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Clin Exp Immunol. May 2007; 148(2): 241–247.
PMCID: PMC1868872

This article has been retractedRetraction in: Clin Exp Immunol. 2008 December; 154(3): 433    See also: PMC Retraction Policy

Increased serum high mobility group box-1 level in Churg–Strauss syndrome

Abstract

Churg–Strauss syndrome (CSS) is a rare form of systemic vasculitis occurring in patients with asthma and hypereosinophilia; however, its mechanisms involved in the severe tissue inflammation with vasculitis are poorly understood. High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein, originally identified as a DNA binding protein, also has potent pro-inflammatory and proangiogenic properties. In this study, we hypothesized that HMGB1 might be associated with CSS, and examined serum HMGB1 levels and compared those of asthma patients and healthy volunteers. We also investigated HMGB1 expression in the lesion, and eosinophil HMGB1 amount in CSS patients. We found that the serum HMGB1 levels in CSS patients were significantly higher than those of asthma patients and healthy volunteers. Eosinophils in the CSS lesion expressed HMGB1 and HMGB1 level in eosinophils from CSS patients was significantly higher than that of asthma patients, while there was no significant difference in HMGB1 levels in peripheral mononuclear cells. The serum HMGB1 level in CSS patients decreased after the steroid therapy, and showed significant positive correlations with several molecules, including soluble interleukin-2 receptor, soluble thrombomodulin, and eosinophil cationic protein in sera. We propose that HMGB1 might contribute to the pathogenesis of CSS.

Keywords: eosinophil, inflammation, vasculitis

Introduction

Churg–Strauss syndrome (CSS) is a primary systemic vasculitis of mainly small and intermediate vessels with a propensity for lung involvement [1]. Analysis of tissue biopsy specimens from patients with CSS shows an eosinophil-rich inflammatory infiltrate with granuloma formation in connective tissue [1,2]. It is commonly thought of as an autoimmune disease [3], but the mechanisms involved in the severe tissue inflammation with vasculitis are poorly understood [4].

High mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) is a widely expressed member of the HMGB family of chromosomal proteins [5]. It exerts nuclear functions by interacting with specific DNA structures or after recruitment by various DNA binding proteins [5]. Recent studies have demonstrated surprising cytokine-like roles for extracellular HMGB1 [6]. Indeed, HMGB1 released by injured or necrotic cells acts as a signalling molecule, inducing local inflammatory responses [7]. Also, HMGB1 is actively secreted by monocytes stimulated by cytokines and LPS [8]. In turn, extracellular HMGB1 regulates cytokine expression [9,10] and promotes inflammatory cell recruitment [7,10]. Moreover, HMGB1 stimulates the migration of adherent cells, such as fibroblasts and smooth muscle cells [11]. Thus, extracellular HMGB1 can be regarded as both a signal of tissue injury and a mediator of inflammation. In addition, HMGB1 exerts proangiogenic effects by inducing MAPK ERK1/2 activation [12].

In this study, we investigated 18 patients with CSS and found increased serum levels of HMGB1 compared with asthma. HMGB1 might contribute to the pathogenesis of CSS.

Materials and methods

Patients

This study was reviewed and approved by the Kagoshima University Faculty of Medicine Committee on Human Research. We investigated 18 patients with CSS who were admitted to the Division of Respiratory Medicine, Respiratory and Stress Care Centre, Kagoshima University Hospital, from 1995 to 2005. There were 8 men and 10 women whose mean age was 58·2 ± 18·2 years old (mean ± standard deviation). For comparison, we also investigated 19 patients with asthma (male : female = 8 : 11, 58·9 ± 15·3 years old), 12 healthy volunteers (male : female = 5 : 7, 58·9 ± 13·1 years old), and 8 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients (male : female = 3 : 5, 53·5 ± 15·2 years old). The diagnosis of CSS was made according to the 1990 edition of CSS published by the American College of Rheumatology [13]. All patients with CSS fulfilled more than five criteria. We excluded patients with rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes mellitus, acute or chronic liver disease, and immunological abnormalities that predispose to opportunistic infection. Peripheral leucocyte counts before the start of therapy were also determined.

Measurement of serum HMGB1 and cytokines

In the patients with CSS, asthma and acute bronchitis, we measured serum levels of HMGB1 before the patients underwent therapy and 3 months after the start of therapy. All participants gave written consent to participate in this study. Also we measured serum soluble interleukin receptor-2 (sIL-2R), soluble thrombomodulin (sTM), and eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) levels before the start of therapy because these cytokines have been reported to be elevated in sera of CSS patients [14,15]. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for HMGB1 in the sera was performed with the use of monoclonal antibodies to HMGB1 and with standardization to a curve of recombinant human HMGB1 as described previously [16]. Briefly, a polystyrene microtiter plate was coated with 100 µl of 3 mg/l anti-HMGB1 polyclonal antibody (Shino-TEST, Kanagawa, Japan) and incubated at 37 °C overnight. The unbound antibodies were removed by washing plates three times with PBS containing 0·05% Tween 20 (washing buffer) and the remaining binding sites in the wells were blocked by incubating the plates for 2 h with 400 µl/well PBS containing 1% BSA. After washing, 100 µl of each dilution of the standards and samples was added to the wells. The microtiter plates were incubated for 24 h at room temperature. After washing, 100 µl/well of anti-human HMGB1 peroxidase-conjugated monoclonal antibody (Shino-TEST) was added and the plate was incubated at room temperature for 2 h. After washing, 3,3,′,5,5′-tetra-methylbenzide was added to the well. The enzyme reaction was allowed to proceed for 30 min at room temperature. The chromogenic substrate reaction was stopped by addition of stop solution (0·35 mol/l Na2SO4) and the absorbance was read at 450 nm. The serum levels of sIL-2R, sTM and ECP were measured using a commercial ELISA kit (sIL-2R, R & D Systems, Minneapolis, MN, USA; sTM, Tepnel Lifecodes Corp., Stamford, CT, USA; ECP, Medical & Biological Laboratories Co., Ltd, Nagoya, Japan) according to the manufacturer's protocols.

Immunohistochemical s taining for HMGB1

Immunohistochemical staining for HMGB1 was performed using a rabbit polyclonal antibody (Shino-TEST) employing the DAB method using the biopsy samples of five CSS patients as described previously [17]. Briefly, 4-µm thick sections were mounted on poly L-lysine-coated slides, dewaxed, and washed in Tris-buffered saline (pH 7·4) for 10 min. For optimal antigen retrieval, the sections were pressure cooked in 0·01 m citrate buffer (pH 6·0) for 90 s. Endogenous peroxidase activity was blocked using a 3% hydrogen peroxide solution in methanol for 10 min. Following two washes in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) containing 1% saponin, the blocking reaction was performed as reported previously [18]. The sections were incubated with a 1 : 400 dilution of the primary antibody solution for 2 h at room temperature. Negative control slides were incubated with rabbit IgG (R & D systems, Minneapolis, MN, USA). Secondary biotinylated anti-immunoglobulin antibodies (R & D systems) were added, and the mixture was incubated for 30 min at room temperature. Following washing, the sections were incubated with streptavidin conjugated to horseradish peroxidase (Amersham, Arlington Heights, IL, USA) and then rinsed with deionized water. DAB substrate solution was added, and the mixture was incubated for 10 min. A positive result was indicated by a brown colour reaction.

Preparation of cells and Western blotting for HMGB1

To access the amount of HMGB1 in eosinophils, peripheral eosinophils were selected from five different CSS patients and asthma patients using magnetic beads as described previously [19]. Briefly, human eosinophils were obtained from heparinized venous blood of the CSS and asthma patients before they underwent therapy. Heparinized venous blood was mixed with a quarter volume of 2% dextran solution (Sigma-Aldrich Corp., St Louis, MO, USA) to precipitate red blood cells. After incubation for 30 min at room temperature, the leucocyte-rich plasma was laid onto Histopaque (Sigma-Aldrich Corp., St Louis, MO, USA) and centrifuged at 800 × g for 20 min at room temperature. Granulocytes were separated from erythrocytes by lysis in 0·2% NaCl and washed in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) three times at 4 °C; next, eosinophils were isolated by negative selection using magnetic beads (Eosinophil Isolation Kit; Miltenyi Biotec GmbH, Bergisch, Germany) according to the manufacturer's protocol. Eosinophils were resuspended in Roswell Park Memorial Institute (RPMI) 1640 medium containing 10% fetal calf serum (FCS) and streptomycin/penicillin (the complete medium). The purity of eosinophils was more than 99% by morphological examination after staining with Diff-Quick (Wako, Tokyo, Japan). Also, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were separated from heparinized venous blood of CSS and asthma patients by Histopaque gradient centrifugation as described previously [20].

Western blot analysis was performed as previously described [21,22]. Briefly, 1 × 106 eosinophils or 1 × 107 PBMCs were collected and lysed on ice for 20 min in 1 ml of lysis buffer containing 50 mm N-(2-hydroxyethyl)piperazine-N′-2-ethanesulphonic acid (HEPES), 150 mM NaCl, 1% Triton X-100, 10% glycerol, and a cocktail of protease inhibitors (Roche, Indianapolis, IN, USA). The lysates were spun, and the 20-µl supernatants were collected and the same volume, i.e. 20 µl of double-strength sample buffer (20% glycerol, 6% sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS), 10% 2-mercaptoethanol) was added. The samples were boiled for 10 min. Proteins were analysed on 12% polyacrylamide gels by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and transferred electrophoretically to nitrocellulose membranes at 150 mA for 1 h by using a semi-dry system. The membranes were incubated with rabbit polyclonal anti-HMGB1 antibody (Shino-TEST) or mouse anti-human actin monoclonal antibody (Santa-Cruz Biotechnology Inc., Santa-Cruz, CA, USA) followed by a sheep anti-rabbit or mouse IgG coupled with horseradish peroxidase. Peroxidase activity was visualized by the Enhanced Chemiluminescence detection system (GE Healthcare, Little Chalfont, Bucks, UK).

Statistical analysis

We used one-way factorial analysis of variance (anova) with the Bonferroni-Dunn test, Mann–Whitney test, or Pearson's correlation coefficient. A P-value below 0·05 was considered significant. Most values were expressed as mean ± standard deviation (s.d.).

Results

As shown in Fig. 1, the serum HMGB1 level was significantly higher than that in asthma patients, healthy volunteers and RA patients (CSS, 16·1 ± 8·65 pg/m; asthma, 0·44 ± 0·41 pg/ml; healthy volunteers, 0·46 ± 0·48 pg/ml; RA, 4·81 ± 3·53 pg/ml). There was no significant difference in serum HMGB1 levels among the asthma patients, healthy volunteers and RA patients. The sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis of CSS was 94·4% and 100%, respectively (cut-off = 1·6 pg/ml, P < 0·001). The serum HMGB1 level in CSS patients significantly decreased 3 months after the start of therapy (Fig. 1b). The clinical symptoms of CSS patients improved with the use of corticosteroids. The serum HMGB1 level after the therapy in CSS patients was significantly higher than that of asthma patients (after the therapy, 5·41 ± 3·21 pg/ml; asthma, 0·44 ± 0·41 pg/ml; P < 0·01, Mann–Whitney test). In CSS, no patient suffered from infectious disease, including sepsis. Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) was positive in 10 CSS patients. The serum HMGB1 level in ANCA-positive CSS patients was significantly higher than that in ANCA-negative CSS patients (P< 0·01, ANCA-positive = 21·04 ± 6·77 pg/ml, ANCA-negative = 9·91 ± 6·65 pg/ml).

Fig. 1
(a) Comparison of serum HMGB1 level among four groups. The serum HMGB1 level in CSS patients was significantly higher than that in asthma patients, healthy volunteers and rheumatoid arthritis patients (HV, healthy volunteer; RA, rheumatoid arthritis; ...

In immunohistochemical analysis, tissue infiltrating inflammatory cells including eosinophils and blood vessel cells stained positive for HMGB1 (Fig. 2).

Fig. 2
Immunohistochemical staining for HMGB1. Eosinophils and vascular endothelial cells stained intense positive for HMGB1 (×300 original magnification; (a) hematoxilin eosin staining; (b) HMGB1 staining; (c) negative control). Representative data ...

We compared other serological markers of CSS such as eosinophil counts, serum sIL-2R, serum sTM and ECP levels with serum HMGB1 levels. As shown in Fig. 3, peripheral eosinophil counts, serum sIL-2R level, serum sTM level and serum ECP level showed significant positive correlation with serum HMGB1 level in CSS patients. Serum HMGB1 level did not show significant correlation with peripheral lymphocyte counts (r = 0·189, P = 0·22) and peripheral neutrophil counts (r = 0·213, P = 0·112).

Fig. 3
Correlation between serum HMGB1 level with serum cytokine levels in CSS patients. The serum HMGB1 level showed significant positive correlation with peripheral eosinophil counts, serum soluble interleukin-2 receptor (sIL-2R) levels, serum soluble thrombomodulin ...

Finally, we compared the HMGB1 level in eosinophils and PBMCs between CSS patients and asthma patients. As shown in Fig. 4, the HMGB1 level in eosinophils from CSS patients was significantly higher than that in eosinophils from asthma patients. However, the HMGB1 level in PBMCs of CSS patients was not different from that in PBMCs from asthma patients.

Fig. 4
Comparison of HMGB1 amount in eosinophils and PBMCs between CSS patients and asthma patients. The HMGB1 amount in eosinophils from CSS patients was significantly higher than that of asthma patients. However, there was no significant difference in HMGB1 ...

Discussion

To our knowledge, this is the first report describing HMGB1 in CSS. HMGB1 appears to have two distinct functions in cellular systems. First, it has been shown to have an intracellular role as a regulator of transcription [23] and, second, an extracellular role in which it promotes tumour metastasis [24] and inflammation [25]. HMGB1 acts as a late mediator of lethal endotoxaemia [25], a mediator of acute lung injury [9] and as a pro-inflammatory cytokine [10]. Serum levels of HMGB1 have been directly associated with mortality in patients with lethal sepsis [25], suggesting that HMGB1 may be a crucial member of the uncontrolled pro-inflammatory response associated with fatal outcome. HMGB1 can be released from cells of the macrophage/monocyte lineage following activation by pro-inflammatory stimuli [26] and has been reported to be involved in the inflammation of autoimmune disease such as rheumatoid arthritis [27], systemic lupus erythematosus [28], and ulcerative colitis [29]. HMGB1 is a possible target antigen of ANCAs [30] and its binding with the receptor for advanced glycation end products acts as a potent angiogenic molecule [12]. In our study, serum HMGB1 level was significantly higher than that of asthma patients even after the therapy. The serum HMGB1 in ANCA-positive CSS patients was significantly higher than those in ANCA-negative CSS patients, and serum HMGB1 level showed significant positive correlation with several molecules that have been reported to have association with the pathogenesis of CSS [14,15].

Prominent eosinophilia is one of the defining features of CSS [31]. Its magnitude commonly reflects clinical disease activity and in many situations eosinophil suppression results in clinical improvement [3133]. CSS can affect virtually any organ system in the body [34,35], and therefore, systemic symptoms are prominent in CSS [1,2]. Analysis of tissue biopsy specimens from patients with CSS shows an eosinophil-rich inflammatory infiltrate with granuloma formation in connective tissue and blood-vessel walls [1,2]. Thus, eosinophils play an important role in the pathogenesis of CSS. In our study, eosinophils stained positive for HMGB1 and serum HMGB1 level showed significant positive correlation with peripheral eosinophil counts. In addition, the HMGB1 level in eosinophils from CSS patients was significantly higher than that in eosinophils from asthma patients, while there was no significant difference in HMGB1 level in PBMCs between CSS patients and asthma patients. HMGB1 is one of the candidates that can induce eosinophil chemotaxis [36]. HMGB1 also can bind interleukin-5 promoter [37] and induce the secretion of interleukin-5 [38], which play a pivotal role in the control of eosinophils [39]. Taken together, we think it might be possible that HMGB1 can work as an autocrine factor regulating eosinophil function, and therefore, we propose that HMGB1 might contribute to the pathogenesis of CSS. HMGB1 antagonists provide a relatively wide window for therapeutic intervention in some experimental disease models such as sepsis [40]. Further studies addressing HMGB1 in CSS might bring a new insight to clarify the pathogenesis of CSS.

Churg–Strauss syndrome (CSS) is a rare disorder that is characterized by asthma, hypereosinophilia, and evidence of vasculitis with massive infiltration of eosinophils affecting a number of organs [1]. The prevalence is of the order of 1·3/100 000 in the general population, compared with 3·3 for polyarteritis nodosa and 5·3 for Wegener's granulomatosis [41,42]. Successful treatment of this rare syndrome needs prompt differentiation of CSS from asthma alone [1,2]; however, there have been few serological markers to distinguish CSS from asthma. Therefore, we examined the clinical value of serum HMGB1 measurement to distinguish CSS from asthma. The sensitivity and specificity of serum HMGB1 levels of 1·6 pg/ml to distinguish CSS from asthma were 94·4% and 100%, respectively. Abnormal laboratory findings in patients with CSS include increased peripheral blood eosinophil count and a raised ESR [1,43]. However, it is sometimes difficult to distinguish CSS from asthma using these markers because of the following reasons: (i) rarely, eosinophilia is not present and wide-ranging and rapid changes in eosinophil counts happen in CSS [31]; (ii) use of corticosteroids to treat asthma may result in failure to detect eosinophilia in patients with undiagnosed CSS; (iii) increase of ESR occurs in other disorders such as infection. Other serological markers, ANCA, are present in 44% to 66% of CSS patients, with the most common pattern being perinuclear [32,44,45]. In addition, ANCA-positivity needs to be confirmed by demonstration of myeloperoxidase in serum [2]. In our study, the serum HMGB1 level of CSS patients after the therapy was significantly higher than those of asthma patients even after the therapy. Therefore, we propose that measurement of serum VEGF might become one of the useful serum markers to distinguish CSS from asthma, as a positive result greatly increases the likelihood of CSS. However, our study is too small and short to draw definitive conclusions. We propose that larger and longer-scale studies addressing this point are necessary to judge its diagnostic value.

In conclusion, we propose the possible involvement of HMGB1 in the pathogenesis of CSS. However, the origin of HMGB1 is not clear from the results of our study, and it is curious that the serum HMGB1 level is increased in other systemic vasculitis conditions such as microscopic angitis and Wegener's granulomatosus. Our next goal is to clarify these points.

Acknowledgments

This study was supported by the Grant-in-aid for Scientific Research (#18790542) from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS), and a grant from The Naito Foundation. We give special thanks to Mrs Rumi Matsuyama (Third Department of Internal Medicine, Kagoshima University Faculty of Medicine) for her excellent help.

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