancements as a result.

Hospital libraries and librarians' futures were a major emphasis this year for MLA as closures and downsizings continued to be realities. Many members of MLA's Vital Pathways task forces chaired by M.J. Tooey have been hard at work documenting the current status of hospital libraries through a recent survey, developing desired library standards as they relate to medical education of health care providers, and creating a white paper on the many roles hospital librarians can perform for their institutions. Please refer to the Vital Pathways website for further details about the accomplishments of these task forces.

MLA continues to provide its members with a full range of benefits, including its renowned continuing education courses and its quality publications—the Journal of the Medical Library Association, MLA News, and MLA-FOCUS. MLA has been recognized by other information organizations as one of the best small organizations in the country. A lot of MLA's achievements are the result of many hours of volunteerism given by its 4,500 members.

MLA also has some celebrating to do to recognize several anniversaries. Our Section and Chapter Councils have been in existence for twenty-five years. They have helped to “increase involvement of groups in the affairs of MLA and vice-versa by establishing mechanisms which allow each member's specialized interests to be represented at the Board level.” Would everyone who has served on either council, please stand and accept our appreciation.

Another birthday was recognized this year by MLA with a resolution. It is the thirty-fifth anniversary of the Health Sciences Library Association of New Jersey. Congratulations to this wonderful group! MLA's Oral History Committee is also having a birthday—for thirty years committee members have been helping to capture our rich heritage and document the expertise and personalities of our many notable members. Please be sure to see their poster at this meeting in honor of this anniversary. And last to be mentioned, but by no means least, the MLA Board of Directors presented a resolution to NLM in recognition of the fiftieth anniversary of the National Library of Medicine Act. NLM provides so much to the nation and to MLA members, and we appreciate all that the talented NLM staff does for us! Thank you NLM staff, and would you please stand?

I was able to witness members' efforts through my chapter visits. In talking with past MLA presidents about their most valued experience, attending chapter meetings ranked extremely high. I now understand why. I thoroughly enjoyed seeing many of you in your local context and appreciated your many efforts to provide professionally stimulating yet fun meetings. I especially appreciated the Upstate New York and Ontario Chapter's effort to arrange the only real snow I got to see this year. Thanks for the wonderful snowbound memories! I enjoyed sharing information about MLA through updates, and I was especially astonished at the competitiveness of some of you during the $25,000 Pyramid–type game show version of the update—especially the Midwest Chapter who were so eager at 8:00 a.m. in the morning!

Seriously, thank you for inviting me and other board members to participate in your very creative and delightful regional meetings. I appreciated all of your kind hospitality! I feel very enriched from my year as president as I got to know some of you much better, got to meet some of you for the first time, and got to think globally about how we all work together as a team to make our profession a truly great one. I thank all of you for this wonderful year!

Speaking of thanks, at the close of my presidential year, there are so many people I wish to thank. I now understand how Academy Award winners can go on for hours expressing their gratitude.

I especially want to thank the MLA Board of Directors for their brilliant contributions, their collegiality, and their willingness to pursue unknown frontiers with me. I learned a lot from each and every one of you and thank you for sharing your time and talents with me and for the work you have done for MLA. I thank the MLA headquarters staff—you are a very hard-working group and make the running of MLA transparent to us! Your ability to provide a basic organizational infrastructure coupled with our many special projects is phenomenal and is why MLA is recognized by others for its successful management.

I truly thank Carla Funk, MLA's executive director, for her tireless devotion to MLA, her wisdom and knowledge, and her international reputation as one of the finest library association leaders. I have enjoyed our weekly conversations, our many travels, and Carla's willingness to go out on a limb to see what lies beyond. What a scout! Thank you, Carla, for all of your wonderful support.

And thank you to my local supporters—the faculty and staff of the Tompkins-McCaw Library for the Health Sciences and Virginia Commonwealth University Libraries (please stand). When I accepted the MLA presidency, I knew I would need to depend on you to carry on without me, and I appreciate that you did so with such finesse and flair. And thank you to my supervisor, John Ulmschneider, who has given me so much support this year in terms of not only time away from my real job, but who has given others the potential to grow and for his listening ear and valuable mentoring services.

Then there's my cat Madrona, who as you can see, grew tired of all of my travels and decided to take things into her own hands—or should I say paws. She will forgive me I'm sure.

And last but not least, I wish to thank my dear husband Mark—I know you have given much to MLA with your understanding of my time away from home, my many requests for time to work on MLA stuff, and your never-ending appreciation of my passion for MLA and my professional commitment. I am forever grateful and thank you for all of your encouragement, support, and understanding. And you will get that bike ride across the country. Thank you Mark!

During my closing remarks, I'd like to share some of my favorite pictures from the past year.

I recently read an MLA presidential article, “The Medical Library Association: Aims, Activities, and a Brief History,” by L. Margueriete Prime who was our thirty-second president. This was a written record of a speech she gave at the first-ever MLA chapter meeting, at the Midwest Chapter in Chicago, Illinois, in the fall of 1951. I was struck by how closely our current organization's reasons for being aligned with those indicated in this article. Ms. Prime discussed organization communications such as the Exchange, the Bulletin of the Medical Library Association, and MLA's international outreach. She also included MLA's role with professional development; including training, certification, and the development of hospital and various health sciences school library standards. She even used the word “magnet” to stress how the Exchange was attracting members to the profession. Today, our foundations still deal with exchanges—not so much that of sharing journal issues—but with networking and talking with one another, which nicely coincides with Mark Funk's upcoming presidential priorities and theme of “Only Connect.”

Ms. Prime's article discussed our many early partnerships with other organizations, including IFLA (1934) and about members having roundtables to discuss subject headings, classifications, etc. She even was on to the idea that meetings should provide time to discuss reports and papers that had already been written. And we thought we were so clever with trying this “new” approach at this meeting! What a frontier woman Ms. Prime was!

It is her final words I'd like to echo now, “We owe much to the past, but more to the future. While we are in Philadelphia (… I'm not making this up …) commemorating the past, deeply involved with the present, planning for the future, let us recollect that, even as there is no such thing as a bystander, so we today are, in a sense, founders of this Association. It exists only through us and will be only what we make it. It is not wise to regret ever what a small part of time we play. All that matters is to make the small part count, and in as creative a way as possible. That is to say, we must give as well as take.”

I hope during this past year I had done just that— I hope I have given you a lot for the short time I served as your president. I will never regret the part I played and the many parts all of you play in making this association what it is. Your volunteerism and support has been phenomenal and is deeply appreciated. I trust that our many small parts have cumulated in making a major difference, and that we will continue to collectively direct our creativity to ensure our future, as we “reclaim our foundations and forge new frontiers.”

Let me repeat one phrase of Ms. Prime's that deserves such, “we must give as well as take.” Let us focus our efforts for the coming year in connecting to one another, to those we serve, and to the general public who need us. Let us give as we take. It is my pleasure to take a part of all of you with me as I preserve my memories of being MLA's president. It truly was an honor. Thank you for this privilege and for the many wonderful memories! I have been forever changed! Thank you!

OTHER PLENARY SESSIONS

II, May 20, 2007: The John P. McGovern Lecture

[Research Vignette: Kathleen Ann McKibbon, Faculty of the Health Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada; available at <http://www.mlanet.org/members/e-present/2007/> (members only).]

Introduction: Laurie L. Thompson, AHIP, Library Services, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center–Dallas.

Peer Review in Science and Medicine: Does It or Can It Work?: Arthur Caplan, director, Center for Bioethics, University of Pennsylvania–Philadelphia.

III, May 21, 2007: The Janet Doe Lecture

[Research Vignette: Janet L. Cowen, AHIP, Library, Maine Medical Center–Portland; available at <http://www.mlanet.org/members/e-present/2007/> (members only).]

Introduction: Julie J. McGowan, AHIP, FMLA, Ruth Lilly Medical Library, Indiana University School of Medicine–Indianapolis.

Constants, Context, and Change: The Pursuit of Purpose: Henry L. Lemkau Jr., FMLA, Ft. Lauderdale, Florida.

IV, May 23, 2007: The Joseph Leiter NLM/MLA Lecture

[Research Vignette: Debra S. Ketchell, AHIP, formerly Lane Medical Library, Stanford University School of Medicine; available at <http://www.mlanet.org/members/e-present/2007/> (members only).]

Introduction: Jeffrey T. Huber, School of Library and Information Studies, Texas Women's University–Houston.

Laws, Leaders, and Legends of the Modern NLM: Kent A. Smith, FMLA, Ashton, Maryland.

V, May 23, 2007: Keynote Speaker & Panel

[Research Vignette: Wayne J. Peay, FMLA, Eccles Health Sciences Library, University of Utah–Salt Lake City; available at <http://www.mlanet.org/members/e-present/2007/> (members only).]

Introduction: Dolores Judkins, Oregon Health & Science University Library–Portland.

Health Literacy: rEvolution in Roles: Keynote Speaker: Janet Ohene-Frempong, president of J O Frempong & Associates, Philadelphia, PA; Panel: Amy Louise Frey, AHIP, manager, Health Science Library, Hospital for Special Care, New Britain, CT, moderator; Marge Kars, AHIP, director, Bronson Health Sciences Library, Bronson Methodist Hospital, Kalamazoo, MI; Micki McIntyre, HealthyNJ librarian, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey–Stratford; Andrea Kenyon, director, Library, College of Physicians of Philadelphia; and Lynda Barker, associate professor, Library and Information Science Program, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI.

Posters: MLA Health Information Literacy Research Project: Sabrina Kurtz-Rossi, Health Information Literacy Research Project; Carla J. Funk, CAE, Medical Library Association, Chicago, IL; and Jean P. Shipman, AHIP, Tompkins-McCaw Library, Virginia Commonwealth University–Richmond.

Health Education Resources for English Language Learners: Margaret (Peg) Allen, AHIP, Hmong Health Education Network; Peter Yang, Wausau Area Hmong Mutual Association, Wausau, WI; Jeff Allen, Continuing Education, University of Wisconsin–Stevens Point; Mary Alice Gillispie, Healthy Roads Media, Healthy Roads Media, Bozeman, MT; Blong Yang and Ka Lia Moua, Hmong Health Education Network; and Kia Her, Wausau Area Hmong Mutual Association, Wausau, WI.

Accessing Health Information in the Rural South: A Survey of Residents in Allendale County, South Carolina: Janice May, Hands on Health-South Carolina; Lillian Trettin, Public Information and Community Outreach; and Nancy C. McKeehan; Library, Medical University of South Carolina–Charleston.

Teaching Teens to “Get Net Smart for Good Health”: Promoting Critical Thinking in Health Science Classes: Lillian Trettin, Public Information and Community Outreach, and Janice May, Hands on Health-South Carolina, Library, Medical University of South Carolina–Charleston.

AWARDS CEREMONY

The Awards Ceremony and Luncheon was held on Monday, May 21, 2007, and was supported by the American Medical Association's JAMA & Archives Journals. President Shipman began the ceremony by reminding the audience that the purpose of the ceremony was to honor colleagues who have made outstanding contributions to the profession and the association and to recognize their accomplishments. She thanked Janice Cox, AHIP, chair of the Awards Committee; Janette Schueller, chair of the Grants and Scholarship Committee; and all the jury members for their time and effort.

President Shipman announced that Kent Smith, FMLA, was unable to attend the ceremony but would receive his certificate when he presented the Joseph Leiter NLM/MLA Lecture at MLA '07 on Wednesday, May 23. At Sunday's meeting, Arthur Caplan—noted bioethicist, accomplished writer, professor, and speaker—had delivered the John P. McGovern Award Lecture and had received his award and certificate at that time.

MLA awards MLA Scholarships annually to students who show excellence in scholarship and potential for accomplishment in health sciences librarianship. The 2007 MLA Scholarship winner was Catherine Murch, a graduate student at the School of Library and Information Studies, University of Alabama–Tuscaloosa. The 2007 MLA Scholarship for Minority Students was presented to Paula Maez, a graduate student at the School of Information Resources and Library Science, University of Arizona–Tucson. The MLA Scholarship for Minority Students Annual Meeting, an award sponsored by the 2007 National Program Committee to help support a minority student who aspires to become a medical librarian to attend the annual meeting, was presented to Lisa Chow, who attends the School of Information and Library Science program at the Pratt Institute in New York City.

President Shipman introduced Alison Kinengyere and Jin Cheng as the 2007 Cunningham Fellows. Ms. Kinengyere is a medical librarian at Makerere University, Sir Albert Cook Medical Library, in Kampala, Uganda, Africa. She arrived in the United States in early May and has had the opportunity to study at two host library sites in Philadelphia and Cleveland, Ohio.

Ms. Cheng is deputy director of the Information Service Section at the Medical Library of Chinese People's Liberation Army, Beijing, China. Ms. Cheng arrived in the United States a few days earlier, and, following the annual meeting, she will study at two host sites in Syracuse, New York, and Bethesda, Maryland. Ms. Kinengyere and Ms. Cheng spoke briefly about their gratitude to their hosts and MLA for this opportunity.

EBSCO Information Services generously donates funds to provide up to $1,000 each for up to 4 librarians new to the profession to travel to MLA's annual meeting. This year's EBSCO/MLA Annual Meeting Grants were awarded to Agnes Chikonzo, deputy librarian of the College of Health Sciences Library at the University of Zimbabwe, Avondale, Harare; Ladonna Guillot, assistant professor/health sciences librarian at the Baton Rouge Nursing Library, Southeastern Louisiana University–Baton Rouge; Maureen Knapp, reference librarian at the John P. Isché Library, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center–New Orleans; and Lauren Young, instructor/outreach services librarian, Rowland Medical Library at the University of Mississippi Medical Center–Jackson.

The Hospital Libraries Section sponsors grants to provide librarians working in hospitals and similar clinical settings with the support needed for educational or research activities. The 2007 Hospital Libraries Section/MLA Professional Development Grant was awarded to Hella Bluhm-Stieber, AHIP, and Brenda Wong. Ms. Bluhm-Stieber, medical librarian at the Milton J. Chatton Medical Library, Santa Clara Valley Medical Center in San Jose, California, used her grant to attend the 2006 MLA Pacific Northwest Chapter fall meeting in Seattle, Washington. Ms. Wong, a medical librarian at Johnson Memorial Hospital in Stafford Springs, Connecticut, used her grant to attend three continuing education courses at MLA '07 to keep up to date with skills to manage electronic resources.

The David A. Kronick Traveling Fellowship was established in 2001 with an endowment from the Bowden-Massey Foundation. It is awarded annually to an MLA member to cover expenses involved in traveling to three or more medical libraries in the United States or Canada for the purpose of studying a specific aspect of health information management. This year's recipient is Michele R. Tennant, AHIP, who was also the recipient of the Donald A. B. Lindberg Research Fellowship. Dr. Tennant is a bioinformatics librarian at the University of Florida Health Sciences Library and the UF Genetics Institute in Gainesville, Florida. Her goal for the Kronick fellowship is to travel to various bioinformatics libraries in the United States to explore models for library-based support for bioinformatics programs.

The Donald A. B. Lindberg Research Fellowship, established in 2001 with contributions from MLA members and other people and companies in the health care community, is awarded annually through a competitive grant process to a qualified health care professional, researcher, educator, administrator, or librarian. MLA established the fellowship to fund research that links the information services provided by librarians to improved health care. The fellowship is named in honor of Dr. Lindberg, director of the National Library of Medicine (NLM) since 1984, in recognition of his significant national and international achievements at NLM, the world's largest medical library. Dr. Tennant, the fifth recipient of the award, will study the bioinformatics information–seeking skills and information needs of a diverse set of biomedical and biological researchers, students, and instructors through online assessment of researcher skills at various institutions.

The MLA Research, Development, and Demonstration Project Grant promotes excellence in health sciences librarianship and information science. This year's winners are Fern Cheek, AHIP, Lynda Hartel, and Sally Harvey, AHIP. Ms. Cheek and Ms. Hartel, who are employed as medical librarians at the Prior Health Sciences Library at Ohio State University–Columbus, plan to use their grant to look at electronic book usage in the health sciences setting to help their library and others make informed decisions on future e-book purchases. Ms. Harvey, director of learning resources and continuing medical education at the Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center Library in Phoenix, Arizona, will study the publication rate of poster entries and abstracts from MLA annual meetings in peer-reviewed or respected professional and trade journals.

The MLA Continuing Education award is awarded annually to an MLA member to assist with the development of theoretical, administrative, or technical aspects of medical librarianship. This year's recipients were Rick Wallace, AHIP, assistant director at Quillen College of Medicine Library, East Tennessee State University–Johnson City, who took an evidence-based workshop at Duke University in March 2007 that will enable him to train librarians at his institution in the principles of evidence-based medicine, and Alice Weber, a medical librarian at the Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library at the University of Utah–Salt Lake City, who plans to take an online MLA continuing education course on filtering using evidence-based skills. (Ms. Weber was unable attend, so her certificate was mailed.)

The Estelle Brodman Award for the Academic Medical Librarian of the Year was established with a gift from Irwin H. Pizer and is given to an association member who has made outstanding contributions to academic medical librarianship as demonstrated by excellence in performance, publications, research, service, or a combination thereof. It was noted with sadness that Estelle Brodman passed away this March at the age of ninety-two. Her impact on medical librarianship as a scholar, teacher, and researcher was apparent throughout her long and distinguished career. She worked at Columbia University, NLM, and later as director of the Washington University Medical School Library in St. Louis. She served on the MLA Board of Directors and was MLA president from 1964–1965, served as editor of the Bulletin of the Medical Library Association for ten years, delivered the 1971 Janet Doe Lecture, and was awarded the Marcia C. Noyes Award, MLA's highest honor, in 1974. She was a true visionary and leader for standards in the academic medical library.

The 2007 Estelle Brodman Award was presented to Jan LaBeause, AHIP, director of the Medical Library and Learning Resources Center, Mercer University School of Medicine, Macon, Georgia. Ms. LaBeause's contributions to the academic world have been extensive, particularly influencing health care in the state of Georgia and at Mercer University. She began her career working at a children's hospital in Memphis and then moved to Mercer. She is a Distinguished Member of the Academy of Health Information Professionals and serves as co-coordinator for Georgia's Go Local Project, a state outreach project. She also served as the first nonphysician president of the Georgia Rural Health Association. At Mercer University, she holds numerous community and campus leadership positions. Professionally, she has served on various MLA committees including the Bylaws Committee and the Joint MLA/Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries Legislative Task Force.

The Lucretia W. McClure Excellence in Education Award was established in 1998 and first presented in 1999, in honor of one of MLA's most respected members. The award recognizes an outstanding educator in the field of health sciences librarianship and informatics who demonstrates skills in teaching, curriculum development, mentoring, research, or leadership in education at local, regional, or national levels. President Shipman presented the 2007 award to Renata Geer, technical information specialist at the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), NLM, Bethesda, Maryland. Ms. Geer has used her background and experience in information technology, sciences, and education to take a leadership role in integrating bioinformatics instruction, resources, and services into medical libraries. In particular, she envisioned a role for medical librarians to provide services and instruction in bioinformatics and was a pioneer in bringing forth her vision to develop and teach courses to librarians in this area. Since the mid-1990s, she has developed several MLA continuing education courses on genetics and bioinformatics and taught a molecular biology information resource course, which has been converted into an MLA online continuing education course. She was instrumental in the development of a five-day course, NCBI's “Advanced Workshop for Bioinformatics Information Specialists (NAWBIS),” and has trained regional trainers to offer these sessions throughout the nation. Currently, Ms. Geer is converting all modules of her courses into electronic presentation files to make them more readily available for instructors, class attendees, and other users. Ms. Geer demonstrates a strong commitment to medical librarianship and has shared her knowledge broadly by teaching and promoting excellence in education.

The Lois Ann Colaianni Award for Excellence and Achievement in Hospital Librarianship is given to a professional who has made significant contributions to the profession in overall distinction or leadership in hospital library administration or service; has produced a definitive publication related to hospital librarianship, teaching, research, or advocacy; or has developed or applied innovative technology to hospital librarianship. The 2007 recipient was Ethel Madden, director of knowledge management at the Ochsner Clinic Foundation, New Orleans, Louisiana. Ms. Madden helped transform her library from a collection of modest resources to a library that serves as an integral part of the Ochsner Health System. She has served as an adjunct professor teaching health information courses at Louisiana State University School of Library and Information Sciences. Outside the medical library, Ms. Madden showed tireless dedication and leadership to the entire community in restoring library services to the community in the wake of Hurricane Katrina, well beyond the scope of daily hospital librarianship. She obtained and found funding for the Medical Library Recovery Project that provided aid to twenty-six separate sites to facilitate patient and professional information access. As stated in a letter of support, “Ethel swiftly acted with compassion and a clear head to provide both medical information and human touch to the community.” Ms. Madden fully embodies the spirit and criteria of the Colaianni Award. She could not attend the annual meeting so her certificate was mailed.

The Louise Darling Medal for Distinguished Achievement in Collection Development in the Health Sciences, endowed by Ballen Booksellers, recognizes distinguished achievement in collection development in the health sciences. This year's award was presented to Esther Carrigan, AHIP, associate dean and director of the Medical Sciences Library at Texas A&M University–College Station. She has had a long and distinguished career in collection development and, over the course of ten years, has developed the veterinary collection at her library to be one of the most comprehensive in the nation. She shares her knowledge by coordinating consortia purchases and information sharing for colleagues throughout her region and nationally and has been very active over the years in the Veterinary Medical Libraries Section of MLA. Through her participation in the section, she was instrumental in a review of veterinary medicine that has resulted in improved coverage of veterinary literature at NLM. Ms.Carrigan is also a Distinguished Member of the Academy of Health Information Professionals.

The Thomson Scientific/Frank Bradway Rogers Information Advancement Award is sponsored by Thomson Scientific and recognizes outstanding contributions in the application of technology to the delivery of health sciences information, to the science of information, or to the facilitation of the delivery of health sciences information. The 2007 award was presented to the Legacy Tobacco Documents Library project. Karen Butter, AHIP, accepted the award on behalf of the group that was instrumental in the development of the online library: Ms. Butter, Heidi Schmidt, Robert Mason, Kirsten Neilsen, Albert Jew, and Stanton Glantz. This project, located at the University of California– San Francisco, is an online multimedia database of tobacco industry documents that resulted from the 1998 master settlement agreement between the attorneys general of most states and major US tobacco corporations. The library comprises more than seven million tobacco documents related to the tobacco industry and serves as a model for an open access digital repository library. The development team created a pioneering and complex search method to allow searching across the entire collection and to accommodate the extensive growth of the collection. It has an automated routine to continually update and incorporate relevant new documents into the collection. As one letter of recommendation mentions, “the Legacy Library shows the power of libraries to make information available on a global scale with broad impact.”

The Majors/MLA Chapter Project of the Year Award recognizes excellence, innovation, and contribution to the profession of health sciences librarianship by an MLA chapter and is sponsored by Majors Scientific Books. For 2007, the award was presented to the Upstate New York and Ontario Chapter (UNYOC) of MLA for their innovative Academy of Health Information Professionals membership survey at both the chapter and national level. Elizabeth Irish, AHIP, Tom Flemming, AHIP, Julia Sollenberger, AHIP, FMLA, Gail Botta, AHIP, and Cristina Pope, AHIP, created the survey. Amy Gische Lyons, AHIP, president of UNYOC, accepted the award on behalf of the participants.

From time to time, the officers and the board of directors see that an exceptional contribution has been made to the profession and the goals of the association and, therefore, elect to give the President's Award, recognizing the significant contribution. For 2007, the award was presented to Beth M. Wescott, Southeastern/Atlantic Regional Network access coordinator for the National Network of Libraries of Medicine in Baltimore, Maryland, in recognition of her valuable contributions to health information literacy on behalf of the association and its members. Ms. Wescott is a leader in health information literacy, providing librarian education, outreach, and training that features easy-to-read and useful health care information for consumers. She won the Institute for Health Care Advancement Award in 2004 for outstanding achievement in health literacy. Her easy-to-read health and wellness material for a consumer course is an integral part of MLA's Consumer Health Information Specialization program. Ms. Wescott's involvement in projects, standards, and teaching will further the cause of health information literacy for years to come.

The Murray Gottlieb Prize was established in 1956 by a gift from the Old Hickory Bookshop to recognize and stimulate health sciences librarians' interest in the history of medicine. The 2007 Murray Gottlieb Prize was awarded to Elizabeth Connor, AHIP, science liaison at the Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina, for her paper, “The Body Politic: The Contributions of Physician-Patriot Joseph Warren.”

The Rittenhouse Award is presented annually by MLA for the best unpublished paper on health sciences librarianship or medical informatics written by a student in an American Library Association–accredited program of library and information studies or a trainee in an internship in health sciences librarianship or medical informatics, and is sponsored by the Rittenhouse Book Distributors, King of Prussia, Pennsylvania. This year's recipient was Susan Miller for her paper, “The Necessity of the Hospital Library to the Institution and the Community It Serves.” Ms. Miller attends the Department of Library Science program at Clarion University in Clarion, Pennsylvania.

The newly created T. Mark Hodges International Service Award was presented for the first time by MLA. This award was established to honor outstanding individual achievement in promoting, enabling, and/or delivering improvements in the quality of health information internationally through the development of health information professionals, the improvement of libraries, or the increased use of health information services. The first awardee was T. Mark Hodges, who passed away last year. Mr. Hodges had a long and illustrious career in medical librarianship and, in his last position, served as professor of medical administration, emeritus, and director of the Vanderbilt University Medical Center Library from 1972 until his retirement in 1995. The award recognized many of Mr. Hodges's achievements in international efforts on behalf of MLA, which included: serving as a librarian on three continents; working to reestablish the Cunningham endowment; writing a history of the International Cooperation Section, of which he was a member since its inception; and acting as the MLA representative to the new Morton Bursary Fund. Other international efforts include induction as a fellow of the UK's Library Association in 1990 and contributing to the publications of its medical, health, and welfare group. Mr. Hodges was a very active member of MLA for many years and of the Southern Chapter of MLA. The award was accepted on his behalf by his wife, Judith Hodges.

Judith Hodges: I am not sure which would have made Mark prouder—to receive an award for international service or to have such an award named for him. The combination of both honors would have awed—and then delighted him immeasurably. And even I feel honored, merely to have been asked to accept this award posthumously in Mark's name. Joining me in relishing this honor are our daughter, Sara, and Mark's brother, John, who are seated at the table in front of me. Mark loved MLA. Some of his (and our) best friends were made in this organization. And if you are one of the many MLA members who sent me a lovely note or card after Mark's death last year, please forgive me if I did not acknowledge it. I read and saved every one of those precious documents. (And true to my profession, I even alphabetized them for ready reference!) After Mark's death last year, I had the bittersweet task of clearing out his office in the medical emeritus suite at Vanderbilt. Bitter, because his death was so unexpected. As I shredded some items, distributed others to various sources, and decided which precious few to pass on to our children or save for myself, I felt as if I was disassembling a life. Sweet, because I found impressive records of Mark's accomplishments and some beautiful tributes to him for some of these accomplishments, many of them from people in this room. On the wall of Mark's office was the framed certificate from MLA's International Cooperation Section recognizing (and I quote), “extensive service in researching and writing the history of the International Cooperation Committee and Section, continued leadership, and dedication toward the success of the International Cooperation Section, Medical Library Association.” Tucked into the frame was the strip of paper from a Chinese fortune cookie and it said, “You will be awarded some great honor.” Mark was not the kind of person who routinely hung Chinese fortunes from certificates of recognition, so this one must have been very special to him. Although a naturalized American for several decades, Mark was still very much an Englishman and rejoiced in his participation in the International Cooperation Section and all the friends he made through that participation. Mark wasn't wrong very often, but he was wrong then if he thought that certificate was the greatest possible honor he would receive for his international involvement. This honor that you have bestowed on him by naming an award for him and presenting the first one to him posthumously, is indeed the greatest honor. Thank you.

A highlight of each MLA annual meeting is the Janet Doe Lecture on the history or philosophy of medical librarianship. Henry Lemkau Jr., FMLA, delivered the 2007 lecture, “Constants, Context, and Change: The Pursuit of Purpose.” Mr. Lemkau, recently retired, served as director and chairman of the Department of Medical Library and Biomedical Communications at the University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine in Miami, Florida.

President Shipman then announced that the Board of Directors had named five association members as MLA Fellows. Fellows are chosen for their outstanding contributions to health sciences librarianship and to the advancement of the purposes of MLA. President Shipman introduced these five new Fellows as follows:

  • Nancy Clemmons, AHIP, FMLA: Along with her many awards and accomplishments, Nancy Clemmons can now add the prestigious honor of MLA Fellow to her list. Ms. Clemmons, recently retired, has had a long and illustrious career. As deputy director at the Lister Hill Library of the Health Sciences at the University of Alabama–Birmingham, she rose through the ranks to achieve appointment as full professor and, upon her retirement, last summer received emeritus status as a faculty member. When she served as interim director, the library's physical plant was completely renovated and educational programs expanded. Ms. Clemmons also made time to teach, nurture, and mentor many students entering the profession including her daughter, Susan. Ms. Clemmons has contributed extensively to MLA and the Southern Chapter over the years. She served on the MLA Board of Directors from 2003–2006 and has participated in over twenty-eight MLA committees at the national and chapter level. She is a Distinguished Member of the Academy of Health Information Professionals and was the board liaison to the Credentialing Committee from 2003–2006.
  • Kathryn J. Hoffman, AHIP, FMLA: I am pleased to welcome Kathryn Hoffman as a Fellow of the association. Her impact on the profession is far-reaching at the local, regional, and national levels. Since 1995, she has served as the executive director at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center Research Medical Library–Houston. Building on a tradition of excellence, she has developed the library into one of the finest research libraries in the country and the largest specialized research patient care library in the region. Technology has remained a top priority over the years. Since the early 1990s, she planned and built a new branch library, supervised sixty full-time equivalents, provided new computers for the staff, and developed a state-of-the-art fully networked teaching lab. She has published numerous papers and given presentations on a diverse range of topics nationwide. Her consultations include Roswell Park Cancer Institute and Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center.
  • Sheldon Kotzin, FMLA: It is with great pleasure I recognize Sheldon Kotzin as an MLA Fellow. Mr. Kotzin joined the NLM staff in 1969 and has been promoted to increasingly responsible positions throughout his career. Since 1998, Mr. Kotzin has served as executive director of MEDLINE. In this role, he has made significant worldwide contributions, ensuring that the best journals, both print and electronic, are indexed in PubMed, so that libraries across the world are enriched by MEDLINE and can access the database free of charge. He was recently named associate director of library operations at NLM, an indication of his contributions and the high esteem held for him at the National Library of Medicine. Over the years, he has contributed extensively to MLA, serving on a wide range of MLA committees and juries, including two annual program committees, the Centennial Celebration Committee, and the Janet Doe Lectureship Jury. Mr. Kotzin has made numerous presentations at regional, national, and international meetings. He presented a paper on “Archiving NIH Research Results in PubMed Central” at the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA) conference in Olso, Norway, 2005. NLM presented him with the National Institutes of Health Directors Award in 1991 and the NLM Directors Award in 1990. A letter of reference sums up Mr. Kotzin's qualifications, “There is no doubt that he is eminently qualified to join the select group of individuals that represent the highest ideals of our association and profession.”
  • James Shedlock, AHIP, FMLA: Along with the other four Fellows receiving this year's award, James Shedlock can now add the prestigious title of Fellow to his list. Mr. Shedlock has been an MLA member since 1976 and has been the director of the Galter Health Sciences at Northwestern University in Chicago, Illinois, since 1991. A colleague summarizes, “Jim has a demonstrated history of notable leadership in MLA, remains an outstanding achiever, has produced significant scholarship and is held in high regard by his fellow professionals.” Mr. Shedlock's renovation of the Galter Library established a standard for renovation projects that is still referenced over a decade later. He has explored and utilized leading computer technologies at the Galter Library and is known as an outstanding teacher to staff, with over forty publications, presentations, and papers contributed to the profession. Currently, he serves on the Biomedical Library and Informatics Review Committee (BLIRC) for NLM. He has made extensive contributions to MLA, serving on numerous committees, most recently as the 2006 National Program Committee chair and on the Board of Directors from 1996–1999. He received the Thomson Scientific/Frank Bradway Rogers Information Advancement Award in 1998 and is a Distinguished Member of the Academy of Health Information Professionals.
  • Patricia Thibodeau, AHIP, FMLA: I am pleased to welcome Patricia Thibodeau as an MLA Fellow. Ms. Thibodeau is the associate dean for library services and archives at the Duke University Medical Center Library, Durham, North Carolina. In this role, she oversees management of the library and medical center archives and represents the library on many key internal and external committees and task forces. Ms. Thibodeau has acquired a unique, multifaceted perspective on the profession with more than two decades of experience. She first served as a hospital librarian, became an Area Health Education Center (AHEC) medical library director, and then began a long, productive career at Duke as an academic health sciences librarian and director. Her various leadership roles focus on three major areas with a significant impact on our profession—advocacy for hospital librarians, scholarly communication, and international leadership. Her recent work is reflected in scholarly publishing issues. She has published a number of articles in refereed journals on fair use, pricing, and open access. In 2004, she received the MLA's President's Award in recognition of her scholarly publishing advocacy initiatives on behalf of MLA and its members. Her recent international efforts are reflected in her service on MLA's Task Force on Global Initiatives 2004 to the present. As one of her colleagues stated in a letter of recommendation, “Pat's achievements in support of MLA's goals have been significant and wide ranging.” During her MLA presidency in 2003/04, scholarly communication was put on the map as a national issue, and she initiated the early work on what is now called the Vital Pathways Task Force, addressing issues critical to hospital librarians. Ms. Thibodeau more than meets the requirements of an MLA Fellow.

President Shipman continued: The highest honor that the Medical Library Association confers on any individual is the Marcia C. Noyes Award. We have come to the place in today's awards program for presentation of that special distinction. I am pleased to ask Judith Messerle, AHIP, FMLA, the 2005 Noyes winner to introduce this year's recipient.

Ms. Messerle: Today, I have the privilege and pleasure of introducing the 2007 Marcia C. Noyes Award winner, Betsy L. Humphreys, AHIP. This award for high contribution to the association and to the profession is not automatically given annually, but occasionally, when one of MLA's own rises to such distinction as to merit MLA's highest honor. Betsy Humphreys is such a person. In fact, those who know her readily acknowledge that she is an extraordinary medical librarian. Betsy has the rare ability to think strategically and tactically. She can see the big picture, imagine the goals, foresee the obstacles, and detail and execute the plan for profession-changing accomplishments:

  • Accomplishments such as the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS), which brought together thesauri from many disciplines, permitting searches and inquiry across the boundaries of many biomedical groups. UMLS has been used by individual libraries to manage in-house resources and currently runs behind PubMed and other NLM databases to improve recall and precision for searchers throughout the world. In the process, Betsy was also able to negotiate a US license for the Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine (SNOMED) vocabulary, thereby removing one significant barrier to the development of the electronic health record in the United States.
  • Accomplishments such as the NLM focus on public health, a mission ten years in the making. Betsy started this effort and has continued to provide energy and direction to its development.
  • Accomplishments such as the expansion of NLM's Library Associate Fellowship and the collaboration in other NLM initiatives for the education and development of leaders in the medical library profession.

Betsy's skills and talents are known personally to many of you, for she is more than willing to share her knowledge, make useful suggestions, and encourage and broker collaborations. These same skills and talents have seen her career flourish at the National Library of Medicine over the last thirty-four years as she rose from librarian, Serials Records Section, to her current position as deputy director of the National Library of Medicine. Well published across a wide variety of topics and venues, Betsy is a recognized authority in many domains, including medical librarianship, medical informatics, standards, vocabulary development, UMLS, and public health information to name a few. She has an extraordinary breadth of interest and command of multiple disciplines. Not surprisingly, this breadth of knowledge and her strong speaking and writing abilities bring many opportunities to educate and illustrate to a broad spectrum of professionals the importance of medical librarianship and quality information management. Betsy is one of those few amazing individuals whose intelligence and hard work make a difference for many. Her contributions to the field of medical librarianship have strengthened the work of health sciences librarians throughout the world. She is a modest person who shares credit easily and whose logical, strong, pragmatic approaches to problems brings many into the development of solutions. She is a star in our library world, and it is most fitting that she receive MLA's highest honor. Please join me in congratulating the 2007 Marcia C. Noyes Award Winner, Betsy Humphreys.

President Shipman concluded the session by saying that the awards ceremony and luncheon serves as an important reminder of the numerous accomplishments our peers have made to the profession. It simultaneously provides the encouragement to continue aspiring toward higher levels of achievement. In recognizing these individuals, we affirm the “best and brightest” in the field of health sciences librarianship.

BUSINESS MEETING I

Sunday, May 20, 2007

[A podcast of this business meeting, the research vignette, and slides from the treasurer's and executive director's reports can be found at <http://www.mlanet.org/members/e-present/2007/> (members only).]

President Shipman opened the first business meeting of 2007 at 3:00 p.m. with a research vignette featuring Claire Twose, Welch Library, Johns Hopkins University. She then introduced MLA Executive Director Carla J. Funk, CAE. Ms. Funk presented the members of the MLA Board of Directors: President Jean Shipman, AHIP; President-elect Mark Funk, AHIP; Immediate Past President M.J. Tooey, AHIP; Treasurer Dixie Jones, AHIP; Chapter Council Chair Sarah Gable, AHIP; Section Council Chair Tovah Reis; and Directors Margaret Bandy, AHIP, Craig Haynes, AHIP, Faith Meakin, AHIP, T. Scott Plutchak, AHIP, Connie Schardt, AHIP, and Linda Walton. Appointed officers: Lucretia McClure, AHIP, FMLA, parliamentarian, and Linné Girouard, AHIP, sergeant-at arms.

Ms. Funk also recognized the members who serve in various editorial positions on behalf of the association: Melissa Just, AHIP, outgoing MLANET editor (given token of thanks); Melissa De Santis, AHIP, incoming MLANET editor; Nunzia B. Giuse, AHIP, FMLA, editor of the Journal of the Medical Library Association; and Linda M. G. Katz, AHIP, editor of the MLA News.

President Shipman then asked attendees to join her in a moment of silence to honor the memories of the many valuable members who had died during the year as screens displayed names and assembled photographs of Godfrey Belleh, Estelle Brodman, Lois O. Clark, Linda F. Dorrington, Frederick G. Kilgour, Linda Nanette King, Cecile E. Kramer, and Cheryl Y. Newman.

Ms. Funk then recognized the efforts of chapter chairs, section chairs, special interest group (SIG) conveners, committee chairs, task forces chairs, and MLA representatives to allied organizations. She also acknowledged any of the 627 new members who had joined MLA since the 2006 annual meeting (a new record) who were present.

President Shipman called to order Business Meeting I of the MLA 2007 annual meeting and asked if the quorum of 250 of the voting members required for transaction of business was achieved. After Sergeant-at-Arms Girouard confirmed that the 356 members present represented a quorum, the president called on Secretary Craig Haynes to move adoption of the Rules of the Assembly.

Mr. Haynes explained that the Rules of the Assembly included information on addressing the chair, presenting motions, debating, and voting and are available on MLANET. At the direction of the Board of Directors, he then moved that the Rules of the Assembly, as they appear on MLANET, be adopted. Voting paddles were raised, and, there being a majority in the affirmative, the rules were adopted.

Mr. Haynes noted that the agendas for the 2007 business meetings were on pages 25 and 32 of the Official Program. Then, by direction of the Board of Directors, he moved that the revised agenda for the 2007 business meetings of the Medical Library Association be adopted. Again, the vote was affirmative and the agendas adopted.

President Shipman announced that in November 2006, ballots for MLA's election of 2007/08 officers, Board of Directors, and Nominating Committee's members were sent electronically or by postal service to all eligible voting members of the Medical Library Association. One thousand three hundred eighty-two valid ballots were returned from 3,544 eligible members, a participation rate of 39.7%. On December 13, 2006, the election results were certified by Christopher M. Keran and Amy C. Ebli from Survey and Ballot Systems of Eden Prairie, Minnesota, the firm that MLA contracted with to conduct the election. The election results were announced in the February 2007 issue of the MLA News, and complete election results, including vote totals, were published in the 2006/07 annual report, which is available on MLANET.

Election results: President-elect: Mary L. Ryan, AHIP, FMLA. MLA Board of Directors (three-year term): Gary Freiburger, AHIP, and Laurie L. Thompson, AHIP. Paula Raimondo, AHIP, who was elected at the 2006 annual meeting as Chapter Council liaison, will also serve as a director from 2007 to 2010. Nominating Committee: Eric D. Albright, AHIP; Kristine Alpi, AHIP; Marcus Banks, AHIP; Elizabeth Eaton; Patricia Hammond, AHIP; Teresa Knott, AHIP; Beverly Murphy, AHIP; Debra Rand, AHIP; and Jean Siebert, AHIP. M.J. Tooey, AHIP, immediate past-president, will chair the 2008/09 Nominating Committee.

For the first item of new business, President Shipman called on Ms. Jones to present the treasurer's report.

Dixie Jones: Before getting into figures, I will explain how the association's budget works and list the key players for the Medical Library Association's fiscal health care team:

  • The Board of Directors has the responsibility of setting priorities and objectives. The board approves action plans and the association business plan.
  • The treasurer coordinates financial discussion and reports to the board and the membership, as well as monitors overall financial activities.
  • MLA headquarters staff drafts the budget based on the objectives approved by the board. They implement the approved budget to achieve desired financial results and operational objectives and issue the financial statements.
  • The auditors examine financial records to assure that the financial statements provide an accurate picture of MLA's financial condition in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles.
  • The members, vendors, donors, and consumers of MLA products are the sources of MLA's financial support, which is vital to its ability to fulfill its mission.

Mission: The Medical Library Association (MLA) is organized exclusively for scientific and educational purposes and is dedicated to the support of health sciences research, education, and patient care.

MLA fosters excellence in the professional achievement and leadership of health sciences library and information professionals to enhance the quality of health care, education, and research.

The cycle for association financial activities is the calendar year, i.e., MLA's fiscal year runs from January through December. At the fall board meeting, the board sets objectives for the coming year and the headquarters staff then works on a business plan budget during the fall, based on these objectives. In December, the business plan is presented to the Board of Directors who review the plan and the budget, which begins implementation in January.

In 2006, a deficit budget was planned. However, the year finished in the black with net revenue of $52,661. Each year, an audit is conducted and posted on MLANET. The 2006 auditor's report may be found under Financial Reports, under Staff and Headquarters Information, or by going directly to this URL: <http://www.mlanet.org/members/organization/hq_docs.html> (members only).

The revenue generated in 2006 is being used during 2007 to fund:

  • a contribution toward endowment of the Donald A. B. Lindberg Research Fellowship,
  • content management for MLANET,
  • implementation of the revised research policy statement, and
  • travel for advocacy to support our members.

The 2007 budget is over $3 million. Revenue is projected to exceed expenses by over $10,000. As you can see from the pie chart on the screen, dues provide only about 22% of the association's operating budget income. The annual meeting generates 40% of MLA's revenues. Of course, the annual meeting is also expensive to produce, and, at 23% of the expense budget, it is the largest association cost. The April 2007 issue of MLA News has side-by-side comparisons of 2006 and 2007 budget information, if you would like to curl up with financial charts for some cozy bedtime reading.

Some of the initiatives being funded in 2007 are:

  • production of additional Medspeak brochures found in your registration materials,
  • redesign of MLANET (You may view the test version of the new design at the MLA Connections booth while you are here),
  • a face-to-face meeting of the Task Force on Research Policy Statement Revision,
  • two webcasts, one of which has already been held, and
  • an upgrade of the association management system.

Ray Naegele is director of financial and administrative services for the association overall and works with section and chapter treasurers regarding their responsibilities. If you have a question at any time about MLA's budget process or finances, you may contact him or the treasurer. My status as treasurer only lasts about two more days; succeeding me for a two-year term as treasurer will be Linda Walton, who just completed her first year on the board.

I have learned much from Ray Naegele, Carla Funk, and other headquarters staff during the past two years and appreciate the privilege of serving as treasurer. If you are looking for me after the annual meeting, I will be relaxing at my retreat in the north Louisiana woods. Thank you.

Next, President Shipman called on Carla Funk to present the executive director's report.

Carla Funk: Good afternoon, everyone, again. On behalf of your MLA staff, I want to add our welcome to Philadelphia. MLA was last here, as many of you know, in 1998 for the association's wonderful Centennial Celebration. Changes that had already begun at that meeting have intensified over the past nine years, and I would like to update you on some of these.

A summary of MLA's activities over the past year is on the back of the National Medical Librarian's Month poster that you all received in your portfolio, and the full annual report is available on MLANET.

Now, MLANET was a fledgling website in 1998. Today, visits to MLANET continue to increase, amounting to three and a half million in 2006—that's visits, not hits. This year, the top five websites visited included the MLA store, jobs, the Medspeak brochures, the Journal of the Medical Library Association, and the Educational Clearinghouse.

After several surveys and focus groups about the site, the MLANET Editorial Board and staff, working with an outside designer, have redesigned the site. As we have all said, and I wish you will go there, the site is available for your comment at the booth. And please stop by, give us your comments. We have tried to incorporate a lot of the things that you have asked for in our surveys of you, including blogs, really simple syndication (RSS) feeds, mouse-overs, a more prominent consumer button, and easier navigation. And we hope to launch the site shortly after the annual meeting, so any input that you can give would be very, very helpful.

As part of this project, we have also redesigned the Educational Clearinghouse to make it easier for instructors and health sciences librarians to use. The Continuing Education Committee is currently reviewing the prototype, and the site should be completed shortly. After the new MLANET is launched, we will begin looking at a content management, association management system for the site to give members the functionality that you have requested.

In 1998, Platform for Change, MLA's educational policy statement, was six years old. At this meeting, we are launching the newly revised educational policy statement, Competencies for Lifelong Learning and Professional Success. There is an executive summary of the statement in your portfolio, and the full policy has been posted to MLANET. I want to add my thanks to the Task Force on Educational Policy Statement Revision for all of their hard work in creating the document. I also want to point out that the document features a 1979 quote from Estelle Brodman that is particularly poignant this year, but, as usual, she was right on target.

Events over the past years also have us focused on disaster recovery. Through your donations to MLA's Medical Library Disaster Relief Fund, we were able to provide funding for library materials, computers, supplies, and travel to those libraries devastated by hurricanes and tornadoes. MLA has also updated its own headquarters disaster recovery plan and now has all financial information and MLANET backed up electronically on a regular basis at several off site locations, in addition to the tape backups that we have made over the years.

In 1998, MEDLIB-L had been in existence for seven years, serving both MLA members and other health sciences librarians. The hosting of MEDLIB-L became a hot topic this year when the State University of New York (SUNY)–Buffalo, which had hosted the site since the beginning, changed its policy, making it impossible for them to continue to do this. The board and staff put the issue out on MEDLIB-L for discussion, and I am happy to say that through the discussion, the Dana Medical Library at the University of Vermont has agreed to host the list on Vermont's website. We want to thank both SUNY–Buffalo for their past support of the list and the University of Vermont, particularly Tina Kussey, who is our sponsor, for their willingness to take this on.

MLA has reached out in many ways this year, to its members, other health sciences librarians, and the public. In 1998, the first Medspeak brochure debuted at the annual meeting. Now, nine years later, with the publication of three new brochures, there are a total of seven Medspeak brochures. The three new ones are on eye disorders, HIV-AIDS, and stroke and are in your portfolios. Also, we are working with members from the Massachusetts Health Sciences Library Network to try to translate the original Medspeak brochure into plain language to make it more accessible to people at lower literacy levels.

In 1997/98, PCI began to work with MLA and continues to help us to promote the value of health sciences librarians and the importance of quality health information. From June 2006 through April 2007, we have reached almost fifty million people through a variety of placements, including AARP, the magazine, Kiplinger's Retirement Report, Nursing Spectrum, Prevention, the Chicago Tribune, News Day, abcnews.go.com, Health News Digest, Computers in Libraries, and usnews.com.

As part of the vital pathways for our hospital librarians project, we have worked with the Colorado Council of Medical Librarians Advocacy Committee to produce the presentation, “Myths and Truths About Library Services”—along with the accompanying brochures, bibliography, and white paper—to help health sciences librarians, especially hospital librarians, advocate on behalf of their libraries. And this tool, I am happy to report, has already been used by both librarians and doctors who are hoping to save their libraries.

We have also developed the Hospital Library Status Notification Form, so that people can report a change in status at their hospital library. To date, we have received over 80 forms, from both MLA members and nonmembers. Of these responses, about 62% were negative—library downsizing, closures, and that kind of thing—while the remaining ones were positive or neutral.

MLA's governmental relations program, very active in 1998, is still active today. Staff continues to work with the Governmental Relations Committee, the Scholarly Publishing Task Force, and the MLA/Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries Joint Legislative Task Force on a number of issues, including the Environmental Protection Agency libraries closings, the Federal Research Public Access Act, the National Institutes of Health Reauthorization Bill, the proposed revisions to section 108 of the Copyright Law, and the National Library of Medicine's fiscal year 2008 funding. MLA continues also to work with the Library Copyright Alliance on a myriad of copyright issues. Please see the Information Issues and Policy area of MLANET for a description of these activities.

Recruitment and retention, both for the profession and for MLA, is becoming increasingly important. In 1998, MLA had 4,930 members, with 536 new members joining the association, the second highest number in recent history. In 2007, the good news is that a record number of new members have joined, 627, but the bad news is that over 800 members have not renewed, due to job changes, retirement, and other factors. MLA membership has dropped to about 4,100 as of January 2007.

Now, the Membership Committee and headquarter's staff continue to work very hard to recruit librarians into the association, and we have developed new recruitment materials, which are available at the booth. And the committee had its third member-phone-a-thon in January that resulted in about forty members. We have also had several academic health sciences libraries support memberships for a number of their librarians who are new to MLA, and we are very, very grateful for this support. Thank you.

During 2007, we will increasingly reach out to nonmembers in this and related professions through direct mailings to promote membership in MLA. Also, please watch for MLA's membership survey that will be sent electronically to all members this summer, and be sure to participate.

MLA continues to work to recruit people into the profession through the work of the Professional Recruitment and Retention Committee and through partnerships with the University of Pittsburgh-WISE+, Leveraging the Power of the Network to Increase the Diversity of Library and Information Science Curriculum, to help the next generation of librarians have easier access to graduate and continuing education.

Also, with Johns Hopkins University and other medical libraries, through Careers in Health Information, Librarianship, and Informatics (CHILI), an Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS)–funded project that is bringing medical librarians, informaticians, and diversity counselors together to increase the number of underrepresented minorities entering health information. As part of the CHILI project, MLA exhibited this year at the Association of American Medical Colleges Minority Career Fair, reaching several hundred high school and college age students interested in health careers. Also, a career article on medical librarians was listed in ExploreHeathCareers.org in 2006, and, in January 2007, staff placed an article on medical librarianship in the Allied Health Professional Network email newsletter distributed by the American Medical Association.

In 1998, MLA's research policy statement was three years old. As you have seen from our research vignettes, MLA will be celebrating a year of research in 2007 with the publication of our newly revised research policy statement developed through the hard work of the Task Force for the Research Policy Statement Revision. Jean has already discussed the Health Information Literacy Project, and there will be an open forum to discuss it more fully this Tuesday, so please, I hope that you come.

Also, since the 2006 annual meeting, composite hospital libraries reports, using data from the 2004–2005 benchmarking database have become available in the members only area. The benchmarking database continues to be used successfully by members to advocate on behalf of their libraries.

Staff also assisted with several surveys via Zoomerang, the web survey tool, including the Academy of Health Information Professionals chapter survey, the MLA meeting site survey, and the final hospital library survey to state and chapter groups. Results of the complete hospital library survey, which is part of the Vital Pathways Project, will be published in 2007. The article will update, in part, the hospital library survey that was published by Pat Wakely and Eloise Foster, AHIP, FMLA, in the Bulletin of the Medical Library Association in 1993. Also, there will be an open forum to discuss the academy survey results on Tuesday.

Staff has also assisted the Fellows in posting fellows' biographies to MLANET, another window into MLA's history. If you haven't seen these, please check them out on the website.

MLA has also provided some new resources for the profession this year. With our copublisher, Neal-Schuman, MLA has published The MLA Guide to Cancer Resources, by MLA member Ruti Volk, and will shortly publish Using Benchmarking, Needs Assessment, Performance Improvements, Outcome Measurement, and Library Standards: A How-To-Do-It Manual, by MLA member Rosalind Dudden, AHIP, FMLA, two very valuable resources.

In 1998, MLA's copyright brochure was about nine years old. Many changes have taken place over the past nine years, and I am happy to say that you received, in your portfolio, information about a valuable new member resource, “Copyright Law and the Health Sciences Librarian,” a complete revision of the 1989 document developed by headquarters staff and an MLA task force chaired by Marianne Comegys. The complete document is located on MLANET, and we hope this expanded version of the copyright brochure will help you through many of your everyday copyright questions.

A new, regular case study feature in the JMLA debuted in July 2006 with a companion blog on MLANET under the stewardship of the JMLA editor Nunzia Giuse and her team. Also, early precursors to the JMLA, the Aesculapian—Mark Funk helped me pronounce that—and the Medical Librarian and History Journal were added to the PubMed central digital archives by NLM, for which we are very grateful. There are now over 9,000 articles available from MLA's journal on PubMed Central, and, over the past 3 months, we have had over 120,000 people access the journal via PubMed Central.

MLA has expanded its relationships with other organizations over the past year in a variety of ways. In September, we took over the management of the Association of Library and Information Science Education (ALISE), an association of library school faculty. Founded in 1915 as the Association of American Library Schools, ALISE provides a forum for library educators to share ideas, to discuss issues, and to seek solutions to common problems. MLA staff have served as allied representatives to ALISE for many years, and, with MLA's over fifty-year interest and work in the area of continuing education, we felt that this was a natural partnership. Kathleen Combs, of headquarters staff, serves as ALISE's executive director.

In the international arena, Jean has already updated you about MLA's new bilateral agreement with the Korean Medical Library Association. We hope that this will be the beginning of a strong partnership between our two groups.

Also, I want to call your attention to the open forum on the Librarians Without Borders e-library training project managed by Lenny Rhine and funded from a grant from Elsevier. Lenny will talk about the courses he has taught and where he has taught them at the open forum, and you can see his poster at the MLA Connection booth. The new and expanded website for the Librarians Without Borders program will be up this summer.

Finally, I would like to recognize some staff members. We have added an additional website assistant in the office to work on both MLANET and ALISE's website. But we also have some milestones to celebrate this year. Susan Talmage, our copy editor, had her second baby, Calvin, this summer. Also, some of us that were here in 1998 are celebrating significant anniversaries this year. This is my fifteenth year at MLA, and Evelyn Shaevel has been with the association for ten years.

And there is another staff member who's celebrating his twenty-fifth anniversary with MLA. Ray, could you please come up to the podium? Twenty-five years is a long time to work at one place, but MLA is very happy to have had you for this amount of time. You have made countless contributions to the association, not only in the area of finance and administration, but also in the development and management of the annual meeting.

You have helped to revolutionize it by adopting new technologies and processes, and we know that there is still more to come. Your good nature and your ability to get along well working with a variety of members over many years has helped the association succeed during very challenging times. I am happy to present to you this token of our appreciation for your hard work, your good ideas, and your good nature. Thank you.

Also, on behalf of staff, I want to thank our wonderful Board of Directors this year, and our gracious and hard working president, Jean Shipman, for a fabulous, fabulous year. You have been a true inspiration to all of us.

That concludes the headquarters report. Staff will be here throughout the meeting to answer questions and provide any other assistance you need. Have a great meeting. Thank you.

President Shipman returned to the podium and moved on to the next order of business, the annual report. In the interest of time, she received the annual reports in a block. The information reports of the appointed officers, officials, councils, the committees, the representatives, chapters, and sections are found in the 2006/07 Annual Report of the Medical Library Association. These reports are posted on MLANET <http://www.mlanet.org/about/annual_report/06_07/> and will remain so throughout this year. They are also available in paper copy upon request from the executive director's office. There being no corrections or objections from members, the reports were filed as presented.

President Shipman then explained that each attendee had received a flyer with a ticket for the MLA/ HINARI drawing in support of MLA's Librarians Without Borders global initiative. The libraries named on the raffle ticket are part of the HINARI program set up by the World Health Organization, together with major publishers. The winning librarian selected at the meeting received an iPod, and the medical library named on the winning ticket got a fully equipped personal computer. Tony McSean of Elsevier, drew the winning ticket, which belonged to Mark Remble with the Medical Center for Pediatric Cardiology and Cardiac Surgery in Ukraine as the winning HINARI library.

President Shipman then closed Business Meeting I.

BUSINESS MEETING II: PRESIDENTIAL INAUGURAL ADDRESS AND MLA '08 INVITATION

Tuesday, May 22

[Research Vignette: Deborah Blecic, AHIP; available at <http://www.mlanet.org/members/e-present/2007/> (members only).]

President Jean Shipman welcomed everyone and called the morning's session to order. She reminded everyone that this session was the conclusion of the association's business for 2006/07. A quorum of voting members was present.

President Shipman then recognized and thanked the retiring MLA board members, Dixie A. Jones, AHIP, and Faith A. Meakin, AHIP, FMLA. They were presented with certificates as tokens of respect and gratitude for work well done. Next, President Shipman expressed her sincere gratitude to retiring Immediate Past-President M.J. Tooey, president of MLA during the 2005/06 association year. She was crowned with a royal tiara symbolizing the many hats she wears and to recognize her “royal role as President and Past-President of MLA” as well as presented with a certificate and plaque.

The new members of the MLA Board of Directors, Gary Freiburger, AHIP, Paula Raimondo, Laurie Thompson, AHIP, and President-elect Mary Ryan, AHIP, FMLA, were then welcomed and introduced. President Shipman proceeded to introduce the incoming president, Mark Funk, AHIP. Incoming president Funk presented Shipman with the presidential cup and congratulated her on an outstanding year on behalf of the association.

Mark Funk, head of collection development at the Samuel J. Wood Library, Weil Cornell Medical College, in New York City, 2007/08 MLA president, delivered the inaugural address.

INAUGURAL ADDRESS

[A Quicktime movie and podcast of this address can be found at <http://www.mlanet.org/members/e-present/2007/> (members only).]

Mark Funk: Why? Why are we here? Why is it that back in January we started making plans to come to this meeting? Why do we disrupt our busy lives, leaving family, friends, and work on our desks to gather in one place? Some of us travel hundreds of miles, many of us travel thousands of miles to get here. It's inconvenient, it's expensive, and only a small portion of MLA business is accomplished here.

Here's another question. Why is it, when we've started making plans to come here, we start asking each other, “Are you going to MLA?” “Yes, I'm going to MLA. Are you going to MLA?” “Yes, I'm going to MLA.” Obviously, this is not MLA. This is the annual meeting of the Medical Library Association. But our overwhelming desire to come together, to reunite with old friends, to meet new friends, to expand our knowledge is so important to us that we have created a verbal shortcut to indicate it.

You, me—us—this mass gathering of like-minded individuals, is why we are here. The sense of community, of connectedness, of associating that we derive from joining MLA and, in particular, attending the annual meeting, is very important to us.

And not just us. It seems that associating is a pretty common thing in the universe. Lots of things associate. This definition from Answers.com shows us that, in addition to people, thoughts, ideas, feelings, even chemical ions, will naturally associate. The need to associate is a basic aspect of nature. People, however, join associations, because they want to work together on a common interest, activity, or purpose.

These common interests and activities are as varied as the human experience. Take a look at the Encyclopedia of Associations. The version for just US national associations is 17 pounds, 4 volumes, and over 4,000 pages. There are additional versions for US regional, state, and local associations and, of course, the international associations. I wanted to get an idea of just how varied the association world is, so I sat down with the Encyclopedia of Associations for an hour. People, there are some weird associations out there.

I want to share with you some of our brethren associations that I discovered. They may sound strange, but their similarities to us are amazing. They have mission statements, annual meetings, awards, and committees. They all exemplify the human need to associate.

Starting off is the Bowling Writers Association of America. I hardly ever think about bowling, and I have to admit, before I found this group, I had never thought about bowling writers, yet here they are. Their name even implies that other countries may have bowling writers associations as well.

Next is the Northern Nut Growers Association—not just, the Nut Growers Association, but the Northern Nut Growers Association. I have to wonder what deep philosophical differences in the past caused the northern group to split off and go off on their own.

Here we have the National Association of Reunion Managers, the official association of professional reunion managers. I've been to reunions that were handled by amateurs. The results were not pretty. The attendees were all old, overweight, and losing their hair. They got drunk and generally made fools of themselves. I've also been to reunions that were handled by professionals. While I admit the results were actually the same, at least they were achieved professionally.

Next is the Association of Professional Piercers. Piercing, while gaining in popularity recently, has always suffered from an image problem. Sound familiar? This association is very active in fighting that image. You can see in their banner they highlight health, safety, and education. The piercers have a scholarship fund; they have a legislation outreach committee and a scholarship committee. Overall, they are not that different from us.

But my favorite strange association that I discovered is the International Sand Collectors Society. “Discovering the world, grain by grain” and proud of it. Like most associations, they have a newsletter. Theirs is cleverly called The Sand Paper. They have an annual meeting. Their upcoming 2007 Sandfest this year will be held in Chesterton, Indiana, home of the Indiana Dunes State Park. This very ambitious group also wants to build a sand museum.

But what really attracted me to this group were their divisions. Not unlike MLA sections, the divisions cater to the particular interests of their members. So I took a look at these divisions, and they divided themselves into different groups. The first group was the scientific group. These are people who are interested in the origin, the geology, and the useful aspects of sand. Another group is the fun group. Although I have to wonder if, perhaps, the sandcastle people split off from the beach people several years ago, because they just couldn't get along.

Then there's the “I never thought of that” category: sand education, historical mortars (which I found out are used not only for archeological research, but also to help restore buildings), and rare sand. Who knew there was rare sand? And finally there is the “Who in the world let these guys in the room?” category.

I had to look up “psychometry,” because I had no idea what it was. It's also called sand reading. In sand reading, a person makes a hand print in a bowl of sand and then a sensitive “reads” the sand and gathers psychic information about the person. I just wonder how these guys get along with the scientists at their division council meetings. I wonder if they're made to sit in the corner during those meetings.

But no matter how strange any of these associations may appear to us, they all serve the same purpose— to get people with similar interests connected to each other. Now, in addition to the incredible variety of associations, there's a long history of associations. MLA comes from an ancient tradition of like-minded people associating together. Let's look at how we got here.

Here we are today, in 2007, all bright and shiny, but we've been here a long time. In 1998, in this very town, we celebrated our centennial. We began in 1898 here in Philadelphia with our founders, William Osler, Margaret Charlton, and George Gould. Being 109 years old sounds impressive, but associations go back much farther, even in the United States. In 1830, the French statesman and author Alexis de Tocqueville toured our relatively new nation. He pointed out that we seemed to be succeeding so well at democracy, because “Americans of all ages, all stations of life, and all types of disposition are forever forming associations.”

Associations evolved from guilds, which were prominent in Europe from the Middle Ages through the Renaissance. Guilds were organized around different professions, the numbers of which increased rapidly as civilization moved from the farm to the cities. Guilds introduced the concept of a lifetime progression in a trade from apprentice, to craftsman, to journeyer, and, finally, to master. This was a case of required mentoring. There were no independent study programs available.

Before the guilds, groups of Roman craftsman known as collegia spread throughout the Roman Empire, starting around the third century BCE. The earliest craftsmen organizations are thought to have originated in India. These organizations, known as shreni, were formed as far back as 3800 BCE. That's a very long time ago, but that just reflects what is known from recorded history. Surely the need to associate, to connect with others of similar interests, must go back farther, to prehistoric times. What were the earliest associations?

To answer this question, I undertook months of archeological and anthropological research to create what I think is an accurate simulation of a very early association. [An animated clip is shown. A caveman says “Good morning. I want to welcome you to the Fourth Annual Cave Dwellers Association meeting. In my keynote address, I want to cover these main points.” The animation ends with him pointing to several lines of cave drawings, each preceded by a bullet.]

Now, two things I want to point out. Who knew that cave men spoke English and with a British accent? I didn't until my computer finished running its simulation. So I've decided to name him Cyril, Cyril the caveman. Also, I want to mention that even in those ancient times, the need to communicate with bullet points was already deeply embedded within our DNA. Even without Microsoft and without power, we see Cyril here making use of a very early point presentation.

This primal need, this urge, this drive to connect with others is the basis of my presidential theme and priorities: “Only Connect!” This phrase is the famous epigraph of E. M. Forster's novel Howard's End, published in 1910. If you're not an English major, you may only be familiar with the movie adaptation starring Emma Thompson and Anthony Hopkins. Oddly, the most famous lines of the book are not used in the movie.

[Male Voice of Cyril the Caveman]: “Only connect! That was the whole of her sermon … Only connect the prose and the passion, and both will be exalted … Live in fragments no longer … Only connect.”

Forster's novel contrasts the Wilcoxes with their superficiality, but unquestionable material power, with the Schlegels, who are sensitive to values but have a very limited ability to change society. It is Margaret Schlegel who is able to connect their separated fragments of prose and passion into a unified whole. I'm using “Only Connect!” to describe a strategy of creating more and tighter connections between the members of our association.

You may recall Carl Sagan, in his award winning Cosmos television series on PBS, explaining that as the universe expands, galaxies move away from each other, becoming increasingly isolated in the vast distances of space. Over the years, the universe of MLA has also expanded into new roles, new functions, and new activities. This is a healthy expansion, and we can't afford to contract our reach. We must always be adapting and expanding our reach.

However, that small, dedicated band of medical librarians who first gathered in Philadelphia over a hundred years ago is vastly different from our current membership. Today, our members are spread out all over the globe, working in specialties and subspecialties unknown to our founders. We thrive in a variety of environments far beyond hospitals and medical schools. But, like galaxies, many of us have become, or are in danger of becoming, isolated from each other. We must stop that from happening.

Take a look around this room. You are surrounded by the leaders of MLA, people who participate in sections, chapters, committees, and task forces. Many of you are officers of these units. Many of you are presenting papers or posters this week. All of us are fortunate enough to be here, attending this meeting. These leaders, however, represent a minority of MLA members. We have a large, untapped resource of both new members and experienced members, who cannot, for various reasons, participate in these traditional association avenues. The vision of my theme, “Only Connect!,” is to implement technology that will allow our members to decrease their isolation, improve communication, make it easier to share knowledge, make it easier to participate, and keep our members connected to each other and to the association.

When I started writing this speech, Time magazine had just named You as their “Person of the Year.” Now be sure to add this great achievement to your resume. It will sound great on your next job interview. Even Time magazine, not exactly the hippest publication around, had taken notice of the changes in the Internet over the past couple of years. They called it “a story about community and collaboration on a scale never seen before.”

New tools such as wikis, blogs, RSS, instant messaging, and podcasts have created a new version of the Internet, dubbed Web 2.0. While some consider Web 2.0 merely hype or a marketing buzzword, it can't be denied that these new tools are allowing the collaborative creation of content despite barriers of time and distance. Web 2.0 has inverted the traditional power structure of the Internet. More and more users are creating content. This is a bottom-up web, not a top-down web. As I mentioned before, some consider Web 2.0 all hype and predict it will turn into another dot com bust. I don't think so. The dot com bust was about businesses running out of money. Web 2.0 is about people, and their need to communicate and participate. That won't run out.

So what are these Web 2.0 tools, and how can MLA use them to allow our members to better connect? You're probably familiar with most of these tools, but you may not have thought about them in terms of what an association can do with them. So I will briefly explain three main tools and how they might work for us.

  • A blog is a user-generated website where entries are made in journal, or diary style, and displayed in reverse chronological order, so the newest postings are right there on top, the first thing you see. There are millions of blogs on the Internet. The most popular blog in the world is Boing Boing, coedited by science fiction author Cory Doctorow. Technology blogs are very popular, as are political blogs, such as The Huffington Post. MLA Board member Scott Plutchak has a very popular blog. MLA has dabbled a little bit in blogs, with the National Program Committees for the last few annual meetings using them as a way to inform people about local activities, restaurants, weather, etc.
  • A wiki is a website that allows visitors to add, remove, edit, and change content. Its main advantage, ease of interaction, makes a wiki an effective tool for mass collaborative authoring. Probably the most famous wiki in the world is Wikipedia. For all its faults and shortcomings, most of us have probably used it.
  • While the origins of the initials are in dispute, most people say that RSS stands for really simple syndication. RSS is a format for automatically delivering regularly changing web content such as blogs, news feeds, wikis, or podcasts. It's a way to find out what's new on a lot of sites without having to visit each one. A site is RSS capable when you see this icon. Here is an example from my own “my Yahoo!” page. I have set up feeds from The New York Times, Reuters, and BBC News. I go to one page; I see the latest updates from several sites.

Why would an MLA unit such as a section, special interest group, chapter, committee, or task force want to use these new technologies? Most of the functions of these units are driven by the expertise and opinions of their members—it's an extended conversation. These new tools can help facilitate that conversation. They have advantages over email and email lists.

A controlled email list means that not everybody can participate in the conversation. Important decisions are often made with limited input. Although a decision may be perfectly valid, nonparticipants may not understand how that decision was derived, and unless the email list is archived, the conversations can be lost or repeated. Blogs and wikis enhance the conversation. They allow more people to participate, even passively, as they get to at least read the conversation, even if they don't want to add to it. By seeing the entire conversation, members can understand how decisions are made, and new participants can see the history of a particular conversation. Openness and participation are vastly increased.

When would a blog be useful for us? Blogs are ideal for conversations or divergent thinking. When a unit wants to have discussions that are far-ranging, deal with new topics, or gather opinions, a blog is ideal. Blog entries are saved so that latecomers to a conversation can catch up on what's already been said.

What about wikis? Generally, wikis are used for convergent thinking. They are ideal for a group to collaborate on best practices, writing standards, creating manuals, or compiling a history. The Hospital Library Section has already set up a wiki. To avoid the well-publicized problems that Wikipedia has had, they have enabled their wiki so that, while anyone can see its content, only registered users can add or edit the content. As a bit of inspiration for you, the Public Library Association has announced plans to start an encyclopedic wiki about public librarianship. Why couldn't we do the same for medical librarianship?

In addition to bringing these social networking tools to the association, I want to revitalize MLANET, make it more than just a passive repository of documents and information. What if we could personalize MLANET so each of us could have a “myMLANET” page? Could we include aspects of a virtual annual meeting on MLANET? Let's also use MLANET as a tool to both welcome new members, and allow them to have meaningful participation in MLA within ten minutes of joining, rather than having to wait ten years. What might this look like?

Let's follow a new member in perhaps the not-too-distant future. He has just joined MLA online, and ten minutes later he received a welcoming email with a link to his own myMLANET page. Here is his myMLANET page after he has uploaded his photograph. Look! It's our friend Cyril, who, after being frozen in a glacier for eons, has been miraculously revived. Yes, his name is Cyril D. Kaufman. You didn't think it would be Cyril D. Caveman, did you? Do you know anybody with the last name of Caveman? No, I didn't think so.

Cyril has turned down a high-paying job from Geico and is now a new librarian, eager to participate in MLA. All of the traditional address and contact information is displayed. You can also see his page has already been filled in with his section and chapter membership, with links to those websites. A brand new librarian, he is not a member of the Academy of Health Information Professionals, but this page will keep track of his status and accumulated academy points.

In addition, other social contacts can also be included, such as a personal web page, instant messaging alias, and del.icio.us. It would also be very easy to add his Flickr, mySpace, and other social network contacts as well. Cyril has also decided to include his resume and both professional and personal tags. These are yet other ways for people to connect with members who have similar interests and expertise. Notice that any of these fields are optional to show or to hide—it's up to Cyril to decide, and of course all of these tags are searchable.

Here is Cyril's myMLANET content page—one page to see all the latest news in which he is interested. He was automatically signed up for several RSS feeds when he joined: the association-wide news, the new-member wiki, the new-member blog, and the blogs for his chapter and sections. He can easily change these feeds as he wants. Rather than wait to be invited, he sees he can connect and participate right away. A new post in the Public Services Section blog catches his eye. A saber-toothed tiger in the stacks! He knows something about these, and he can supply some vital information. Oh, you don't think saber tooth tigers still exist? Well, smarty pants, this library is in Kansas, where we all know that evolution is not allowed, so they still have saber tooth tigers. So there.

Exploring MLANET some more, Cyril discovers that many aspects of the annual meeting are available. He decides to take a quick look at the 2007 annual meeting. Cyril is fond of 2007 because that was the year he was thawed out. Here is a video of Jean Shipman's presidential address. [Brief video is shown.] You can see that beneath Jean's video is a video of my inaugural address. I was going to show you that video, but I consulted with a physicist who warned me that if I attempted to show a video from the future of the speech that I'm giving now that would cause an infinite loop from which the universe would never recover, so you can't see it. Cyril discovers that more recent annual meetings have most of the presentations and posters available on MLANET.

[Brief video is shown.]

These are just some of the possibilities we can create. I am appointing a task force to work on implementing the social networking tools, and I'm also asking the MLANET Editorial Board to begin work on expanding the capabilities of our website. They will be seeking your input, so I hope you have some great ideas to add.

Now I know MLA does not have a wonderful history of getting things done quickly. Things move fast on the Internet, and MLA has to be able to be more nimble than we have been in the past. My hope is that these tools can be implemented relatively quickly. For the task force, for the MLANET Editorial Board, for headquarters staff, and for everyone who will assist in this implementation, I have a simple plea:

Just do it. Let's start now. We can add components incrementally. We don't need long and involved planning before we start to see things happening. Let's avoid the Culture of Perfect. It will never be perfect; it will never be finished. We have to get used to being in perpetual beta mode.

I know that some units of MLA will embrace these new tools. I also know that some will be reluctant. Some units will find these new tools perfect for their needs, while others will find that these tools just don't work for them. But I can guarantee that when the association gives our members these tools, they will be used. Over time, our members will transform themselves and the association. This won't happen in my presidential year, and it probably won't happen in Mary Ryan's presidential year. But within a few years, I think we can look at ourselves and say [zoom sound], “You know what? We're MLA 2.0.”

What will MLA 2.0 be like? I don't know. Even the scenarios I showed you offer only glimpses. So while I don't know what MLA 2.0 will be like, I do know what MLA 2.0 will be about.

It will be about Communication.

It will be about Community.

It will be about Openness.

It will be about Participation.

But most of all, it will be about our Members Connecting, and that, that is why we are here. Thank you.

At the completion of his address, President Funk invited Jane Blumenthal, AHIP, and Lora Thompson, AHIP, cochairs of the 2008 National Program Committee, to give the official thank you for the 2007 annual meeting.

Ms. Blumenthal: Whereas, the 2007 National Program Committee (NPC) has planned and presented an inspiring Medical Library Association program on the revolutions and changes in our profession, including such featured speakers as Arthur Caplan, Henry Lemkau, and Kent Smith;

Whereas, the NPC has sponsored a debate on the need for physical space in the electronic age, has challenged us to move beyond the digital revolution and lead the charge into virtual libraries, and has encouraged us to share and learn from our failures forward; and

Whereas, we look forward to gaining more knowledge from tomorrow's informative and inspiring session on health information literacy;

Whereas, our President Jean Shipman has inspired us all with a challenge to aviate, navigate, and communicate as we soar to new heights in MLA;

Whereas, our exhibitors and partners have worked closely with us to make MLA '07 a revolutionary and inspiring event;

Whereas, Philadelphia itself represents the best of our culture and historic past and is the city where the Liberty Bell rang in another revolution;

Whereas, the 2007 Local Assistance Committee introduced us to the Reading Terminal, Philly cheese steaks, and the best ice cream and chocolate in town, and we have profited from their advice on the best local restaurants, historic sites, and current events;

Whereas, MLA headquarters staff and professional meeting planners have done their usual outstanding jobs with grace and patience to help us all facilitate this 2007 annual meeting;

Therefore, be it resolved that the membership of the Medical Library Association extends its profound appreciation and deep felt thanks to the 2007 National Program Committee, the 2007 Local Assistance Committee, and the entire MLA headquarters staff and professional meeting planners for their stellar efforts in planning this revolutionary, inspiring, and all-around wonderful meeting.

After applause, the membership adopted the motion by acclamation. President Funk thanked members for shopping at the MLA Scholarship Booth and supporting the MLA scholarship program. The names of the winners of the MLA Scholarship Booth raffle were announced.

Next, James Shedlock, AHIP, FMLA, and Christine Frank, AHIP, cochairs of the 2008 Local Assistance Committee, invited members to attend the 2008 meeting, May 16–21, 2008, in Chicago, Illinois. They proceeded to highlight attractions in the host city and urged members to attend next year's meeting.

At the conclusion of the invitation, President Funk recognized Craig Haynes, AHIP, secretary of the MLA Board of Directors, who moved to adjourn the meeting. The motion carried, and the second business session of the 107th annual meeting was officially adjourned.

SECTION PROGRAMMING

Contributed papers were presented in three sessions. This list is organized sequentially by day and then by lead MLA section. Abstracts are available at <http://www.mlanet.org/am/am2007/pdf/07_abstracts.pdf>.

Section Programs I: Sunday, May 20, 4:30 p.m.–6:00 p.m

2007 National Program Committee: Be It Resolved: As Libraries Evolve to Electronic Access Their Need for Physical Space Decreases

Moderator: Laurie L. Thompson, AHIP, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center–Dallas.

Be It Resolved: As Libraries Evolve to Electronic Access Their Need for Physical Space Decreases: Rick Forsman, AHIP, FMLA, Denison Memorial Library, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center–-Denver; Wayne Peay, FMLA, Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library, University of Utah–Salt Lake City; M.J. Tooey, AHIP, Health Sciences and Human Services Library, University of Maryland–Baltimore; and Jane Bridges, AHIP, Health Sciences Library, Memorial Health University Medical Center, Savannah, GA.

Cancer Librarians Section, in conjunction with the Consumer and Patient Health Information Section: Patient as Expert: Revolutionary Changes in Medical Decision Making

Moderator: Gail Hendler, AHIP, Health Sciences Library, Lenox Hill Hospital, New York, NY.

Medical Decision Making for Cancer Patients: A Personal Perspective: Gale G. Hannigan, AHIP, Texas A&M University–Temple.

A Personal Weapon in the War on Chronic Illness: Expert Patients and Their Use of Health Information: Teresa L. Hartman, McGoogan Library of Medicine, University of Nebraska Medical Center–Omaha; and Diane Tobin Johnson, Truman State University, Kirksville, MO.

A Consumer Health Librarian's Cancer Journey: Michele Spatz, Planetree Health Resource Center, Mid-Columbia Medical Center, The Dalles, OR.

Dental Section, in conjunction with Educational Media and Technologies, Health Association Libraries, Medical Library Education, Nursing and Allied Health Resources Sections; Clinical Librarians and Evidence-based Health Care, Mental Health SIGs: Turning Clinical Students into Evidence-based Clinicians: The Medical Library's Role

Moderator: Michael Kronenfeld, AHIP, Learning Resource Center, A. T. Still University of the Health Sciences, Mesa, AZ.

Weaving Evidence-based Medicine into the School of Medicine Curriculum: The Library's Role in Developing Evidence-based Clinicians: Connie Schardt, AHIP, Anne Powers, AHIP, and Megan von Isenburg, Medical Center Library, Duke University, Durham, NC.

Helping a Dental School put the “E” in Evidence-based Dentistry: Lauren A. Maggio and Keven M. Jeffery, Alumni Medical Library, Boston University Medical Center, Boston, MA; and Paul Farsai and Jeffrey P. Hutter, Goldman School of Dental Medicine, Boston University, Boston, MA.

A Full Revolution: 360 Degree Library Services to Clinical Clerkship Students: Kathryn J. Skhal, Hardin Library for the Health Sciences, University of Iowa–Iowa City.

Accessing and Assessing the Evidence: An Online Tool for Teaching Evidence-based Nursing Practice: Mary L. Klem, Health Sciences Library System; and Elizabeth M. LaRue, AHIP, and Peter Draus, School of Nursing, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA.

Assessing the Effectiveness of an Evidence-based Medicine (EBM) Pharmacology Course: Irena Bond, Library and Learning Resources; Alice Gardner, Pharmacology/ Toxicology; and Monina Lahoz, Pharmacy Administration; Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences–Worcester.

History of the Health Sciences Section: They'll All Be Rare Books One Day: Collection Development in Special Collections

Moderator: Patricia Gallagher, AHIP, New York Academy of Medicine–New York.

Culling Your Collection for Quality: John Schleicher, McGoogan Library of Medicine, University of Nebraska Medical Center–Omaha.

Digitization of the Papers of Martin M. Cummings, Director Emeritus of the National Library of Medicine: Cheryl Rae Dee, School of Library and Information Science, University of South Florida–Tampa.

Building a Retrospective Collection in Pharmacy, or Why the Materia Medica Matters: Michael Flannery, Lister Hill Library of the Health Sciences, University of Alabama–Birmingham.

Collection Development, International Dissertations, and the Oakland A's: Diane McKenzie, Health Sciences Library, University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill.

Hospital Libraries Section in conjunction with Collection Development, Technical Services Sections: Information Revolution: Improving the Face of Vendor Relationships/Revolutionizing Our Bonds

Moderators: Michelle Volesko Brewer, Library and Corporate Information Services, J. Harold Johnston Memorial Library, New Jersey Hospital Association– Princeton; and Kerry O'Rourke, AHIP, Library of the Health Sciences, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey–New Brunswick.

Improving the Face of Vendor Relationships/Revolutionizing Our Bonds: Nancy Bulgarelli, Sladen Library, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI; Elizabeth Lorbeer, Lister Hill Library of the Health Sciences, University of Alabama–Birmingham; Linda Spadaccini, Library, Waterbury Hospital, Waterbury, CT; Beth Treaster, Library, Saint Francis Health System, Tulsa, OK; John Mate, Ovid Technologies, New York, NY; Lynn Fortney, EBSCO Information Services, Birmingham, AL; Mark Roux, CyberTools for Libraries, Harvard, MA; and Dan Boutchie, The New England Journal of Medicine, Waltham, MA.

Poster: Pluses and Minuses: The Doody's Core Titles' Experience: Lisa Huang, Central Park Campus Library, Collin County Community College District, McKinney, TX; and Paula Scott, Library, Driscoll Children's Hospital, Corpus Christi, TX.

Public Health/Health Administration Section in conjunction with Federal Libraries, International Cooperation Sections; Outreach SIG: Filling the Void: Creating Access to All from Anywhere

Moderator: Christine Marton, Tom Baker Cancer Centre Knowledge Centre, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada.

What Would John Snow Use Today? PDAs for Public Health Data: Mohammad Al-Ubaydli, IT Insights, The Advisory Board Company, Washington, DC.

Information Access for Rural Health Care Providers: Mark Scully, Northern Wisconsin Area Health Education Center, Wausau, WI; Cynthia M. Reinl, AHIP, Rose Library, Bellin College of Nursing, Green Bay, WI; Suzanne Matthew, Northern Wisconsin Area Health Education Center–Wausau; and Diana H. Robertson, Robertson Research, Woodstock, ON Canada.

Maryland Public Health Practitioners Access and Use: Follow-up Analysis and Training: Lisa Massengale, Kate Oliver, and Claire Twose, William H. Welch Medical Library, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD.

Information Revolution: Arming the Troops: Providing PDA Training to Rural Critical Access Hospitals: Rick Wallace and Jamie Price, Quillen College of Medicine Library, East Tennessee State University–Johnson City.

Relevant Issues Section in conjunction with Leadership and Management Section: Strange Bedfellows: Radical Shifts in the Relationships Between Libraries and Their Partners

Moderator: Allan R. Barclay, AHIP, Ebling Library of the Health Sciences, University of Wisconsin–Madison.

Strange Bedfellows: Radical Shifts in the Relationships Between Libraries and Their Partners: Tony McSean, Elsevier, London, United Kingdom; Tom Richardson, New England Journal of Medicine, Waltham, MA; Joy van Baren, Elsevier, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; and John P. Robarts, Research Library, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.

Veterinary Medical Libraries Section: Identifying Animal Alternatives in Medical Research and Education

Moderator: Gregory Youngen, Veterinary Medicine Library, University of Illinois–Urbana-Champaign.

The Search for Alternatives: Librarians and Animals in Research, Teaching, and Testing: Mary Wood, Center for Animal Alternatives Information, University of California–Davis.

A Veterinary Medical Librarian as an Information Consultant for the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC): The Reality, Possibilities, and Benefits: Gayle Willard, AHIP, Veterinary Medical Library, Kansas State University–Manhattan.

USDA and Searching for Alternatives: I'm From the Government and I'm Here to Help: Tim Allen, Animal Welfare Information Center, US Department of Agriculture, Beltsville, MD.

Invited Speaker Panel

Section Programs II: Monday, May 21, 10:30 a.m.–noon

2007 National Program Committee: Revolutions Under Way: Capture the Moment

Moderator: Susan Lessick, AHIP, Grunigen Medical Library, University of California—Irvine, Orange, CA.

In Librarians We Trust: Building a Partnership with Practitioners for the Benefit of Patients: Angela Dixon, Mary Beth Klofas, Marilyn Rosen, and Julia Sollenberger, AHIP, FMLA, Health Science Libraries and Technologies/Edward G. Miner Library, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY.

Bringing the Mountain to Mohammed: Having a Librarian in the Operating Room Area: Denise P. Hersey, Cushing/Whitney Medical Library, Yale University, New Haven, CT.

A New Liaison Outreach Program: Mobile Reference Services to the School of Public Health: Donghua Tao, Patrick McCarthy, Mary M. Krieger, and Annie Webb, Medical Center Library, Saint Louis University, St. Louis, MO.

Books to Bedside: Cristina Pope, AHIP, Library, SUNY Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY; and Joyce Latham, Onondaga County Public Library System, Syracuse, NY.

Millenials Find Treasure in the Library!: Patricia Mongelia and helen-ann brown, AHIP, Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, New York, NY.

Dental Section in conjunction with Health Association Libraries, Pharmacy and Drug Information, Research Sections; Clinical Librarian and Evidence-based Health Care SIG: The Evidence Base: Evidence at the Point of Care: Where the “Rubber Meets the Road” (Sponsored by StatRef).

Moderator: Michael Kronenfeld, AHIP, Learning Resource Center, A. T. Still University of the Health Sciences, Mesa, AZ.

Evidence at the Point of Care: Where “the Rubber Meets the Road”: Heiko Spallek, Center for Dental Informatics, School of Dental Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA.

Evidence at the Point of Care: Where “the Rubber Meets the Road”: Sarah Spinler, Philadelphia College of Pharmacy, University of the Sciences, Philadelphia, PA.

Federal Libraries Section in conjunction with New Members SIG: Changing with the Times: The Multigenerational Workforce

Moderator: Cynthia Vaughn, AHIP, Preston Medical Library, University of Tennessee Graduate School of Medicine–Knoxville.

Boomer + Nexgen = Library 2.0: Office Sharing as Double Mentorship: Maureen M. Knapp and Mary L. Marix, AHIP, John P. Ische Library, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center–New Orleans.

Uh … Hm … Breaking the Silence: Issues of Concern for New Medical Librarians: Lisa Huang, Collin County Community College District, McKinney, TX.

The Accidental Cohort: Mentorship and Cross-training in an Academic Health Sciences Library: Debra Werner, The John Crerar Library, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL; Nicole Theis-Mahon, Bio-Medical Library, University of Minnesota–Minneapolis; and Robert E. Johnson, Tompkins-McCaw Library for the Health Sciences, Virginia Commonwealth University–Richmond.

Invited Speaker: Shannon D. Jones, Tompkins-McCaw Library for the Health Sciences, Virginia Commonwealth University–Richmond.

Leadership and Management Section in conjunction with Hospital Libraries, Technical Services Sections: Declaring Our Independence: Ringing in New Practices, New Partners, New Spaces

Moderator: James A. Curtis, Savitt Medical Library, University of Nevada School of Medicine–Reno.

The National Institutes of Health Enhanced Public Access Policy at the University of New Mexico: Sparking a Revolutionary Change in Research Culture and Practice: Holly Phillips, AHIP, Erinn Aspinall, AHIP, and Philip Kroth, Health Sciences Informatics Program Development, Health Science Library and Informatics Center, University of New Mexico–Albuquerque.

Planning for Integration of the Digital Library, Clinical Decision Support and Evidence at the Point of Care (EPOC): Linda M. Schwartz and Barbara J. Iobst, AHIP, Library Services, Lehigh Valley Hospital and Health Network, Allentown, PA.

Implementing a Center to Support Creative Problem Solving and Decision Making: Mary Moore, Libraries and Center for Knowledge Management, University of Texas Health Science Center–San Antonio.

A Unique Collaboration Uses Consumer Health Gateway and Go Local Resources to Create a Statewide Women's Health Resources Directory: Sally M. Patrick and T. Elizabeth Workman, Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library; and Kathleen Digre, Center of Excellence in Women's Health, Region 8, School of Medicine; University of Utah–Salt Lake City.

Library and Museum Collaboration: Celebrating a Medical Pioneer on both Sides of the Atlantic!: Ian R. Snowley, Research Library Services, University of London, London, United Kingdom; and Lisa Gensel, University of Delaware–Newark.

Medical Informatics Section, in conjunction with Molecular Biology and Genomics SIG: Revolutionizing Discovery through Text Mining

Moderator: Carrie Iwema, Welch Medical Library, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD.

Natural Language Processing and Knowledge Discovery for the Health and Biological Sciences: “Ask Not What Text Mining Can Do for You …”: K. B. Cohen, Center for Computational Pharmacology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center–Denver.

Medical Library Education Section: Taking Flight with Evidence-based Library and Information Practice: Educational Perspectives

Moderator: Michelynn McKnight, AHIP, School of Library and Information Science, Louisiana State University–Baton Rouge.

Teaching Medical Residents: Impact of Instructor's Background in Medicine and Attitude: Assako N. Holyoke and Mary M. Krieger, Medical Center Library, Saint Louis University, St. Louis, MO.

Qualitative Methods in Health Sciences Library and Information Sciences Research 1996–2006: The State of the Evidence Base: Martha I. Preddie, School of Information and Library Science, University of North Carolina– Chapel Hill.

Designing a Curriculum in Evidence-based Information Practice for Master's Students in Library and Information Science: Joanne Gard Marshall, FMLA, School of Information and Library Science, University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill; and Carol Perryman, Chapel Hill, NC.

Nursing and Allied Health Resources Section, in conjunction with Outreach SIG: A Virtual Revolution: Innovative Trends in Distance Education

Moderator: Ysabel Bertolucci, AHIP, Kaiser Permanente Medical Center, Oakland, CA.

It's a Small World: Changing Techniques to Accommodate Increasing Remote Users: Joanne Rich, Janet G. Schnall, AHIP, and Leilani A. St. Anna, AHIP, Health Sciences Libraries, University of Washington–Seattle.

Embedded: Librarians and Faculty Collaborate to Serve Online Students Through Instructional Courseware: Ladonna C. Guillot, Baton Rouge Nursing Library, Southeastern Louisiana University–Baton Rouge; and Beth Stahr, Sims Memorial Library, Southeastern Louisiana University–Hammond.

One Stop Shopping for Information Literacy Training: Robert E. Johnson, Catharine S. Canevari, Shannon D. Jones, and Virginia L. Stone, Tompkins-McCaw Library for the Health Sciences, Virginia Commonwealth University–Richmond.

Blending Formats: An Innovative Model for Teaching Medical Informatics: Ana D. Cleveland, AHIP, Health Informatics Program, and Jodi L. Philbrick, School of Library and Information Sciences, University of North Texas–Denton.

Teaching PubMed in Cyberspace: The Development of a Self-learning Package: Samuel B. King, Library and Learning Resources, Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences–Manchester, Saint Louis University; and Richard Kaplan and Kathleen MacDonald, Library and Learning Resources, Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences–Boston.

Relevant Issues Section, in conjunction with Chiropractic Libraries Section; Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgendered Health Sciences Librarians SIG: The Politics of Health Information: Keeping the New Barbarians at Bay

Moderator: Allan R. Barclay, AHIP, Ebling Library of the Health Sciences, University of Wisconsin–Madison.

Celebrating the Role of Academic Tenured/Tenure-track Librarians in Disseminating Health and Human Services Research Findings in Politically Sensitive Subject Areas: Paul Blobaum, Library, Governors State University, University Park, IL.

The Politics of Health Information: Keeping the New Barbarians at Bay: David Dillard, Samuel L. Paley Library, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA; Julie Schneider, Ebling Library, University of Wisconsin–Madison; and Susannah Fox, Pew Internet Trust, Washington, DC.

Section Programs III: Monday, May 21, 3:00 p.m.–4:30 p.m

2007 National Program Committee: Beyond the Digital Revolution: Virtual Collaborations, Virtual Partnerships, Virtual Communities

Moderator: Joan Marcotte Gregory, AHIP, Spencer Eccles Health Sciences Library, University of Utah–Salt Lake City.

The Ultimate Virtual Library: Carol Perryman, School of Information and Library Science, University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill; Jennifer E. Watson, Library, University of Tennessee Health Science Center– Memphis; and Guus van den Brekel, Central Medical Library, University Medical Centre, Groningen, Netherlands Antilles.

Creating an Academic “Home” for Clinical and Translational Research: Library Roles: Karen A. Butter, AHIP, and Heidi Schmidt, Library and Center for Knowledge Management, University of California–San Francisco.

Supporting the Independent: Developing New Information Services for Basic Science Researchers: Carrie L. Iwema, Welch Medical Library, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD; and Brian Brown, NIH Library, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD.

Declaring Independence from the Classroom with Moodle: Outcomes of the MLA Continuing Education Institute for Developing Web-based Instruction: Gail Kouame, National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Pacific Northwest Region, University of Washington–Seattle; Michele Spatz, Planetree Health Resource Center, Mid-Columbia Medical Center, The Dalles, OR; Dolores Judkins, AHIP, Library, Oregon Health & Science University– Portland; and Andrea Ryce, National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Pacific Northwest Region, University of Washington–Seattle.

Revolutionizing Interlibrary Loan and Document Delivery to Meet the Needs of the Modern User and the Modern Library: Theodora A. Bakker, Levy Library, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY.

Consumer and Patient Health Information Section, in conjunction with Chiropractic Libraries, Hospital Libraries, Relevant Issues Sections; African American Medical Librarians Alliance, Complementary and Alternative Medicine; Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgendered Health Sciences Librarians; Mental Health SIGs: Power to the People: Serving the Underserved

Moderator: Barbara Bibel, Oakland Public Library, Oakland, CA.

Power to the People: Serving the Underserved: Ysabel R. Bertolucci, AHIP, Health Sciences Library, Kaiser Permanente Medical Center, Oakland, CA; Margaret (Peg) Allen, AHIP, Hmong Health Project, Stratford, WI; Gale Dutcher, Office of Outreach and Special Populations, National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, MD; Andrea Kenyon, Library-Administration, College of Physicians of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA; and Mark Scully, Library, Bay Area Medical Center, Marinette, WI.

Medical Informatics Section: Top Technology Trends: Where Is the Revolution Leading Us Next?

Moderator: Susan Lessick, Grunigen Medical Library, University of California–Irvine, Orange, CA.

Top Technology Trends: Where Is the Revolution Leading Us Next?: Sadie Honey, Library and Center for Knowledge Management, University of California–San Francisco; Wallace McLendon, Health Sciences Library, University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill; Bart Ragon, Library Technology Services and Development, Claude Moore Health Sciences Library, University of Virginia– Charlottesville; Eric Schnell, Information Technology, John A. Prior Health Sciences Library, Ohio State University–Columbus; and Eileen Stanley, AHIP, Roseville, MN.

Medical Library Education Section: New Voices in the Air: Next Generation of Medical Librarianship

Moderator: Joanne Gard Marshall, FMLA, School of Information and Library Sciences, University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill.

A Study on the Adoption of a Web Page Content Assessment Tool: SPAT: Elizabeth La Rue, AHIP, Nursing Informatics, School of Nursing, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA.

Technical Concerns of Using Extended Character Sets in Creating Bilingual Chinese/English Health Information Pathfinders: Marty J. O'Neill II, Health Informatics Program, University of North Texas–Denton.

An Analysis of Evaluation Practice in Library Outreach Efforts from Regional Medical Library Subcontracts, 2001– 2006: Mellanye Lackey, Health Sciences Library, University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill.

Public Services Section, in conjunction with Libraries in Curriculum SIG: Declaring Interdependence: The Evolving Role of the Library in Curriculum Integration

Moderator: Gurpreet Kaur Rana, Taubman Medical Library, University of Michigan–Ann Arbor.

Curriculum Integration of Information Skills into a Problem-based, Group Discussion Course for First-year Medical Students: Terry Henner, Savitt Medical Library, University of Nevada School of Medicine–Reno.

Developing Information Competencies for an Evidence-based Nursing Curriculum: Initial Opportunities and Challenges: Mary L. Klem, Health Sciences Library System, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA.

Measuring MEDLINE Searching Skill Retention in Medical Students: A Curriculum Integrated Instruction Follow-up Study: Melissa L. Just, AHIP, Graff Library, City of Hope, Duarte, CA.

Curriculum Mapping for the Health Sciences: Mapping Association of American Medical Colleges Informatics Objectives to Specific Courses in a Medical Curriculum: Dianne Cmor, Weill Cornell Medical College in Qatar, Doha, Qatar.

Evidence-based Medicine Search: Integrating a Customized, Federated Search Engine into a Medical School Undergraduate Curriculum: David K. Howse, Arizona Health Sciences Library, University of Arizona–Tucson; Paul J. Bracke, Purdue University Libraries, West Lafayette, IN; and Samuel M. Keim, Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Arizona College of Medicine– Tucson.

Research Section, in conjunction with Collection Development Section: Foundations of Health Information Behavior

Moderator: Catherine Burroughs, National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Pacific Northwest Region, University of Washington–Seattle.

How Do Rural Southerners Access Health Information? The View from Allendale, South Carolina: A Descriptive Survey: Nancy C. McKeehan, Systems, and Janice May, Hands on Health-SC, Lillian Trettin, Library, Medical University of South Carolina–Charleston.

Before the Search: Characterizing the Health Concerns and Questions of Low-literacy Individuals: Mary Jo Dorsey, AHIP; and Valerie Monaco, School of Medicine; University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA.

Women's Information-seeking Behavior from Diagnosis to Treatment for Symptomatic Uterine Fibroids: Kalyani Ankem, School of Library and Information Sciences, North Carolina Central University–Durham.

When the People Speak, We Listen: Making Sure the Library of Tomorrow Reflects the Real Needs of Users: Gretchen Arnold, AHIP, Claude Moore Health Sciences Library; Melody M. Cash, Curry School of Education; and Wendy F. Cohn, Department of Public Health Sciences; University of Virginia–Charlottesville.

Site Searching: Using Data Analysis to Improve Site Search Success Rates: MaryBeth Schell, Health Sciences Library, University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill.

Technical Services Section, in conjunction with OCLC SIG: Revolution or Brotherly Love: OCLC, National Library of Medicine, and the Library of Congress

Moderator: Nancy Burford, Medical Sciences Library, Texas A&M University–College Station.

Revolution or Brotherly Love: OCLC, National Library of Medicine, and the Library of Congress: Diane Boehr, Cataloging, National Library of Medicine; Judy Mansfield, Arts and Sciences Cataloging Division, Library of Congress; and Eric Zino, PALINET, OCLC.

Veterinary Medical Libraries Section, in conjunction with Federal Libraries Section: Hunger, Food Security, and Public Health: The Converging Roles of Veterinary and Human Health Sciences

Moderator: Gregory Youngen, Veterinary Medicine Library, University of Illinois–Urbana-Champaign.

Threats to Food Safety and Public Health through Zoonotic Diseases: The Converging Roles of Veterinary and Human Health Sciences: Alan Kelly, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania–Kennett Square.

Section Programs IV: Tuesday, May 22, 3:00 p.m.–4:30 p.m

Collection Development Section, in conjunction with Molecular Biology and Genomics SIG: Evaluative Measures for Resource Quality: Beyond the Impact Factor

Moderator: Lynn Fortney, EBSCO Information Services, Birmingham, AL.

The How and Why of the Impact Factor: Eugene Garfield, AHIP, FMLA, Institute for Scientific Information (now Thomson Scientific), Philadelphia, PA.

Usage Statistics Made Eas(ier): Bob Schufreider, MPS Technologies, Cambridge, MA.

The Promise of Value-based Journal Pricing: Julia K. Kochi, Library and Center for Knowledge Management, University of California–San Francisco.

Invited Speaker Panel

Educational Media and Technologies Section, in conjunction with Public Services and Medical Informatics Sections: 1,776 Uses for Technologies

Moderator: Melissa De Santis, AHIP, Briscoe Library, University of Texas Health Sciences Center–San Antonio.

A Customizable “Mash-Up” for Model and Disease Organisms: Indra N. Sarkar, Patrick Leary, and Cathy N. Norton, MBL/WHOI Library, Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, MA.

Getting More Mileage Out of Extensible Online Tutorials: Keven M. Jeffery, Lauren Maggio, and Mary Blanchard, Alumni Medical Library, Boston University Medical Center, Boston, MA.

Tracking Usage of a Library's Browser Based Toolbars: Sadie L. Honey, Jason Randell, Leslie Kleinberg, and Julia K. Kochi, Library and Center for Knowledge Management, University of California–San Francisco.

Strategies for Podcasting: Transforming Library Instruction to Meet the Needs of Technology-savvy Students: Brenda Faye Green, Jasmine M. Bagay, and Matt Grayson, Health Sciences Library and Biocommunications Center, University of Tennessee Health Science Center– Memphis.

Integrating New Technologies in Library Operations to Improve Staff Knowledge and Customer Service: Theodora A. Bakker, Levy Library, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY.

Federal Libraries Section: Back to Our Revolutionary Roots: Making Change Work

Moderator: Alice Hadley, AHIP, Medical Library, US Naval Hospital, Agana Heights, Guam.

Back to Our Revolutionary Roots: Making Change Work: Emma J. McNamara, US Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC; Rita F. Smith, AHIP, Medical Library, Wilford Hall Medical Center, Lackland, TX; and Ann Russell Potter, AHIP, Library Command Office, Headquarters, US Army Medical Command, Ft. Sam Houston, TX.

History of the Health Sciences, in conjunction with Chiropractic Libraries Section; Complementary and Alternative Medicine SIG: Joining the Revolution: Providing Information in Complementary and Alternative Medicine, Past, Present, and Future

Moderator: Stephen J. Greenberg, National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, MD.

Progression of Alternative to Accepted: A Crooked Mile: Suzanne M. Shultz, Philip A. Hoover, M.D., Wellspan Health at York Hospital, York, PA, and Esther Y. Dell, AHIP, The George T. Harrell Library, Penn State College of Medicine, Hershey, PA.

Dietary Supplement Database for Consumers: Hua F. Chang, Vera W. Hudson, Ying Sun, Dorothy Moore, George Hazard, and Jeanne Goshorn, Specialized Information Services Division, National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD.

Overcoming Skepticism: A Committee of Experts Bridges the Gap between the Library's Complementary and Alternative Medicine Resources and Health Care Professionals: Lilian Hoffecker, AHIP, and Catherine Morton Reiter, AHIP, Denison Memorial Library, University of Colorado and Health Sciences Center–Denver.

Producing and Organising Complementary and Alternative Medicine Evidence for a National Resource: Anelia Boshnakova, NLH Complementary and Alternative Medicine Specialist Library, Royal London Homoeopathic Hospital, London, United Kingdom; Karen Pilkington, University of Wesminster, London, United Kingdom; Janet Richardson, University of Plymouth, Plymouth, United Kingdom; and Peter Fisher, NLH Complementary and Alternative Medicine Specialist Library, Royal London Homoeopathic Hospital, London, United Kingdom.

International Cooperation Section, in conjunction with Public Health/Health Administration, Veterinary Medical Libraries Sections, and Outreach SIG: The Information Revolution Goes Global: Increasing Information Access in Developing Countries

Moderator: Obianuju Mollel, Regional Library Services, Capital Health, Edmonton, AB, Canada.

Experiences in Information Access in Developing Countries: Robert Parker, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Kennett Square, PA.

Sister Libraries as Extended Families: An Innovative Model from the Kaiser Permanente Libraries and the University of Zimbabwe College of Health Sciences Library: Lynn Van Houten, AHIP, Health Sciences Library, Kaiser Permanente Medical Center, Vallejo, CA, and Agnes Chikonzo, College of Health Sciences Library, University of Zimbabwe, Hirare, Zimbabwe.

The Level of Internet Access and Information and Communications Technologies Training for Health Information Workers in Sub-Saharan Africa: Lenny Rhine, Health Science Center Libraries, University of Florida–Gainesville, and Grace Ajuwon, E. Latunde Odeku Medical Library, College of Medicine, University College Hospital, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria.

Invited Speaker Panel.

Leadership and Management Section, in conjunction with Corporate Information Services Section; New Members SIG: Joining the Revolution: Strategies for Marketing Yourself

Moderator: Barbara Epstein, AHIP, Health Sciences Library System, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA.

Joining the Revolution: Strategies for Marketing Yourself: Julie Cohen, Philadelphia, PA.

Pharmacy and Drug Information Section, in conjunction with Corporate Information Services Section: Medicare's Prescription Drug Benefit: Overview, Resources, and a Role for Health Information Professionals (EMBASE.com Lecture)

Moderator: Geraldine Wanserski, Ebling Library, University of Wisconsin–Madison.

Medicare's Prescription Drug Benefit: Overview, Resources, and a Role for Health Information Professionals: Richard Stefanacci, University of the Sciences in Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA.

Research Section, in conjunction with Hospital Libraries Section: Evidence-based Librarianship: How Evidence-based Medicine Foundation Principles Can Be Applied to Medical Library Operations

Moderator: Ruth Fenske, AHIP, Grasselli Library, John Carrol University, University Heights, OH.

Tailored Messaging for Action: Preliminary Findings from Canada's First Knowledge Brokering Trial: Maureen Dobbins, Paula Robeson, Donna Ciliska, and Helen Thomas, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada; and Kara DeCorby, McMaster University, Dundas, ON, Canada.

Formative Comparative Evaluation of Traditional and Recent Quality-content Filters for Answering Clinical Questions with MEDLINE: Yin Aphinyanaphongs and Constantin Aliferis, Department of Biomedical Informatics; and Rebecca N. Jerome, Eskind Biomedical Library, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN.

Hospital Librarians and Evidence-based Health Care: Cleo P. Pappas, AHIP, Library of the Health Sciences, University of Illinois–Chicago.

Gathering the Evidence: Exploring the Value of Information-specialist-in-context Services to Two Clinical Areas: Kate M. Anderson, E. Diane Johnson, AHIP, Deborah H. Ward, AHIP, and MaryEllen C. Sievert, J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library, University of Missouri– Columbia.

Enhancing the Systematic Search Process for Quality Information Retrieval and Delivery: Filters and a Reporting Tool for Librarian Searchers for the Family Physicians Inquiries Network (FPIN): Susan E. Meadows, University of Missouri–Columbia; Kristin Hitchcock, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL; Joan Nashelsky, Library, University of Iowa–Iowa City; Deborah H. Ward, AHIP, J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library, University of Missouri–Columbia.

POSTER SESSIONS

Posters were presented in three sessions, with forty-one posters scheduled for each session. Poster abstracts are available at <http://www.mlanet.org/am/am2007/e-present/poster_abstracts.pdf>. Slides and handouts for many of the posters can be found at <http://www.mlanet.org/am/am2007/e-present/poster_links.html>.

Poster Session I: Sunday, May 20, 2:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m

1) Expenditures for Library Resources in Academic Health Sciences Libraries: A Ten Year Overview: Carlene Drake, University Libraries, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, CA.

2) Assessment of Departmental Journal Requests and Impact on an Academic Health Sciences Library Collection: An Unanticipated Benefit: Anne M. Linton, AHIP, and Kathe S. Obrig, Himmelfarb Health Sciences Library, The George Washington University, Washington, DC.

3) Is Our CD/DVD Collection Worth All This? A Cost-per-use Study of Accompanying Materials: Marie R. Kennedy, Norris Medical Library, University of Southern California–Los Angeles.

4) What More Can We Learn from Statistics? Revolutionizing In-house Statistical Collection through Automation: Charlie S. Lackey, AHIP, Virginia M. Carden, AHIP, and Robert James, Medical Center Library; Ken Mitchell, Perkins Library; Richard A. Peterson, AHIP, and Marcos A. Rodriguez, Medical Center Library; Duke University, Durham, NC.

5) Determining a Core Journal Collection in an Academic Health Sciences Library: Jonathan M. Lord, AHIP, Joy Nuckolls, and Daniel T. Wilson, Health Sciences Library, University of Virginia–Charlottesville.

6) A Small Scale Multi-type Library Consortium for the Purchase of Electronic Resources: Virginia M. Tanji, Annis Lee Adams, and Luree Ohigashi Oasay, Health Sciences Library, John A. Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawaii–Manoa, Honolulu, HI.

7) A Research Study to Develop a Source List of Traditional Chinese Medicine Journals: Naomi C. Broering, AHIP, FMLA, and Gregory A. Chauncey, Library; Stacy Gomes, Academic Administration; Thomas Haines, Administration; and Jack Miller, President's Office; Pacific College of Oriental Medicine, San Diego, CA.

8) Staying Ahead of the Curve … A Continuous and Systematic Approach to Evaluating Electronic Resources: Karen S. Grigg and Charlie S. Lackey, AHIP, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC.

9) The Long Tail: A Usage Analysis of Pre-1993 Print Journal Literature: Jeff Williams, Biomedical Library, University of California–San Diego, La Jolla, CA.

10) Deciding What to Keep in Print: An Essential Step in the Change to an Online Journal Collection: Michele M. Shipley, Angela Dixon, and Christopher Hoolihan, Health Science Libraries and Technologies, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY.

11) Joining the Digital Revolution: The Creation of a Collaborative University-wide Digital Infrastructure from the Ground Up: Danielle P. De Jager-Loftus, Lommen Health Sciences Library, Sanford School of Medicine, University of South Dakota–Vermillion.

12) A Multimedia Digital Repository Needs Assessment and Evaluation: Comparing 2003 and 2007: Sharon Dennis, Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library, University of Utah–Salt Lake City, and Sebastian Uijtdehaage, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California–Los Angeles.

13) Organizing Electronic Resources with a Database-driven Website: Joseph Harzbecker, AHIP, Keven M. Jeffery, Lauren Maggio, David Flynn, and Mary McKeon Blanchard, Alumni Medical Library, Boston University Medical Center, Boston, MA.

14) Anatomy of a Digitization Project: Dissecting the Process: Lisa A. Palmer and Mary E. Piorun, AHIP, Lamar Soutter Library, University of Massachusetts Medical School–Worcester.

15) A Collaborative Venture in Sharing Educational Materials: Richard Usatine and Mary Moore, UTHSCSA Library, University of Texas Health Science Center–San Antonio.

16) Library Website 2.0: Integrating Wiki Software to Enhance Content of Library's Website: Justin C. Robertson, Judy Burnham, AHIP, Jie Li, AHIP, and Ellen N. Sayed, AHIP, Baugh Biomedical Library, University of South Alabama–Mobile.

17) Putting Wikis to Work in Libraries: Nancy T. Lombardo and Allyson Mower, Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library, University of Utah–Salt Lake City.

18) Leveraging Search Data as a Strategic Tool for Developing and Refining Specialized Portal Content: Christopher Ryland, Rebecca N. Jerome, Jerry Zhao, and Qinghua Kou, Eskind Biomedical Library, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN.

19) Creating a Revolution in Hyperbaric Medicine: Virginia R. M. Carden, AHIP, Medical Center Library; Russell S. Koonts, Medical Center Archives; Richard A. Peterson, AHIP, Charlie S. Lackey, and Patricia L. Thibodeau, AHIP, FMLA, Medical Center Library; Duke University, Durham, NC; and Gene W. Hobbs, Rubicon Research Repository, The Rubicon Foundation, Durham, NC.

20) Revolutionizing Consortium Access with Athens Single Sign-on: Robin R. Sewell, Arizona Health Sciences Library, University of Arizona–Tucson.

21) Lawton Digital Archive: Planning and Implementation: Rachel R. Resnick, Polisher Research Institute, Abramson Center for Jewish Life, North Wales, PA.

22) The Informationist and Information Specialist Revolution: Career Pathways for Physicians?: Peggy Schaeffer, School of Information and Library Science, University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill; Patricia L. Thibodeau, AHIP, FMLA, and Robert James, Medical Center Library, Duke University, Durham, NC; Barbara M. Wildemuth and Claudia Gollop, School of Information and Library Science, University of North Carolina– Chapel Hill.

23) Consumer Health Information on Websites of Hospitals: Any Changes after Hurricane Katrina?: Dee Jones, AHIP, Medical Library, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center–Shreveport.

24) Clinical Information Resources: Utilizing New Technologies in Content Delivery: Jenny Pierce and Janice Skica, Health Science Library, School of Medicine, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey–Stratford.

25) Diagnosing Differential Diagnostic Resources in a Pediatric Clerkship: D. Elizabeth Irish, AHIP, and Enid M. Geyer, AHIP, Schaffer Library of Health Sciences, Albany Medical College, Albany, NY, and Richard H. Sills, Department of Pediatrics, Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY.

26) The Journey Project: Monica Leisey and Jean P. Shipman, AHIP, Tompkins-McCaw Library, Virginia Commonwealth University–Richmond.

27) Pathways to Partnerships: A Pilot Pediatric Information Prescription Program: Angela Dixon, Mary Beth Klofas, Marilyn Rosen, and Julia Sollenberger, AHIP, FMLA, Health Science Libraries and Technologies/Edward G. Miner Library, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY.

28) Jumping into Battle: Bringing the Information Revolution to the Bedside: Cheri Smith, Harrison Medical Library, Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, Baltimore, MD.

29) Morning Report and All That: New Services to a Child Health Department: Kate M. Anderson, MaryEllen C. Sievert, E. Diane Johnson, AHIP, and Deborah H. Ward, AHIP, J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library, University of Missouri–Columbia.

30) Clinical Medical Librarian Services for Nurses: Clista Clanton, AHIP, and Ellen N. Sayed, AHIP, Baugh Biomedical Library, University of South Alabama–Mobile.

31) Broaden Your Reach: Instant Messaging from the Reference Desk: It's Worth It: Dan Kipnis and Gary Kaplan, Scott Memorial Library, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA.

32) Putting Library Resources on Our Users' Desktops: Sadie Honey, Leslie Kleinberg, Jason Randell, and Julia K. Kochi, Library and Center for Knowledge Management, University of California–San Francisco.

33) What's in a Name? Reference Services in Academic Health Sciences Libraries: Jodi L. Philbrick and Ana D. Cleveland, AHIP, Health Informatics Program, School of Library and Information Sciences, University of North Texas–Denton.

34) Creating and Implementing a Database to Revolutionize the Management of Electronic Document Delivery Requests: Karen L. Hanus and Alfred Kraemer, MCW Libraries, Medical College of Wisconsin–Milwaukee.

35) Using a Wiki for the Reference Desk: Rebecca Raszewski, Hahnemann Library, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA.

36) The Next Generation of Academic Health Sciences Reference Librarians: Jodi L. Philbrick and Ana D. Cleveland, AHIP, Health Informatics Program, School of Library and Information Sciences, University of North Texas–Denton.

37) The Geography of Virtual Reference Services in Academic Health Sciences Libraries: Jodi L. Philbrick and Ana D. Cleveland, AHIP, Health Informatics Program, School of Library and Information Sciences, University of North Texas–Denton.

38) Revolution at the Library Service Desk: Beverly Murphy, AHIP, Richard A. Peterson, AHIP, Hattie Vines, AHIP, Megan von Isenburg, Elizabeth Berney, Robert James, and Marcos A. Rodriguez, Medical Center Library, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC.

39) The More Things Change, the More They Remain the Same: Qualitative and Comparative Analysis of Reported Library Issues from 1985–1986 and 2005–2006: Rebecca McKay, AHIP, and Christine Foster, AHIP, Medical Sciences Library, Texas A&M University–College Station.

40) Ask Sassy Systems …: Angela D. Anderson and Mararia K. Adams, Medical Library, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center–Shreveport.

41) Harnessing the Power of E-journals: Designing, Implementing, and Evaluating an Electronic Tables of Contents (ETOCS) Program for Clinicians—2001–2007, a Six-year Project Review and Analysis: Susan M. Robishaw, AHIP, and Claire A. Huntington, Health Sciences Libraries, Geisinger Health System, Danville, PA.

Poster Session II: Monday, May 21, 2:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m

1) Setting a Firm Foundation: Developing a Course in Global Health Informatics for a Master's Program in Global Health: Marcus A. Banks, AHIP, and Karen Brewer, AHIP, FMLA, Frederick L. Ehrman Medical Library, School of Medicine; and Van B. Afes, Waldmann Dental Library, College of Dentistry; New York University– New York.

2) Looking Around to Look Ahead: A Review of Medical Library Online Tutorials: Rozalynd P. McConnaughy, Allison LoCicero, Briget Livingston, and Steven Wilson, School of Medicine Library, University of South Carolina–Columbia.

3) “Sneaking In” Library Instruction: Using a “Non-Library” Instructional Video to Demonstrate How to Find Books and Journals in the Health Sciences Library: Sarah McCord, AHIP, Health Sciences Library; and Jonathan K. Reynolds, College of Pharmacy; Washington State University–Pullman.

4) Summer in the City: Developing Health Information Literacy Skills of Minority College Students: Nancy R. Glassman, AHIP, Racheline G. Habousha, AHIP, Karen Laul, Leigh M. Mihlrad, Aurelia Minuti, Rachel Schwartz, and Karen Sorensen, D. Samuel Gottesman Library, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY.

5) What's the Current Status of Nursing Informatics Education?: Ana D. Cleveland, AHIP, Health Informatics Program; Jodi L. Philbrick, Xuequn Pan, and Michael Robertson; School of Library and Information Sciences, University of North Texas–Denton.

6) Give Us Liberty! A Health Sciences Library Carves a New Path in Professional Medical Education: Valeri Craigle, Health Sciences Library, University of Southern Nevada, South Jordan, UT.

7) Where the Rubber Meets the Road: Integrating/Embedding Library Instruction Services into an Innovative Health Sciences Summer Course: Mary M. Henning, Libraries, University of Wyoming–Laramie.

8) Can a Health Sciences Librarian in a Pediatrics Department Increase In-training Exam Scores?: Sarah Towner Wright, Department of Pediatrics/Health Sciences Library, University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill.

9) Going the Distance with Moodle: Outcomes of the MLA Continuing Education Institute for Developing Web-based Instruction: Andrea Ryce, National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Pacific Northwest Region, University of Washington–Seattle; Dolores Judkins, AHIP, Oregon Health & Science University–Portland; Gail Kouame, National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Pacific Northwest Region, University of Washington– Seattle; and Michele Spatz, Planetree Health Resource Center, Mid-Columbia Medical Center, The Dalles, OR.

10) Integration of Simulators into Clinical Skills Education for Medical Students: Brenda L. Seago, AHIP, School of Medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University–Richmond.

11) A Pocketful of PDAs: How Much Instruction Do Medical Students Need?: Rose Guerrieri, Kent State University-Trumbull Campus, Warren, OH.

13) Tablet PC Use Revolutionizes Teaching and Student Learning: Jeanne M. Le Ber and Julie Quilter, Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library, University of Utah– Salt Lake City.

14) Three-year Summative Analysis of First-year Medical Student Library Instruction: Brenda Faye Green, Jasmine M. Bagay, and Richard Nollan, AHIP, Health Sciences Library and Biocommunications Center, University of Tennessee Health Science Center–Memphis.

15) Lesson Learned: The Librarian-Faculty Partnership in Informatics for Health Care: Lin Wu, Health Sciences Library and Biocommunications Center, and Cynthia K. Russell, College of Nursing; University of Tennessee–Memphis.

16) A Librarian and a Nurse Educator Team to Teach and Assess Evidenced-based Practice Searching Skills to Nursing Students: Danielle M. Carlock, AHIP, Polytechnic Campus Library, and Jonna Anderson, College of Nursing and Healthcare Innovation, Arizona State University–Mesa.

17) The Response-shift Bias: Pretest/Posttest versus Pretest/Retrospective Pretest Evaluation of Information Literacy Training Programs: Marie T. Ascher, AHIP, and Diana J. Cunningham, AHIP, Health Sciences Library, New York Medical College–Valhalla.

18) A Quiet Revolution: Evaluating a Personal Librarian Program to Better Meet the Evolving Information Needs of Students: Judy M. Spak, AHIP, and Janis Glover, AHIP, Cushing/Whitney Medical Library, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT.

19) Changing the Way We Do Distance Education: Experiences with the Access Grid and Personal Interface Grid to Deliver Online Seminars: Sharon Dennis, Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library, University of Utah–Salt Lake City.

20) Information Revolution: Getting the Militia Battle-ready: Improving the Information Skills of Medical Residents: Rick Wallace, Quillen College of Medicine Library, East Tennessee State University–Johnson City.

21) “Open Access” Curriculum Study: Can We Improve the Way Medical Students Learn?: Anne Powers, AHIP, Connie Schardt, AHIP, Megan von Isenburg, Patricia L. Thibodeau, AHIP, FMLA, and Brandi Tuttle, Medical Center Library, Duke University, Durham, NC.

22) Moving to Moodle: Creating Online Instruction from an MLA Continuing Education Class: Marty Magee, NN/ LM Nebraska, McGoogan Library of Medicine, University of Nebraska Medical Center–Omaha.

23) Searching Skills, Information Resource Use, and Clerkship Grades: Is There a Relationship?: Melissa L. Just, AHIP, Graff Library, City of Hope, Duarte, CA.

24) Are We There Yet? Arriving at a Thorough Literature Review: Esther Y. Dell, AHIP, Penn State College of Medicine, Hershey, PA, and Suzanne M. Shultz and Philip A. Hoover, Library, Wellspan Health at York Hospital, York, PA.

25) Library Partners with MedHome Portal to Create Change: Jeanne M. Le Ber, Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library, University of Utah–Salt Lake City; Alfred N. Romeo, Utah Integrated Services Project, Utah Department of Health–Salt Lake City; and Chuck Norlin, Division of General Pediatrics, School of Medicine, and Susan Roberts, Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library, University of Utah–Salt Lake City.

26) Analysis of the Reporting of Search Strategies in Cochrane Systematic Reviews: Daphne Plaut, AHIP, Kaiser Permanente Center for Health Research, Portland, OR; Kathleen A. McGraw, Health Science Library, University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill; Margaret J. Anderson, Public Health Library, University of Texas Health Science Center–Houston; Loan Nguyen, Education Resource Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX; Kay E. Wellik, AHIP, Library Services, Mayo Clinic Arizona, Scottsdale, AZ; and Adriana Yoshii, AHIP, Health Science Center Libraries, University of Florida–Jacksonville.

27) The Use of Ground Rules to Facilitate Interactions between Principal Investigators and Librarians when Searching for Alternatives to Laboratory Animals: Ann R. Viera, Pendergrass AG-VET MED Library, University of Tennessee–Knoxville.

28) Analyzing Similarity Functions in Ovid MEDLINE and PubMed: Rebecca S. Graves, AHIP, J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library, and Gabriel M. Peterson, University of Missouri–Columbia.

29) Reduction Search Strategies for Animal Research: Melissa A. Ratajeski, Health Sciences Library System, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA.

30) Magnet Again! The Library's Role in Collaboration to Maintain Magnet Status: Barbara J. Iobst, AHIP, and Linda M. Schwartz, Library Services, Lehigh Valley Hospital and Health Network, Allentown, PA.

31) The Literature Search Process for an Integrative Review: Joanne Rich and Amy L. Harper, Health Sciences Library, and Elizabeth J. Bridges, Biobehavioral Nursing, School of Nursing, University of Washington– Seattle.

32) ReleMed: A Sentence-level Search Engine for MEDLINE: Mir S. Siadaty, Department of Public Health Sciences, School of Medicine, University of Virginia– Charlottesville; and Karen K. Knight and Andrea S. Horne, Claude Moore Health Sciences Library, University of Virginia Health System–Charlottesville.

33) Poultices, Potions, and Prayers: Cynthia R. Kahn, AHIP, Himmelfarb Library, George Washington University Medical Center, Washington, DC, and Gail Kouame, National Network of Libraries of Medicine, University of Washington–Seattle.

34) MLA's Oral History Project: Celebrating Thirty Years of Health Sciences Library Visionaries: Joan Stoddart, AHIP, Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library, University of Utah–Salt Lake City, and Marlyse H. MacDonald, North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics–Durham.

35) Bibliotherapy: Patient Libraries/Reading Programs. One Component of the Moral Treatment Revolution in Mental Health Care: Ruthann Gildea, AHIP, Library Services, Isaac Ray Library, Butler Hospital, Providence, RI, and Leonard Levin, AHIP, Lamar Soutter Library, University of Massachusetts Medical School–Worcester.

36) Reviving the Past: Creating an Institutional Oral History Collection: Colleen M. Kenefick, AHIP, and Susan E. Werner, Health Sciences Library, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY.

37) Ringing in a New Service: The Library as a Partner in Publishing: Holly K. Grossetta Nardini, Denise P. Hersey, and Lynn H. Sette, Cushing/Whitney Medical Library, Yale University, New Haven, CT.

38) Publishing Patterns in Four Veterinary Medicine Journals: Jill Crawley-Low, Veterinary Medicine Library, University of Saskatchewan–Saskatoon, Canada.

39) Journal of Neuro-Ophthalmology: Librarian on Board: Gale A. Oren, AHIP, Kellogg Eye Center, University of Michigan–Ann Arbor.

40) Fostering Professional Development and Critical Appraisal for Journal Peer Reviewers: Rebecca N. Jerome, Nila A. Sathe, Taneya Y. Koonce, and Nunzia B. Giuse, AHIP, FMLA, Eskind Biomedical Library, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN.

41) The Open Access Revolution: Patterns in Faculty Free Full-text Publications: K.T.L. Vaughan, Bioinformatics and Pharmacy; Carol G. Jenkins, AHIP, FMLA, Health Sciences Library, University of North Carolina– Chapel Hill; Virginia M. Carden, AHIP, and Patricia L. Thibodeau, AHIP, FMLA, Library Services and Archives, Medical Center Library, Duke University, Durham, NC; and Stefanie E. Warlick, Health Sciences and Human Services Library, University of Maryland–Baltimore.

Poster Session III: Tuesday, May 22, 1:00 p.m.–2:00 p.m

1) Collaborating to Start an Online Nursing Journal Club: Rose Campbell, AHIP, Library; Sherrie Schuldheis, Nursing Research; and Christine Valdez; Portland VA Medical Center, Portland, OR.

2) Assessment of Information Needs for Speech Language Pathologists and Audiologists: Ruiling Guo, AHIP, Idaho Health Sciences Library; Janene Willer, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, and Education of the Deaf; and Barbara A. Bain, College of Health Professions; Idaho State University–Pocatello.

3) A Tiered Approach to Providing Evidence for Standardized Care Pathways and Order Sets: Taneya Y. Koonce, Eskind Biomedical Library; Shannon Potter, Institutional Review Board; Jack M. Starmer, Biomedical Informatics, Department of Biomedical Informatics; and Annette M. Williams and Nunzia B. Giuse, AHIP, FMLA, Eskind Biomedical Library; Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN.

4) Project St. Hope: An HIV/AIDS Community Information Outreach Project: Jeffrey T. Huber, School of Library and Information Studies, Texas Woman's University–Houston, and Beatriz G. Varman, Houston Academy of Medicine-Texas Medical Center Library, Houston, TX.

5) Supporting Evidence-based Medicine in an Academic Health System: A Unique Partnership between the Center for Evidence-based Practice and the Biomedical Library: Gretchen Kuntz, Biomedical Library; Anne K. Seymour, Health Sciences Libraries, University of Pennsylvania–Philadelphia; and Craig A. Umscheid and Kendal Williams, Center for Evidence-based Practice, University of Pennsylvania Health System–Philadelphia.

6) Exploring the Information Needs of Life Science Researchers: Brenda Graves-Blevins, MU Libraries; Kate M. Anderson and MaryEllen C. Sievert, J. Otto Lottes Library Health Sciences Library; University of Missouri–Columbia.

7) Vanishing Act: The Disappearance of Web Resources Cited in the Health Care Management Literature: Catherine E. Wagner, Meseret D. Gebremichael, and Mary K. Taylor, AHIP, Morris Library, Southern Illinois University– Carbondale.

8) An Online Evidence-based Medicine (EBM) Learning Module for Pharmacy Residents of Washington State: The Role of the Information Professional: Joanne Rich, Health Sciences Libraries, University of Washington–Seattle; Nancy Lee, HMC Pharmacy Services; and Alvin Goo, HMC Ambulatory Pharmacy; Harborview Medical Center, Seattle, WA.

9) Evidence Supporting Evidence-based Thinking Across Disciplines: Carol Tierney and Eduardo Mendez, Evidence Based Practice, Health Policy and Clinical Effectiveness; Barbarie Hill, AHIP, Pratt Library; and Jerry Edens, Respiratory Therapy; Cincinnati Children's Hospital, Cincinnati, OH.

10) Design and Development of an Evidence Database for Social Care of the Aged: Elizabeth Taylor, Library, and Peri Rosenfeld, Researcher, New York Academy of Medicine–New York.

11) Thinking Outside the “Stacks”: Finding New Opportunities to Evolve Medical Librarianship: Jeffery Loo and Lonelyss Charles, School of Information and Library Science, University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill.

12) Defining the Global Health Librarian: Lonelyss Charles, School of Information and Library Science, University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill, and Patricia L. Thibodeau, AHIP, FMLA, Duke University Medical Center Library, Duke University, Durham, NC.

13) A CHILI Recipe Contest: Careers in Health Information, Librarianship, and Informatics: Ellis Beteck, Louis Stokes Health Sciences Library, Howard University, Washington, DC; Brenda Faye Green, Health Sciences Library, University of Tennessee Health Science Center–Memphis; Charles J. Greenberg, Cushing/Whitney Medical Library, Yale University, New Haven, CT; Deborah D. Halsted, HAM-TMC Library, Houston Academy of Medicine-Texas Medical Center, Houston, TX; Deborah Knight-Kerr, Human Resource Community and Education Projects, Johns Hopkins Health System, Baltimore, MD; Jeanne Larsen, Dahlgren Memorial Library, Georgetown University, Washington, DC; Lisa Massengale, Welch Medical Library, Johns Hopkins University, New Haven, CT; Neville D. Prendergast, Bernard Becker Medical Library, Washington University, St. Louis, MO; Nancy K. Roderer, AHIP, Welch Medical Library, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD; and Stephanie Weldon, AHIP, Denison Memorial Library, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center–Denver.

16) Who Are We? Creating a New and Cohesive Graphic Identity for the Library: Michelle Frisque, Linda O'Dwyer, and James Shedlock, AHIP, FMLA, Galter Health Sciences Library, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL.

17) The Changing Role of the Health Sciences Librarian: Supporting Nursing Magnet Initiatives: Pamela White, Health Science Libraries and Technologies, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY.

18) Hospital Library Advocacy in the MidContinental Region: Barbara B. Jones, Health Science Library, University of Missouri–Columbia.

19) Space: Now You Have It … Now You Don't!: Dave A. Piper, AHIP, Gary A. Freiburger, AHIP, and Mary L. Holcomb, Arizona Health Sciences Library–Tucson and Phoenix, University of Arizona–Tucson.

20) Changing with the Times? Library Associations and New Librarians: Megan von Isenburg, Medical Center Library, Duke University, Durham, NC, and Dan Kipnis and Rebecca Pernell, Scott Memorial Library, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA.

21) Evidence-based Practice: A Revolution in Library Project Management: Carol Perryman, School of Information and Library Science, University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill, and Patricia L. Thibodeau, AHIP, FMLA, Medical Center Library, Duke University, Durham, NC.

22) An Advocacy Service for Hospital Librarians: Shirley Gronholm, AHIP, Health Science Libraries, Hartford Hospital, Hartford, CT; Mark Goldstein, National Network of Libraries of Medicine, New England Region, Shrewsbury, MA; Margo Coletti, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA; Denise Corless, Youngdahl Library, Caritas Norwood Hospital, Norwood, MA; Barbara Davis, Carnegie Abbey Health Sciences Library, Newport Hospital, Newport, RI; Anne Fladger, AHIP, Medical Library, Brigham & Women's Hospital, Boston, MA; Mimi Guessferd, Medical Library, Parkland Medical Center, Derry, NH; Sheila Hayes, AHIP, Portsmouth Regional Hospital, Portsmouth, NH; Claire LaForce, Health Sciences Library, Rutland Regional Medical Center, Rutland, VT; and Emily Scribner, Ben Franklin Center Library, Franklin Memorial Hospital, Farmington, ME.

23) Disaster Planning: The Keystone of a Business Continuity Plan for Your Library: Daniel T. Wilson and Susan S. Yowell, Claude Moore Health Sciences Library, University of Virginia–Charlottesville.

24) Assessing the Future: Developing Information Technology Skills for New Staff Roles in Academic Medical Libraries: Richard A. Peterson, AHIP, Medical Center Library, Duke University, Durham, NC; Carol Perryman, University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill; Robert James and Charlie S. Lackey, Medical Center Library, Duke University, Durham, NC.

25) Living the Brand, the Fish! Way: Alice Witkowski, AHIP, and Nancy Stimson, Biomedical Library, University of California–San Diego, La Jolla, CA.

26) A Tribal Librarians' Health Information Conference: Jeanette L. Ryan, AHIP, Patricia A. Auflick, and Gary A. Freiburger, AHIP, Arizona Health Sciences Library, University of Arizona–Tucson and Phoenix.

27) Let No Physician be Left Behind: Bringing Information to Rural Health Care: Deborah H. Ward, AHIP, J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library, University of Missouri–Columbia, and Susan Centner, Ted Smith Resource Center, Mid-Missouri Area Health Education Center–Rolla.

28) Power to the People: The Patient Information Hotline: Patricia May, Eleanor B. Silverman, AHIP, Madeleine M. Taylor, and Charles L. Jankowski, Health Sciences Library, St. Joseph's Healthcare System, Paterson, NJ.

29) Transforming Patients to Experts: Information Guides for Cancer Patients and Families: Ruti Volk, Patient Education Resource Center, Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Michigan–Ann Arbor.

30) Information Needs of Community Dental Professionals in North Carolina: Tina Crenshaw, Health Sciences Library; Rachel Wilfert, Training and Education, NC Center for Public Health Preparedness, NC Institute for Public Health; Diana McDuffee and MaryBeth Schell, AHEC Digital Library, Area Health Education Center Information and Library System Office, Health Sciences Library; University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill.

31) Evaluating an Alumni Outreach Program: Steven Hunt, Michelle Frisque, Kurt Munson, Linda O'Dwyer, and James Shedlock, AHIP, FMLA, Galter Health Sciences Library, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL.

32) Peer Power PLUS 2006 Online Symposium: Peer Tutoring, Online Health Resources, and Community Outreach: Javier Jiménez, Sara Reibman, Lucy Hansen, and Ann Vickman, Biblioteca Las Américas, South Texas Indepedent School District–Mercedes; Frederick B. Wood, Office of Health Information Programs Development, National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, MD; and Cindy Olney, C.O. Evaluation Consulting, Greensboro, NC.

33) ¡VIVA! Peer Tutor Summer Institutes: Sara Reibman, Lucy Hansen, Ann Vickman, Javier Jiménez, Biblioteca Las Américas, South Texas Indepedent School District–Mercedes; Frederick B. Wood, Office of Health Information Programs Development, National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, MD; and Cindy Olney, C.O. Evaluation Consulting, Greensboro, NC.

34) New Partnerships for a New Generation: Mary E. Piorun, Barbara Ingrassia, AHIP, Sally Gore, and Judith Nordberg, Lamar Soutter Library, UMass Medical School, Worcester, MA.

35) Regional Partners Strengthen Outreach: Alexa A. Mayo, AHIP, Patricia Hinegardner, AHIP, and M.J. Tooey, AHIP, Health Sciences and Human Services Library, University of Maryland–Baltimore.

36) Changing the Search Behavior of a Public Health Workforce. Descriptive Quantitative Analysis of an Arkansas Public Health Virtual Library Project: Susan C. Steelman, Mary L. Ryan, AHIP, FMLA, and Abby E. Holt, UAMS Library, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences–Little Rock.

37) Make A Difference! A Collaborative Effort Among Libraries and Hospitals: David C. Stewart, AHIP, and Rochelle Kramer, AHIP, Coy C. Carpenter Library, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC.

38) Using a Logic Model to Plan and Implement a Liaison Outreach Program of Mobile Reference Services: Donghua Tao, Patrick McCarthy, Mary Krieger, and Annie Webb, Medical Center Library, Saint Louis University, St. Louis, MO.

39) Connecting Congregations: Access to Online Health Information for Parish Nurses: Kelly K. Near and Bart Ragon, Claude Moore Health Sciences Library; Lisa M. Zerull and Sarah Farrell, Academic Programs, School of Nursing; University of Virginia–Charlottesville.

40) Qualitative Evidence Guiding Modification of a Local Health Department Library Program: Barbara L. Folb and Ahlam Saleh, Health Sciences Library System, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA.

41) Information Revolution: Mustering the Militia: Collaborating with Public Libraries to Provide Consumer Health Information Services to Seventeen Rural Tennessee Counties: Nakia Carter and Rick Wallace, AHIP, Quillen College of Medicine Library, East Tennessee State University–Johnson City.

OTHER MEETINGS AND EVENTS

Pre-meeting activities

The MLA Board of Directors held a day-long meeting on Friday, May 18. The MLA Credentialing Committee met Friday evening. On Saturday, May 19, the following MLA groups met: Nominating Committee, Books Panel Committee, and 2008 National Program Committee. In addition, Chapter Council, Section Council, and section program planners (MLA '08) held meetings.

Sunday, May 20

Early Sunday morning, the Research Section had a business meeting. The Outreach, Department of Veteran's Affairs, and Library Marketing Special Interest Groups (SIGs) met, and these informal meetings took place: CyberTools for Libraries User Group, Go Local Discussion Group, and Veterinary Medical Libraries Section Executive Committee Meeting. Later that morning, the Research Section had an informal meeting.

MLA sections that met in the afternoon included Collection Development (executive committee) and Consumer and Patient Health Information (executive board meeting). The Department of the Army Medical Command Libraries and Molecular Biology and Genomics SIGs held meetings. The DOCLINE Users Group, Scholarly Publishing Task Force, and Fellows of MLA also met. There was also a marketing seminar, “Coping with Change: Reaching Your Library's Users.”

Monday, May 21

On Monday morning, the following MLA units met: 2009 National Program Committee, Awards Committee, chapter treasurers, Governmental Relations Committee, JMLA Editorial Board, Membership Committee, MLANET Editorial Board, Section Continuing Education Chairs, and Document and Medical Education Subcommittees of the Task Force on Vital Pathways for Hospital Librarians. At the same time, these sections held meetings: Cancer Librarians, Educational Media and Technologies, Hospital Libraries (Executive Board Meeting #1), Nursing and Allied Health Resources (Executive Board), and Pharmacy and Drug Information, and these SIGs met: African American Medical Librarians Alliance and Osteopathic Libraries. These informal meetings were held: Funding Mechanisms for Open Access Publishing and Radiology Library Advisory Board 2007.

In the afternoon, twelve sections met: Collection Development, Consumer and Patient Health Information, Corporate Information Services, Dental, Federal Libraries, Health Association Libraries, Medical Library Education, Nursing and Allied Health Resources, Public Health/Health Administration, Public Services, Technical Services #1, and Veterinary Medical Libraries. SIGs meeting at this time were: Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgendered Health Sciences Librarians; New Members; and OCLC. The Librarians without Borders Task Force also met, and the Central Group on Educational Affairs (CGEA) and the Electronic Fund Transfer System (EFTS) Users' Group held informal meetings. During the early evening, these SIGs held meetings: Clinical Librarians and Evidence-based Health Care, Libraries in Curriculum, Pediatric Libraries, and Vision Science.

Tuesday, May 22

Early Tuesday morning, several MLA units met: Benchmarking Network Editorial Board, Bylaws Committee, chapter continuing education chairs, Donald A. B. Lindberg Research Fellowship Jury, and Professional Recruitment and Retention Committee. These sections also had meetings: Hospital Libraries (Committee Meetings), Leadership and Management (Executive Board), and Medical Informatics. The Voyager SIG also met, and the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Middle Atlantic Region, Regional Medical Libraries consultants held an informal meeting.

In the afternoon, these MLA units met: Benchmarking Chapter Liaisons, section treasurers, and Task Force on Vital Pathways for Hospital Librarians Steering Committee. A number of sections also met: Chiropractic Libraries, History of the Health Sciences, Hospital Libraries (with reception), International Cooperation, Leadership and Management, Pharmacy and Drug Information Reception with Corporate Information Services, Public Services (Discussion Roundtables), Relevant Issues, and Technical Services #2. The Complementary and Alternative Medicine, Mental Health, and Primary Care SIGs also met. The marketing seminar, “Coping with Change: Reaching Your Library's Users,” was held again, and these groups held informal meetings: EOS.Web, PubMed Linkout Users, and QuickDOC Users Group.

Wednesday, May 23

In the early morning, the Continuing Education, Grants and Scholarships, Joseph Leiter NLM/MLA Lectureship, and Oral History Committees met, as did section program planners (MLA '08), Hospital Libraries Section (Executive Board Meeting #2), and Department of Veterans Affairs Librarians SIG. After the close of the meeting, the MLA Board of Directors met, the National Library of Medicine/Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries Leadership Fellows Program Leadership Institute took place, and the Continuing Education Committee held another meeting.

OPEN FORUMS

Three open forums were held concurrently on Tuesday, May 22, from 2:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. The open forums included:

The Academy Survey Results

In the fall of 2006, MLA's Credentialing Committee and Chapter Council collaborated on a national survey about the Academy of Health Information Professionals (AHIP), MLA's peer-reviewed professional development and career recognition program. It was distributed online using Zoomerang. This open forum session was facilitated by Tom Flemming, AHIP, and Elizabeth Irish, AHIP, who discussed the results of the survey [a summary of which can be found at <http://www.mlanet.org/members/mla_news/2007/mar_07/academy_survey.html> (member's only)]. There were 1,033 MLA members who responded. The respondents included 499 members of the academy, one-third of academy membership. The remainder of the responses came from non-academy members. One of the survey questions asked was why people joined the academy. The most frequent response was that academy membership showed personal commitment to the profession. The most frequent response (51%) regarding why people did not join was that they did not see the benefits for their situation. Additional survey questions probed the application process. The results included several recommendations for improvements in the process that will be reviewed by the committee. Specific chapter results will be distributed to chapter liaisons. After the survey results were presented, the meeting was opened for questions and comments. This survey provides the association with valuable feedback on the state of the Academy of Health Information Professionals.

Health Information Literacy

MLA's Health Information Literacy Research Project is funded by a contract from the National Library of Medicine (NLM). The principal coinvestigators are Jean Shipman, AHIP, MLA president, 2006/07, and Carla J. Funk, CAE, MLA executive director. The project coordinator, Sabrina Kurtz-Rossi, facilitated the open forum and gave an overview of the project. The goals of the research project are to (1) understand health care providers' knowledge and perception of health information literacy issues, (2) increase provider and patient awareness and use of NLM health information tools and resources, and (3) identify roles medical librarians can play in addressing these issues. Progress on each of the goals was described. A national survey of hospital administrators and health care providers to assess their awareness of health information literacy issues and the value of health literacy in supporting patient care is being prepared. The development and piloting of a health information literacy curriculum is also being planned. After the project was described, the forum audience commented on and discussed additional existing programs and initiatives. More information on the project is available at <http://www.mlanet.org/resources/healthlit/hil_project_overview.html>.

Librarians Without Borders

MLA's Task Force on Librarians Without Borders facilitated this open forum to update members about MLA's widening global initiatives. The program began by acknowledging a debt of gratitude to Microsoft for providing a new authentication system for the Health InterNetwork Access to Research Initiative (HINARI). The HINARI program, a collaboration between the World Health Organization (WHO) and major publishers, enables developing countries to gain access to biomedical and health literature [more information is available at <http://www.who.int/hinari/en/>]. After a video about the HINARI program, Lenny Rhine, University of Florida–Gainsville, and grant coordinator, talked about the use of the $80,000 grant MLA received from Elsevier to train librarians on the African, Asian, and Latin American continents. He showed slides and answered questions about the four-day, on-site electronic library workshops he has presented for medical librarians, health personnel, and researchers in developing areas in Asia and Africa. These workshops used training materials developed by HINARI, which he has updated, and were presented in collaboration with WHO and the Information Training and Outreach Centre for Africa (ITOCA) [more information can be found at <http://www.itoca.org>]. The grant has also been used to develop an email version of the HINARI training course. More information about the project can be found on the MLA website at <http://www.mlanet.org/resources/global/>.

NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE UPDATE

Donald A. B. Lindberg, director of the National Library of Medicine (NLM), began the NLM Update, which took place Tuesday, May 22, from 10:30 a.m.– 11:30 a.m. He gave updates on new and retiring personnel and the completed long-range plan and elaborated on the importance of developing personal health records, individual genome projects, the Framingham Study, disaster information management research, and NLM's educational mission. Martha Szczur, acting associate director, Division of Specialized Information Services, followed with highlights on the environmental health and toxicology programs, HIV/AIDS update, outreach activities including the Sacred Root program and Refugee Health Information Network (RHIN), and directories of health information, featuring DIRLINE and Health Hotlines [slides available at <http://www.nlm.nih.gov/pubs/techbull/mj07/nlm_update_ppt/szczur_nlm_update.ppt>]. Sheldon Kotzin, FMLA, associate director of library operations, gave an update on staff changes, described typical days at NLM, and presented highlights of the latest accomplishments [slides available at <http://www.nlm.nih.gov/pubs/techbull/mj07/nlm_update_ppt/kotzin_nlm_update.ppt>].

LEGISLATIVE UPDATE

The Governmental Relations Committee (GRC) sponsored an update on Tuesday, May 22, from 1:00 p.m.– 2:00 p.m. Dale Dirks, president, Health and Medicine Council of Washington (DC), and MLA's legislature representative in Washington, gave a Capitol Hill overview and an update on health and education funding for Fiscal Year 2008. Jonathan Band, who represents library associations on intellectual property and Internet policy matters, reported on legislation related to copyright-orphan works, Fair Use Act revision, Section 108 Study Group, and an amicus brief filed by MLA. The program ended with a question and answer period with the two speakers.

OTHER SPECIAL EVENTS AND RECEPTIONS

Saturday, May 19:

  • Leaders' Tea, 3:00 p.m.–5:15 p.m.
  • Welcome Reception and Opening of Hall of Exhibits, 5:30 p.m.–7:30 p.m.

Sunday, May 20:

  • Majors 19th Annual Walk for Fun, 6:30 a.m.–7:30 a.m.
  • New Members' and First-time Attendees Breakfast, 7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.
  • Chapter Council Presents Sharing Roundtables, noon–2:00 p.m.
  • International Visitors' Reception, 6:00 p.m.–7:00 p.m.
  • Library School Reunion, 6:00 p.m.–7:00 p.m.
  • Friends of the National Library of Medicine Reception, Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, 7:00 p.m.–9:30 p.m.

Monday, May 21:

  • Academy of Health Information Professionals Question-and-Answer Session, 1:30 p.m.–2:30 p.m.
  • ECRI Institute Evidence-Based Practice Center Reception, 5:30 p.m.–7:00 p.m.

Tuesday, May 22:

  • Rockin' rEvolution, 7:00 p.m.–10:00 p.m.

SUNRISE SEMINARS

Vendors again held Sunrise Seminars to provide information and introduce new products and services. On Sunday, May 20, the American Psychological Association, Mosby-Elsevier, EBSCO, McGraw-Hill, Ovid, and Thomson Scientific gave seminars. On Monday, May 21, CINAHL, EMBASE, the National Library of Medicine, MD Consult, and Rittenhouse presented seminars, and, on Tuesday, May 22, there were seminars by Doody's, Elsevier, and EBSCO.

TECHNOLOGY SHOWCASES

Twelve technology showcases were held Sunday through Tuesday. These were:

  • What's New 2007: McGraw-Hill Online Medical Resources, May 20, 12:30 p.m.–1:00 p.m.
  • EBSCO Publishing: Health Library: Evidence-based Patient Information for Community Outreach, May 20, 1:30 p.m.–2:00 p.m.
  • The R2 Library from Rittenhouse, May 20, 2:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m.
  • EBSCOhost Medical Interface Enhancements, May 20, 4:30 p.m.–5:00 p.m.
  • EBSCO Publishing: DynaMed—EBSCO's Point-of-Care Solution, May 21, 10:00 a.m.–10:30am
  • Nature Clinical Practice–Committed to Quality Clinical Publishing, May 21, 11:00 a.m.–11:30 a.m.
  • EBSCO Publishing: The Global Infectious Disease and Epidemiology Network (GIDEON) Point-of-care Reference for Infectious Disease and More, May 21, 1:30 p.m.–2:00 p.m.
  • Thomson Scientific: Advance Scholarly Publishing with EndNote—Desktop and Web, May 21, 2:30 p.m.– 3:00 p.m.
  • American Psychological Association (APA) PsycNET: APA's Redesigned Search Interface, May 21, 3:30 p.m.–4:00 p.m.
  • MEDLINE with Full Text from EBSCO Publishing, May 22, 10:00 a.m.–10:30 a.m.
  • CINAHL Update, May 22, 11:30 am–noon
  • SydneyPlus International: One Stop Medical Resources Access, May 22, 1:30 p.m.–2:00 p.m.

CONTINUING EDUCATION COURSES AND SYMPOSIUM

The 2006/07 Continuing Education Committee offered the following courses on May 18, 19, and 23, 2007:

CE 101, Bioethics: An Introduction for Health Information Professionals

CE 102, The Librarian as a Professional, or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Complexity

CE 200, The Business Case Reloaded: Scoring High in Credibility, Accuracy, and Practical Value Using Your Passport to Approval, Funding, and Transformation

CE 201, Decision Making: How to Make the Hard Decisions

CE 202, Redesigning Library Spaces for the Electronic Age

CE 203, Using Digital Photography to Enhance Your Library's Image

CE 204, Library Director: Knowledge, Skills, and Career Paths

CE 205, Leadership and Emotional Intelligence

CE 206, Planning and Managing the Consumer Health Library

CE 207, Reverse Strategic Planning: One Proven Method for Improving Communication and Coordination at Your Medical Library or Institution

CE 208, Leadership in a Health Sciences Library: Be a Leader from Your First Day on the Job

CE 300, The History of the Health Sciences: A One-day Overview

CE 301, The Molecular and Genetic Bases of Cancer

CE 302, Finding References to Conference Papers and Poster Presentations

CE 303, Government Statistics and Regulations: A Primer for Non-Government Documents Librarians

CE 304, Becoming an Expert Searcher

CE 305, The Medical School Experience

CE 306, Providing Health Information Resources and Services in Other Languages

CE 307, Searching for Drug and Pharmaceutical Information Online

CE 308, Easy-to-Read Health and Wellness Material for Consumers

CE 309, Will Duct Tape Cure My Warts? Examining Complementary and Alternative Medicine

CE 400, Managing Electronic Journal Collections: People, Tools, and Services

CE 500, Geeks Bearing Gifts: Unwrapping New Technology Trends

CE 501, Designing Effective Online Tutorials Enhanced with Interactive Video Demonstrations

CE 600, Creating More Effective Learning Activities

CE 602, Evidence-based Public Health: Finding and Appraising Relevant Resources

CE 700, Statistics for the Statistically Challenged

CE 701, Understanding and Using Medical Terminology

CE 702, Quality Filtering: Critical Appraisal and Synthesis of the Biomedical Literature

CE 703, Writing for Peer-reviewed Library Journals

CE 704, Web Survey Design and Tools for the Busy Librarian

CE 705, Understanding Health Care Literature: A Primer

CE 800, Symposium: Scholarly Publishing Issues: The Challenges and Opportunities Facing Libraries in an Open Access Environment. Sponsored by MLA's Scholarly Publishing Task Force; Governmental Relations Committee; Collection Development, Leadership and Management, and Technical Services Sections; and Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries, the symposium was held on Wednesday, May 23 from 1:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. (Financial contributions from Elsevier, John Wiley & Sons, and Ovid.)

The twenty-nine pre-meeting courses, three post-meeting courses, and one post-meeting symposium had a total attendance of 702.

RESOURCES AND SERVICES

MLA offered its usual array of services for meeting attendees. A Hospitality Center provided maps and information about Philadelphia. The Information Desk, part of the MLA Registration Center, was the place to leave messages for MLA staff or the Board of Directors, and it served as the Lost and Found center. A Message Center allowed colleagues to connect through notes, and the Internet Café was available twenty-four hours a day, Saturday, May 19–Wednesday, May 23. The Job Placement Center was open for twenty-five hours, Saturday, May 19–Tuesday, May 22, and shared space with the Member Resource Room that provided copy machines, computers, and printers for association business. The Speaker Ready room was available Friday through Tuesday for those making presentations during the meeting. The Town Crier was published on Sunday through Tuesday, May 20–May 22. This official newsletter of MLA '07 provided program updates and corrections, room changes, meeting announcements, and interesting facts about Philadelphia. The MLA Connection Booth was available to pick up information about MLA's programs and services. Included here were the Grants and Scholarship MLA Store and the Public Relations Swap and Shop.


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