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J Med Libr Assoc. Jan 2007; 95(1): e10–e47.
PMCID: PMC1773029

Proceedings of the 106th annual meeting of the Medical Library Association

Frances H. Lynch, MLS, AHIP1 and Judith L. Rieke, MLS, PhD2

CONTENTS

Introduction

Welcome to MLA '06

Plenary Session I, Presidential Address: Mary Joan (M. J.) Tooey

Other Plenary Sessions

Awards Ceremony

Business Meeting I

Business Meeting II, Presidential Inaugural Address: Jean P. Shipman, and MLA '07 Invitation

Section Programming I–III

Poster Presentations

Other Meetings and Events

Open Forums

Sunrise Seminars

Technology Showcases

National Library of Medicine Update

Legislative Update

Other Special Events and Receptions

Continuing Education Courses and Symposia

Resources and Services

INTRODUCTION

The Medical Library Association (MLA), held its 106th annual meeting in Phoenix, Arizona, May 19–24, 2006, at the Phoenix Convention Center. The meeting theme was “Transformations A–Z.” Total attendance was 2,317.

Additional meeting content, including the meeting program and some electronic presentations from business, plenary, poster, and section presentations can be found via the MLA '06 Website, <http://www.mlanet.org/am/am2006/>. Candid photos can be found at the site as well.

WELCOME TO MLA '06

Sunday, May 21, 2006

MLA President MJ Tooey, AHIP, welcomed members to the meeting with the greeting, “It's Transformation Time”, convened the opening session! She thanked the 2006 National Program Committee (NPC) for planning a program that would help participants “acknowledge the transformations in our libraries, our profession and even in our own lives.” President Tooey reminded everyone that a conference is not supposed to be all work, and that this meeting offers a time to network with colleagues at “transforming” social events where the “collegiality will be warm and air conditioning will be ever so cool!”

President Tooey introduced Alice Kawakami, chair of the Medical Library Group of Southern California and Arizona, who welcomed everyone to Phoenix on behalf of the chapter. She commented on how the origin of the city Phoenix, which is built on the ashes of an earlier civilization, is reminiscent of the transformation theme of the conference.

The co-chairs of the 2006 NPC, James Shedlock, AHIP, and Debra Ketchell, AHIP, and the co-chairs of the Local Assistance Committee (LAC), Jacqueline Donaldson Doyle, AHIP, and Kay Wellik, AHIP, were presented to the group. Shedlock and Ketchell extended their welcomes to the group first. They emphasized that the NPC's goal was to make this the best meeting ever and invited everyone to take advantage of the educational opportunities available. The flexible and creative theme allowed the NPC to explore ways to allow everyone to experience transformations from A to Z. The members of the NPC team were recognized, as were the section planners who, as Ketchell underscored, are a very important component of the meeting. She also gave special thanks to the local assistance committee, headquarters staff, and the conference planners. The LAC co-chairs next welcomed the participants, thanked their committee members and volunteers, and reminded everyone to stop by the hospitality table and learn about the many ways to enjoy Phoenix and Arizona.

President Tooey proceeded to recognize the many valued sponsors who provided financial and in-kind contributions to support the meeting. The 2006 sponsors contributed more than $94,000 to help transform and enrich the meeting. The sponsors at the different levels of support were acknowledged.

Shedlock then introduced MLA President Tooey who gave her presidential address.

PRESIDENTIAL ADDRESS (PLENARY SESSION I)

MJ Tooey: I've been told the presidential address is not as much fun as the inaugural address because it is basically just a report on the accomplishments of the past year. When I asked how long I had, I was told twenty-to-twenty-five minutes. That barely gets me warmed up! So, in an attempt to meet the time constraints, I am going to eliminate all humor, asides, and any attempts to entertain you with a recitation of your accomplishments this past year. And, they are YOUR accomplishments because as I said throughout this past year—YOU are the MLA!

What a busy year it has been! Living up to a presidential theme is hard work. And keeping your eye on transformations can be exhausting! Sometimes they are blatant and sometimes they are so subtle. So what did we do to transform our profession, our association, and ourselves? I would like to open with a quote from my husband, Ron, “It's Saturday morning. Who are you and what are you doing in my bed?”

By far, the most exciting part of my presidential year was travel to chapter and other meetings. Every past-president tells you these meetings are the best part and they are right. The energy, camaraderie, friendliness, and good ideas found especially at chapter meetings, is amazing. I curled, slap shot and skated on Olympic ice at the New York-New Jersey/Upstate New York and Ontario Chapter joint meeting in Lake Placid; pretended I was on Oprah at MAC in Charlottesville; journeyed with Lewis and Clark at the Pacific Northwest Chapter in Portland, danced with clowns and others at the Southern Chapter in San Juan, and went nostalgically back to my former home in Pittsburgh. I enjoyed Norwegian hospitality for the IFLA meeting in Oslo and Brazilian warmth in Salvador, Bahia, at the Ninth Congress on International Medical Librarianship.

About six weeks ago, I made good on my pledge to visit at least two library schools when I made MJ's Magical Mystery Tour of the Northeast, visiting Southern Connecticut State University, Simmons College, and the University of Rhode Island. In addition to preaching to students about the wonders of medical librarianship (I think I made some converts!), I met with members of the medical library communities in Connecticut, Massachusetts, and Rhode Island, attending receptions and breakfasts and learning about the challenges facing our members. What collegiality and creativity! I would recommend every future president add a visit to at least one library school into their presidential year. Not only is it a great opportunity for the students, but it forces you to examine and articulate what makes medical librarianship so special.

I would like to take this opportunity to mention that MLA gained 444 new members this year. I would like to welcome the new members who are sitting here with us in the audience.

Over the past year, MLA has undertaken a number of other recruitment activities. At their meeting prior to the start of the annual meeting, the Board of Directors passed a motion to make the ad hoc Professional Recruitment and Retention Committee a standing committee of the association. “Join the Healthcare Team: Become a Medical Librarian,” our new recruitment DVD has been developed. We will see the world premiere at the end of this talk! Copies of the DVD will be available in the Member Resource Room at the end of this session. The Leadership and Management Section's Task Force on Professional Development for Current and Aspiring Middle Managers will deliver their final report on Tuesday, during their Open Forum.

MLA continued the education efforts that are the hallmark of our association and the envy of other professional associations through our strong continuing education courses, discussion groups, and November Webcast, “Keeping People Safe: Roles for Information Professionals.” In cooperation with the Greater Midwestern Region of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, seventeen MLA members attended a one-week session on Web-based course design, enabling them to transform traditional courses into Web-accessible ones. Reviews of the course were glowing. MLA members will benefit, as they will have access to Web-based course content when these classes are completed. The Center of Research and Education or CORE, which is found on MLANET, continues to grow and evolve and will play an integral part in the MLANET of the future.

Speaking of MLANET, we've begun the process of “transforming” MLA's Website. This year the MLANET Editorial Board began the process by identifying “low hanging fruit” issues that could be addressed immediately. The Editorial Board developed a survey earlier this year to which many of you responded. (Thank you.) They will be holding focus groups at this meeting. MLA headquarters' staff installed a new server, and did some backroom cleanup. And, the Board of Directors approved and supported the acquisition of an administrative management system and the hiring of a design firm to look at MLANET.

I really enjoyed my presidential space on MLANET. I received hundreds of messages at gro.qhalm@tnediserp, not all of them spam, which I thought was a great way to keep in touch with members. Hopefully, you read and enjoyed my travel reports and more recently, “The Phoenix Diaries.”

Our advocacy efforts have been at full-speed this year. Under my signature, more than two dozen letters went out supporting legislation, advocating for members and colleagues, and weighing in on major issues. Under the able leadership of Marianne Comegys, the Joint MLA/Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries Representatives (AAHSL) Task Force made two trips to Capitol Hill to “educate” legislators and staff about issues of importance to our members—increased funding for NIH/NLM, the closure of the EPA libraries, copyright, and public access. Past-president Pat Thibodeau continues to serve on NIH Public Access Working Group. She also serves as the chair of the MLA Scholarly Publishing Task Force. The task force term has been extended for another year so a symposium on issues in public access and publishing for MLA '07 can be developed. At the close of this meeting, this task force, together with the MLA Board and the Society for Scholarly Publishing will be hosting an invitation-only symposium to discuss issues of importance to MLA and the publishing industry. One of my favorite success stories this year was MLA's work with the International Association of Nurse Editors (INANE). We traveled with them to Philadelphia to advocate for increased coverage of nursing research in ISI publications. Our advocacy efforts were announced at the INANE's annual meeting and MLA received a standing ovation. We heard this spring that ISI was going to increase its coverage by almost 30 journals. Now that's transformation!

On the PR front, we continue, with the help of MLA's public relations firm, Public Communications Inc. (PCI), to raise awareness of medical librarianship. Our Medspeak brochure continues to receive rave reviews. In addition to the Spanish language version, this year we have added subject-specific Medspeaks on heart disease, diabetes, and breast cancer. And tomorrow, one of MLA's members will be in Mesa, AZ, teaching seniors how to find quality health information on the Internet. With placements in newspapers, magazines as diverse as Prevention and Medicine on the Net, and radio, we continue to work hard to get the word out. One great example is MyTechnologyLawyer.com. The host, Scott Draughon, explores all aspects of technology on the show. A few weeks back, members Joy Kennedy and Judith Robinson joined me, and we spent an hour talking with him about medical librarianship. At the end he thanked us for letting him participate in his own show. I guess we took over the show, but we warned him! By the way, he has asked MLA to return for six more segments beginning on June 1.

Make sure you stop by PCI's booth here at the meeting to visit the Swap and Shop. Also, PCI will be teaching a one-hour course called “How to Get Others to Love Your Library as Much as You Do.”

Continuing a presidential initiative from Joanne Marshall, AHIP, FMLA, the Research Policy Task Force headed by Suzanne Grefsheim and the Education Policy Task Force headed by Rick Forsman, AHIP, FMLA, have reached the halfway point of their task forces work. They've worked hard to gather input and develop drafts for the revisions of their documents. I hope you will attend the open forums on Tuesday to hear more about these important projects having an impact on our ongoing organizational transformation.

The Information Specialist in Context, or ISIC, Task Force completed its work this year and submitted its final report and recommendations. The Board of Directors has reviewed these recommendations and an implementation plan will be developed.

This year we also welcomed Nunzia Giuse, AHIP, FMLA, and her team as the new editors of the Journal of the Medical Library Association starting with the July issue, Linda Katz as the editor of MLA News, and Mary Piorun as the new coordinator of MEDLIB-L.

During my inaugural address last year, I voiced my concern regarding the current climate for hospital librarians. I am delighted to report that in partnership with the Hospital Libraries Section, we have begun the Vital Pathways Project. This project consists of three major components: a hospital libraries survey task force chaired by Pat Thibodeau, AHIP, a health libraries and education task force chaired by Diane Schwartz, AHIP, FMLA, and the Vital Pathways document task force chaired by Rosalind Lett, AHIP. To assist the document task force, we have already appointed an editorial review team so we can review and revise the document as it develops. These task forces will be working closely together, sharing information, and helping each other. Many talented and committed individuals will be working hard over the next two years to study the current climate and future possibilities for hospital libraries. Our end goal is a blueprint and pathway for future vital work done by our hospital librarians.

In my annual report that is posted on MLANET, I quoted John Lennon, who said, “Life is what happens when you are making other plans.” Who could have planned for the devastation and impact of last fall's succession of hurricanes? MLA moved into action and by working with our colleagues in the NLM, the South Central and Southeastern Atlantic Regional Medical Libraries, the Southern and South Central Chapters, and individual members, we identified areas of great need. To date, members and friends have donated close to $14,000.00 to the Medical Library Disaster Relief Fund. The MLA Board of Directors voted to match all donations up to $20,000.00. To date, we have dispersed over $15,000.00 in funds to support equipment, postage, and travel to the annual meeting. At this session and at the two other business meetings, you will see “In the Spirit of Community: Hurricane Katrina” segments with words and footage from some of our colleagues and friends. In today's society, we can become numbed to the tragedies all around us. I hope these clips remind everyone how bad it was and how much there still is to do. Donations to the fund can be made at the scholarship booth or through the Website. And, for all of you who have already donated, my deepest thanks. Let's take a look at the first segment.

To respond to both natural and manmade disasters, this past year, MLA established the Librarians Without Borders Task Force. This two-year task force, chaired by Marcus Banks, AHIP, will focus on suggesting sustainable collaborations for worldwide health improvement and health literacy, developing a mechanism for providing health information assistance and training during disasters, establishing an MLA International Award for Excellence in International Service, and developing a mechanism for sharing information about these activities. MLA has service-marked the name in the United States.

Well, my time is just about up, but I have a little personal housekeeping to take care of before I leave this podium.

First, the thank yous. I would like to divide this group into mentors and enablers. My entire life I have been lucky enough to have people who have helped me move along the path. You know, mentors are interesting. Sometimes it's a formal long-term relationship; sometimes it's a just-in-time lifesaving relationship. If I tried to name all of my mentors, we would be here a long time because I have been truly fortunate. I would also run the risk of forgetting someone. However, I would like to acknowledge a few colleagues who, whether they knew it or not, made a difference at some critical point in my life.

I would like to thank Frieda Weise, FMLA, for bringing me along and being a great friend and colleague, Michael Homan, AHIP, FMLA, for volunteering me for things I didn't know I needed to do but I did, Rick Forsman, AHIP, FMLA, for mentioning me in his Janet Doe Lecture in 2004 for no apparent reason, but actually for giving me my start on a national committee for the NPC in 1993 (it's all his fault I am up here— blame him), Lucretia McClure, AHIP, FMLA, for caring enough to watch over me and give sound advice, Tom Basler, FMLA, who showed me you don't have to be serious to be serious.

There are others, including every member of MLA with whom I have had the pleasure of working over the years and throughout this presidential year. Every one of you has left a mark and has become part of who and why I am.

Now on to the enablers, and I mean this in the kindest psychosocial way. First, my colleagues on the board; they are smart and supportive and it was such a rush to work with them. They shine with moments of brilliance and thoughtful contemplation and discussion. Second, Carla Funk and the MLA headquarters' staff who act as if no problem is unsolvable, no request unfillable, and even when they say no, they do it kindly and gracefully. Third, the staff of the Health Sciences and Human Services Library, who have truly kept the home fires burning and who live in fear of my return. Their support has been incredible and constant. Fourth, my family, both in-laws and outlaws, who told me the stories, fought with me, teased me, encouraged me and loved me in spite of me.

And finally, the two most important people in my world: one who has been an enabler for almost thirty years and the other who has been enabling me since I went to MLA in Boston when she was three months old—Ron and Greer, my husband and daughter. I need to tell you a story about Greer. During one of her high school classes, a teacher asked her class what the letters MLA meant. Of course, he meant the Modern Language Association. Her arm shot up with the answer, Medical Library Association! Their unconditional love and support has made all the difference. Their belief in me is amazing, empowering, and transformational.

I would like to conclude with images from my garden and from gardens I encountered during my travels as a backdrop to my remarks. I'm pretty tired of PowerPoint.

If you recall, last year I talked about my garden in my inaugural address and how it was an analogy for transformations. Some changes take time; others are immediately apparent. My neighbor Barbara and I have differing gardening styles, but we still love our gardens—celebrating the diversity of the plants, delighting in our successes, sometimes mourning our failures, but always looking forward to the next season, the next bud, the next weed. We are catalysts for the transformation of our yards. I still think MLA is like a garden for all of those same reasons.

Being president of MLA has been a transformational experience for me. How have I been transformed? Some of the ways are subtle and some more overt. My hair is longer and if anything, I am more of an extrovert. I have learned so much by working with, meeting, and observing the best and brightest members of our association. I have experienced great joy and had great fun! I have known many kindnesses and am grateful for the opportunities I have had, and the trust you had that I would do the right thing. I have sensed so much enthusiasm and positive energy this year in our members and our association. Thank you for the honor of serving as your president. I will never be the same. I know transformation is upon us. Thank you.

President Tooey ended the session by thanking the MLA headquarters staff for their efforts on behalf of the membership and the profession. She asked those staff who were present to stand and be recognized and then concluded the session.

OTHER PLENARY SESSIONS

II, May 21, 2006: The John P. McGovern Lecture

Introduction: James Shedlock, AHIP, NPC co-chair, 2006 NPC, Galter Health Sciences Library, Northwestern University.

Atul Gawante, associate director, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Center for Surgery and Public Health, Boston, MA.

III, May 22, 2006: The Janet Doe Lecture

Introduction: Fred W. Roper, AHIP, FMLA, dean emeritus, School of Library and Information Science, University of South Carolina–Columbia.

Swimming With the Sharks: Perspectives on Professional Risk Taking: Julie J. McGowan, AHIP, FMLA, associate dean, Information Resources and Educational Technology, Ruth Lilly Medical Library, Indiana University School of Medicine—Indianapolis.

IV, May 24, 2006: Panel

Integrating Reference Information into the Electronic Health Record: Practice and Standards: Debra Ketchell, AHIP, associate dean, Knowledge Management, and director, Lane Medical Library, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA; Guilherme del Fiol, medical knowledge engineer, Intermountain Health Care, Salt Lake City, UT; Jerome Osheroff, chief clinical informatics office, Thomson Micromedex; Robert Abarbanel, senior director, Integrated IT Solutions, EC Healthcare; Sara Pimental, AHIP, content project manager, Kaiser Permanente Clinical Library, San Francisco, CA; Mary Fran Prottsman, AHIP, information services librarian, Library Program, Department of Veterans Affairs, Washington, DC; and Annette Williams, associate director, Library Operations, Eskind Biomedical Library, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN.

AWARDS CEREMONY

The Awards Ceremony and Luncheon was held on Monday, May 22, 2006. President Tooey began the ceremony by reminding everyone that we were there to honor our colleagues who have made outstanding contributions to the profession and the association and to recognize their accomplishments. She thanked Pamela Bradigan, chair of the Awards Committee, Virginia Carden, chair of the Grants and Scholarship Committee, and the jury members for their time and effort.

President Tooey announced that Anthony S. Fauci, MD, who presented the NLM/MLA Leiter Lecture on May 10 at the National Library of Medicine (slides available at http://videocast.nih.gov/pdf/niaid051006.pdf), received his certificate at that time. On Sunday of the meeting, Atul Gawande, MD, practicing surgeon, accomplished writer, teacher and speaker, delivered the John P. McGovern lecture and had received his award and certificate at that time.

The 2006 MLA Scholarship winner was Christine Greipp, a graduate student at the School of Information Sciences, University of Pittsburgh. The 2006 MLA Scholarship for Minority Students was presented to Monique Escamilla, a graduate student at the Department of Information Studies, University of California– Los Angeles. The MLA Scholarship for Minority Students To Attend the Annual Meeting is a one-time award sponsored by the 2006 National Program Committee to help support a minority student who aspires to become a medical librarian to attend the annual meeting. The award was presented to Ivonne Martinez, who attends the School of Information Sciences program at the University of Pittsburgh.

President Tooey introduced Hanne Caspersen, the 2006 Cunningham Fellow. Caspersen is a medical librarian at the Health Sciences Library in Aarhus, Denmark. She arrived in the United States in early March and has traveled throughout the US learning from her colleagues. Caspersen spoke briefly about her experiences and her gratitude to her hosts and MLA for this opportunity.

EBSCO Information Services generously donates funds to provide up to $1,000 each for up to four librarians new to the profession to travel to MLA's Annual Meeting. This year's EBSCO/MLA Grants were awarded to Karen Goodell, reference librarian at the Palmer College of Chiropractic Health Sciences Library in Davenport, Iowa; Lilian Hoffecker, reference and education librarian at the Denison Memorial Library at the University of Colorado–Denver; Xiaoli Li, head of Technical Services at the Carlson Health Sciences Library at the University of California–Davis; and Dana Wyles, family resource librarian at Mt. Sinai Hospital in New York City.

The Hospital Libraries Section sponsors a grant to provide librarians working in hospitals and similar clinical settings with the support needed for educational or research activities. The 2006 Hospital Libraries Section/MLA Professional Development Grant was awarded to Rita Haydar and Joan Wilson. Haydar, manager of the medical library, St. Mary Medical Center in Langhorne, Pennsylvania, used her grant for two courses for the MLA Consumer Health Information Specialization. Wilson, a clinical reference specialist at the Kootenai Medical Center in Coeur d'Alene, Idaho, used her grant to complete an MLA-approved online course in evidence-based medicine.

The David A. Kronick Traveling Fellowship was established in 2001 with an endowment from the Bowden-Massey Foundation. President Tooey noted with sadness the passing away of David A. Kronick this year. It is awarded annually to an MLA member to cover expenses involved in traveling to three or more medical libraries in the US or Canada for the purpose of studying a specific aspect of health information management. This year's recipient was Robin Devin, the health sciences librarian at the University of Rhode Island Library in Kingston. As she serves as the liaison for various allied health programs including physical therapy and nursing, her goal is to observe library operations at four allied health university libraries in the US to expand library collection development and services for the allied health programs with which she works.

The Donald A. B. Lindberg Research Fellowship, established in 2001 with contributions from MLA members and other people and companies in the health care community, is awarded annually through a competitive grant process to a qualified health care professional, researcher, educator, administrator, or librarian. MLA established the fellowship to fund research that links the information services provided by librarians to improved health care and named it in honor of Dr. Lindberg, director of the National Library of Medicine (NLM) since 1984, in recognition of his significant national and international achievements at NLM, the world's largest medical library. The 2006 Fellowship, sponsored by the Mayo Clinic Libraries, was awarded to Indra Neil Sarkar who is employed at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City as a bioinformatics associate. His research aims to develop a federated resource that links biomedical and biodiversity knowledge, as represented in published literature. Specifically, linkages will be sought between centralized indices (e.g., MEDLINE) and recently digitized archives available at the American Museum of Natural History.

The Medical Informatics Section (MIS) of the Medical Library Association first awarded the MIS/MLA Career Development grant in 1997. The section awards up to two individuals $1,500 each to support a career development activity that will contribute to the advancement of the field of medical informatics. The MLA Continuing Education Grant is awarded annually to an MLA member to assist with the development of theoretical, administrative, or technical aspects of medical librarianship. This year's recipient for both awards was Ellen Justice, a medical librarian at the Christiana Hospital Medical Library in Newark, Delaware. She will use the money from both grants towards specialized coursework in evidence-based medicine.

Thomson Scientific sponsors a fellowship of $2,000, which is given every other year to foster and encourage superior students who have been admitted to candidacy to conduct doctoral work in medical librarianship or information science. The 2006 Thomson Scientific/MLA Doctoral Fellowship was awarded to Timothy Hogan, a doctoral candidate at the University of Illinois–Urbana Champaign, who is studying HIV/ AIDS and managing treatment for this disease. His dissertation research is aimed at developing a rich understanding of the information resources and activities associated with HIV/AIDS treatment.

The Estelle Brodman Award for the Academic Medical Librarian of the Year was established with a gift from Irwin H. Pizer and is given to an association member who has made outstanding contributions to academic medical librarianship as demonstrated by excellence in performance, publications, research, service, or a combination thereof. The 2006 Estelle Brodman Award was presented to Linda Walton, associate director of the Galter Health Sciences Library at Northwestern University Medical Center in Chicago, Illinois (now at the University of Iowa, Hardin Library). Tooey noted that Walton exemplifies innovation and leadership in the field of academic medical librarianship. Associate director since 1997, she has instituted numerous projects including the recent Galter Health Smart Library. Funded by an NLM grant, the resource combines technology and vision to resolve perceived patron needs for improved access to relevant health sciences literature. She has received numerous grants for staff development, nurse practitioner recruitment, and education and retention. Linda has also published numerous articles in respected peer reviewed journals and contributes to a number of professional associations including serving as a current MLA Board member, member of the American Medical Association Electronic Publishing Advisory Committee and Doody's Review Service Advisory Committee.

The MLA/Lucretia W. McClure Excellence in Education Award was established in 1998 and first presented in 1999, in honor of one of MLA's most respected members. The award recognizes an outstanding educator in the field of health sciences librarianship and informatics who demonstrates skills in teaching, curriculum development, mentoring, research, or leadership in education at local, regional, or national levels. President Tooey presented the 2006 award to Connie Schardt, education coordinator at Duke University Medical Center Library, Durham, North Carolina, and noted that Schardt has made extensive contributions to the health sciences profession through her teaching and support of the practice of evidence-based medicine. She has developed a core curriculum for teaching EBM to medical students spanning the four-year medical program, has developed and taught a distance education course, EBM and the Medical Librarian, offered at the School of Information Science at the University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill since 1999, and for MLA as a CE course via distance learning. She continues to teach and seek the best teaching methods for medical students, residents, and interns at Duke. Schardt's contributions to the profession at the national level include chairing the task force to develop MLA's Center of Research and Education (CORE), which helped develop the CORE database that is used by medical librarians as a repository for educational materials. Schardt currently serves as a member of the MLA Board of Directors and is also a Distinguished member of the Academy of Health Information Professionals (AHIP). Schardt demonstrates commitment to the role of medical librarianship and has shared her knowledge broadly promoting excellence in education.

The Lois Ann Colaianni Award for Excellence and Achievement in Hospital Librarianship is given to a professional who has made significant contributions to the profession in overall distinction or leadership in hospital library administration or service, has produced a definitive publication related to hospital librarianship, teaching, research, or advocacy or who has developed or applied innovative technology to hospital librarianship. The 2006 recipient was Janet Schneider, hospital librarian at James A. Haley Veterans Hospital in Tampa, Florida. Schneider is a Distinguished member of the academy and is known as a pioneer in consumer health services for libraries. Her areas of expertise include support of consumer health education, shared decision making, health literacy and health promotion for veterans nationwide. She is known as an advocate for patients and patient education, working tirelessly for over twenty-five years to provide the highest quality health information at the hospital.

The Louise Darling Medal for Distinguished Achievement in Collection Development, endowed by Ballen Booksellers, recognizes distinguished achievement in collection development in the health sciences. This year's award was presented to the Core Public Health Journals Project, an extraordinary information resource to aid librarians in developing public health collections. This project created the first ranked list of recommended journals in the important and growing field of public health. The combined expertise of almost forty librarians, including Matthew Wilcox and Kristine Alpi, AHIP, at more than thirty institutions in the US and Canada contributed to bring forth this project. Wilcox accepted the award on behalf of the entire group.

The Thomson Scientific/Frank Bradway Rogers Information Advancement Award is sponsored by Thomson Scientific and recognizes outstanding contributions in the application of technology to the delivery of health sciences information, to the science of information, or to the facilitation of the delivery of health sciences information. The 2006 award was presented to the New York Online Access to Health (NOAH) for delivering one of the first Internet resources developed for consumers that is reliable, easily understood, and provides quality information. The NOAH project was also one of the first in the nation to serve as a consumer health Web portal to meet the growing needs of the Spanish-speaking population. The system was accessed over 461,127 times in 2005, and though it was originally designed as a resource for the New York population, the quality of the information has resulted in a web site with users all over the world, especially in Spanish-speaking countries. President Tooey thanked all of the NOAH members involved in this project and presented the award to Patricia Gallagher, who accepted it on their behalf.

The Majors/MLA Chapter Project of the Year Award recognizes excellence, innovation, and contribution to the profession of health sciences librarianship by an MLA chapter and is sponsored by J. A. Majors. For 2006, the award was presented to the Midcontinental Chapter of the Medical Library Association for its innovative membership project, recruiting members at both the chapter and national level. Marie Reidelbach received the award on behalf of the chapter.

From time to time, the officers and the Board of Directors see that an exceptional contribution has been made to the profession and the goals of the association and, therefore, elect to give the President's Award recognizing the significant contribution. For 2006, the award was presented to Renee Bougard and Janice Kelly in recognition of their valuable contributions to Hurricane Katrina disaster relief on behalf of the association and its members. Renee Bougard is director of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NN/ LM) South Central region and Janice Kelly is director of the NN/LM Southeastern/Atlantic Region. Immediately after the storms, they both arranged clearinghouses for information, established a blog for the South Central regions and chapter through the RML to track MLA members and their needs, and coordinated funding for those in need as they began to rebuild. Bougard and Kelley noted that they were accepting the award on behalf of everyone who helped.

The Ida and George Eliot Prize is presented for a work published in the preceding calendar year, which has been judged most effective in furthering medical librarianship. This year the prize was awarded to Jean Shipman and Sarah Watstein for their article “Emerging Roles of Health Sciences Librarians,” which appeared in two special issues of Reference Services Review. The article exemplified strong “marketing” to help entice new professionals into the profession.

The Murray Gottlieb Prize was established in 1956 by a gift from the Old Hickory Bookshop to recognize and stimulate health sciences librarians' interest in the history of medicine. The 2006 Murray Gottlieb Prize was awarded to Suzanne Shultz, director of library services at the medical library at York Hospital in York, Pennsylvania, for her paper “The Kappa Lambda Society of Hippocrates: A Reconsideration in the Context of Its Time.”

The Rittenhouse Award is presented annually by MLA for the best unpublished paper on health sciences librarianship or medical informatics written by a student in an ALA-accredited program of library and information studies or a trainee in an internship in health sciences librarianship or medical informatics, and is sponsored by the Rittenhouse Book Distributors, King of Prussia, Pennsylvania. This year's recipient was Dolores Skowronek for her paper, “An Ultrasound Digital Library for Anesthesiologists.” Skowronek attends the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee School of Library and Information Science program.

A highlight of each MLA annual meeting is the Janet Doe Lecture on the history or philosophy of medical librarianship. Dr. Julie McGowan, AHIP, FMLA, delivered the 2006 lecture titled, “Swimming With the Sharks: Perspectives on Professional Risk Taking.” McGowan is director of medical libraries and associate dean for Information Resources and Educational Technology at Indiana University School of Medicine–Indianapolis.

President Tooey then announced that the Board of Directors had named five association members as Fellows of the Medical Library Association. Fellows are chosen for their outstanding contributions to health sciences librarianship and to the advancement of the purposes of MLA. President Tooey introduced these five new Fellows as follows:

  • Karen Brewer, AHIP, FMLA: Along with her many awards and accomplishments, Dr. Karen Brewer can now include the prestigious honor of MLA Fellow to the list. Brewer has had a distinguished career in which she has served the Cleveland Health Sciences Library, Oliver Ocasek Regional Medical Information Center, and, over the last fifteen years, as the director and curator of the Ehrman Medical Library at New York University School of Medicine. She has emphasized the role of the library in teaching and research and raised the visibility of the library and the image of the librarian for the entire profession. Brewer has contributed extensively to health sciences librarianship, serving many library associations at the local, regional, and national levels. She served as an MLA Board of Director 1991–1994, Chair of the 1990 MLA Awards Committee, and has held positions in several MLA sections. She is also a Distinguished member of the Academy of Health Information Professionals.
  • Janet Fisher, AHIP, FMLA: I am pleased to welcome Janet Fisher as a Fellow of the association. Fisher has been an active and productive member of MLA for many years and is a member of the academy at the Distinguished level. She has had a notable impact on both the MLA International Cooperative Section (ICS) and the Southern Chapter. Fisher was one of the founders of the MLA ICS Section. In 1989/90 she served on the Transition Task Force for the section and cowrote the transition plan for the committee to become a section. She then served as the first chair of ICS in 1990. Beyond her extensive devotion to ICS, she worked diligently with the Sister Libraries program of MLA from 1999–2003. She has also demonstrated notable leadership to the Southern Chapter of MLA, holding many positions including chair in 2001/02. As one of her colleagues noted, “Janet's lifetime work has furthered MLA's global role, and she has been a true ambassador for our profession.”
  • Nunzia Bettinsoli Giuse, AHIP, FMLA: It is with great pleasure I recognize Dr. Nunzia Giuse as an MLA Fellow. Giuse is director of the Eskind Biomedical Library and professor of bioinformatics and medicine at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, Tennessee. Giuse holds a medical degree as well as a master's in library science. Her contributions to the profession have been sweeping, and she has attained national recognition as a recognized leader in clinical information provision, training health sciences librarians, and integrating librarianship and informatics. On the national level, she currently serves as editor of the JMLA and served as 2002/03 chair of the MLA Medical Informatics Section. Nunzia has a long record of publishing and research and has authored and participated in over 100 papers and presentations. In addition, she has received more than $1.5 million in grant funding for furthering clinical informatics at Vanderbilt University. She is truly a visionary leader.
  • David A. Morse, AHIP, FMLA: Along with the other four Fellows receiving this year's award, David Morse can now add the prestigious Fellow title to his list. Morse has been an MLA member since 1976 and has had a major impact in the area of collection development for biomedical libraries. As mentioned by a colleague, “David is a nationally recognized acquisitions and collection development expert and has shared his knowledge and expertise through numerous presentations at professional meetings and teaching.” Many academic and hospital libraries around the country later adapted his early work in the adoption of the Computerized Acquisitions and Tracking System. He was the founding editor of the Biomedical Libraries Acquisitions Bulletin (BLAB), one of the earliest online newsletters for the field. Through BLAB, collection development librarians across the world have been able to share online valuable ideas and insights for professional collection development. In addition, he played a large role in the establishment of MLA's Collection Development Section and was awarded the prestigious Louise Darling Medal for Distinguished Achievement in Collection Development in 1995.
  • Mary Ryan, AHIP, FMLA: I am pleased to welcome Mary Ryan as an MLA Fellow. Ryan is director of the University of Arkansas Medical Sciences Library in Little Rock. She has demonstrated over the course of thirty-three years in the profession, leadership and achievement with increasingly responsible positions along the way. In her current position as a tenured professor, Ryan has expanded her work into the field of public health, concentrating on consumer health information resources and outreach. She has been involved in building ARHealthLINK, a consumer health Website for the state of Arkansas. She has extensive grants experience and has presented over fifty papers, presentations, posters, and classes. Ryan has achieved Distinguished member status in the Academy of Health Information Professional and in 2004 earned her master's in public health with honors from the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences.

President Tooey concluded the session by saying that each year, the awards ceremony and luncheon serves as an important reminder of the numerous accomplishments our peers have made to the profession. It simultaneously provides the encouragement to continue aspiring towards higher levels of achievement. In recognizing these individuals, we affirm the ‘best and brightest’ in the field of health sciences librarianship.

BUSINESS MEETING I

Monday, May 22, 2006

President Tooey opened the first business meeting of 2006 at 10:30 a.m. with the playing of a second Spirit of Community: Hurricane Katrina segment. She then introduced MLA Executive Director Carla J. Funk.

Funk introduced the members of the MLA Board of Directors: President MJ Tooey, AHIP, President-elect Jean Shipman, AHIP, Immediate Past-President Joanne Gard Marshall, AHIP, FMLA, Treasurer Dixie Jones, AHIP, Chapter Council Chair Sarah Gable, AHIP, Section Council Chair Tovah Reis, and Directors: Margaret Bandy, AHIP, Nancy Clemmons, AHIP, Craig Haynes, Rosalind Lett, AHIP, Faith Meakin, AHIP, and Connie Schardt, AHIP. Appointed officers: Lucretia McClure, AHIP, FMLA, parliamentarian, and Linné Girouard, AHIP, sergeant-at-arms. Funk also recognized the members who serve in various editorial positions on behalf of the association: Melissa Just, AHIP, MLANET editor; Nunzia Giuse, AHIP, FMLA, editor of the Journal of the Medical Library Association and Linda Katz, AHIP, editor of the MLA News.

President Tooey then asked the audience to join her in a moment of silence to honor the memories of these MLA members who died during the year: Marguerite Emerson Abel, Eustace H. Cornelius, Rosanne Labree Coursen, AHIP, James L. Finnerty, Colin William (Bill) Fraser, FMLA, Maxyne Grimes, Nancy Rothschild Hill, Samuel W. Hitt, FMLA, T. Mark Hodges, AHIP, FMLA, Virginia Holtz, AHIP, FMLA, Linda Nannette King, David A. Kronick, AHIP, FMLA, Jane Annis Lambremont, FMLA, Pamela Lee, AHIP, Joseph Leiter, AHIP, FMLA, Marjan Merala, Suzanne H. Murray, Elizabeth Jean Pakan, Eleonor Pasmik, Jean Williams Sayre, AHIP, Judith C. Wilkerson.

Funk then recognized the considerable time and effort expended by chapter chairs, section chairs, special interest group (SIG) chairs, committee and task force chairs, and MLA representatives to allied organizations.

President Tooey recognized new members who bring to the association new ideas and energy and are an important source for future leaders and announced that since the 2005 annual meeting, 444 new members have joined the association.

President Tooey then called to order Business Meeting I of the MLA '06 annual meeting and asked if the quorum required for transaction of business was present. After Sergeant-at-Arms Girouard confirmed that more than 250 of the voting members represented in the assembly were present, the president called on Secretary Rosalind Lett to move adoption of the Rules of the Assembly.

Lett explained that the Rules of the Assembly include information on addressing the chair, presenting motions, debating, and voting and are available on MLANET. At the direction of the Board of Directors, she moved that the Rules of the Assembly as they appear on MLANET be adopted. Voting paddles were raised and, there being a majority in the affirmative, the Rules of the Assembly were adopted.

Lett noted that the agendas for the 2006 business meetings were on pages 27 and 32 of the Official Program. Also, as the order of the agenda for Business Meeting II had been revised, copies of the revised agenda were being distributed that day and the next. By direction of the Board of Directors, Lett moved that the revised agendas for the 2006 business meetings of the Medical Library Association be adopted. Again, the vote was affirmative and the revised agendas adopted.

President Tooey explained that in November 2005, ballots for MLA's election of 2006/07 officers, Board of Directors, and Nominating Committee were sent electronically or by postal service to all eligible voting members of MLA. There were 1,354 valid ballots returned from 3,301 eligible members, a participation rate of 41%. She noted that 1,316 ballots came via Web voting and 38 paper ballots were returned by mail. On December 15, 2005, the election results were certified by Christopher M. Keran and Kimberlee Ann Smith from Survey & Ballot Systems of Eden Prairie, Minnesota, the firm MLA contracted with to conduct the election. The election results were announced in the February 2006 issue of the MLA News, and complete election results, including vote totals, were published in the 2005/06 annual report which is available on MLANET.

Election results: President-Elect: Mark E. Funk, AHIP. MLA Board of Directors (three-year terms): T. Scott Plutchak, AHIP, and Linda Walton. Nominating Committee: Margaret (Peg) Allen, AHIP, Diana J. Cunningham, AHIP, Rosalind Dudden, AHIP, FMLA, Gale Dutcher, Gary Freiburger, AHIP, Terry Ann Jankowski, AHIP, Janice Kelly, Jett McCann, AHIP, Mary Fran Prottsman, AHIP. Joanne Marshall, AHIP, FMLA, will chair the Nominating Committee.

For the first item of new business, President Tooey called on Dixie Jones to present the Treasurer's Report.

Dixie Jones: “The best things in life are free” according to The Beatles lyric. That may be true, but the association cannot run on love, babies' little chubby feet, sunsets, puppies, kittens, breathtaking views, the first flowers of spring, cold water on a hot day, or mama's cooking. It takes a few bucks to keep the association going. As many of you know, the fiscal year for MLA runs on a calendar basis while the association year for officers and committees runs from annual meeting to annual meeting. So, today, the treasurer's report is actually looking at two years.

First, a glance back at 2005. As the Sinatra song says, “It was a very good year.” The association had better-than-expected net revenue of $133,062. This good news can be attributed to the dues increase, ad sales in publications, and last year's annual meeting. We owe our gratitude to you, the members, in supporting this phased dues increase a few years ago, to our vendors who provided revenue through ad space and at our annual meeting, and all those who were involved in the success of last year's meeting in San Antonio. About a third of this revenue will go into association financial reserves. The Board of Directors has discussed how to apply the other two-thirds to benefit members and the profession, and suggested the following priorities:

  • matching donations for hurricane relief (up to $20,000)
  • the redesign of MLANET
  • updating the association management system, which includes the membership database
  • contribution to the Morton Bursary fund
  • a $25,000 contribution to the Lindberg fund to help achieve full endowment
  • President-elect Jean Shipman's research project
  • repaying investment loss in endowment funds

The audited year-end financial analysis for 2005 is posted at www.mlanet.org/members/organization/hq_docs.html.

Now for a look at 2006: a deficit is expected. The revenues shown on this pie chart are projected to total about $2,993,400. The largest source of income for the association is not dues but the annual meeting. The expenses shown here are expected to total about $3,011,200. Again, the annual meeting is the largest share of the pie. As published in the April issue of MLA News, the expenses are projected to be $17,800 over the revenues in this calendar year. This planned deficit is allowable as long as the reserves equal a minimum of 30% of annual expenditures. The expenses for 2006 may be attributed to several new initiatives, the major one being a research project on the value of health sciences librarians' contributions. Other initiatives for this year include:

  • the Vital Pathways Project for hospital librarians
  • redesign of MLANET
  • production of three new disease-specific Medspeak brochures
  • a DVD on health sciences librarianship as a career
  • Librarians without Borders disaster relief
  • a spring meeting of the Task Force on Educational Policy Statement Revision
  • and, the new association management system

So … to quote another song, “You don't get something for nothing.” These worthwhile projects bear costs and they have been incorporated into the budget for 2006 with approval from the Board of Directors.

Have you ever thought about the disparity between the waltz, “Love Makes the World Go Round” and the song from Cabaret in which Joel Grey disputes that notion by chanting, “Money makes the world go around?” Regardless of what makes the world go around, we know what The Beatles told us. “Money can't buy … love,” but for those of us who love our profession and our association, financial sustenance is certainly necessary to provide all the benefits that we expect as members and to fund timely initiatives that support our membership and our profession.

Next, President Tooey called on Carla Funk to give the Executive Director's Report.

Funk: On behalf of MLA staff, let me welcome everyone to MLA 2006. This has been a transformational year for MLA headquarters, too. Let me begin with the transformative powers of funding. As you just heard from Dixie, MLA had a very strong financial year due to the dues increase, an excellent annual meeting, and strong publications and advertising revenues. Contributions from the membership, corporate partners, and other vendors totaled over $100,000 this year, and awards and other financial support for educational and minority scholarship programs from the National Network of Libraries of Medicine also exceeded $100,000. We received over $30,000 in additional revenue thanks to the dues increase. This funding helped us to provide enhanced programs and services this year and will enable us to transform our association management system to a Web-based system and add services that members have been requesting. It will also allow us to redesign MLANET based upon comments from the MLANET survey that almost 700 of you responded to, as well as information gleaned from the focus groups here at the annual meeting. It has enabled us to match medical library disaster relief donations as MJ described and will fund even more research to assist our members in this increasingly challenging health care and information environment.

As you know, MLA established the Medical Library Disaster Relief Fund soon after Hurricane Katrina to assist those in the medical library community who had been impacted by not only Katrina, but also Hurricanes Rita and Wilma. Sections, chapters, and members have donated over $14,000 to the fund to date. MLA is matching these donations, and so far we have awarded over $15,000 to individuals and libraries impacted by the hurricanes. MLA has also waived dues for 2006 for those in the hurricane-impacted areas to help them keep professionally involved with their friends and colleagues during this time.

I know that these events have stimulated a number of our members to develop or revise their disaster recovery plans. MLA revised its plan in 2005/06 to include several recovery scenarios for our electronic files and databases based upon the level of the disaster. We also enhanced our communications plan by adding staff and board cell phone information and home emails and have practiced evacuating the office with the assistance and encouragement of the Chicago Fire Department.

During the past year, MLA headquarters staff has also undergone some changes and celebrated anniversaries: Susan Talmage, MLA's copy editor will soon have a transformational experience—expecting the birth of her second child this summer; Bleu Caldwell left MLA to transform herself into a chef. Elizabeth Rodriguez took Bleu's place as MLA's new graphics designer and is responsible for many of the brochures, the annual meeting logo and design, and other materials at this meeting. We transformed Deb Cavanaugh, CE associate, into a full-time employee to meet the increasing needs of MLA's continuing education program. Kathleen Combs, coordinator, Continuing Education, Beverly Bradley, coordinator of Membership Services, and Larry Jones, mailroom, celebrated significant MLA anniversaries in 2005. Kathleen has been with MLA for ten years and Beverly and Larry celebrated their five-year anniversaries. Several staff are transforming themselves through CE opportunities: Lynanne Feilen, director of publications, is completing coursework in the Academy for Nonprofit Excellence at a local community college; Ray Naegele, director of finance and administration, was able to attend the American Society of Association Executives' Great Ideas Conference to continue his professional development, and Lisa Fried, coordinator, credentialing, professional recognition, and career services, has attended several continuing education sessions sponsored by the Association Forum of Chicagoland.

MLA continues to transform its programs and services to help our members and others keep up with the ever-changing health information environment. This year, MLA had the largest number of participants in continuing education since 2002, with over 8,500 people taking advantage of CE opportunities sponsored or approved by MLA. Through our symposia, we have highlighted the potential transformative powers of medical librarians on topics ranging from the role of information services for emergency preparedness and response to patient safety and serving diverse users. MLA also expanded its range of course offerings and opportunities for the profession by offering more Webcasts, enabling individuals to take MLA CE courses at their desktops. We also worked to increase the association's ability to provide Web-based instruction by offering our first ever week-long CE Institute on Developing Web-Based Instruction. Seventeen scholars—eight from MLA and nine from NLM's National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NN/ LM)—attended the institute, ably taught by Scott Garrison and his team. The scholars worked to transform their face-to-face courses into Web-based courses and we hope to see the fruits of their labors by the end of September 2006. The institute would not have been possible without funding from the NN/LM Greater Midwest Region, and we are very appreciative of their support.

Working with the Task Force to Revise the Educational Policy Statement, MLA is in the process of transforming Platform for Change to reflect the current health sciences librarian environment and the knowledge and skills necessary for professional success. Please attend the open forum on Tuesday to comment on the draft statement.

MLA is helping to transform librarianship through the association's support and sponsorship of projects that explore new roles and promote recruitment and diversity in the profession. Over the past year, MLA signed letters of support for the following IMLS grant proposals:

  • University of North Carolina: Future of Librarians in the Workforce
  • University of North Carolina/Duke University: Recruiting medical students into a new dual-degree master's program that will train them in both biomedical and information and library science subjects
  • Johns Hopkins and other medical libraries: Bringing medical librarians, informaticians, and diversity counselors together to increase the number of under-represented minorities entering health information professions
  • University of North Carolina: Transforming Librarianship through Evidence-Based Library and Information Practice
  • University of Pittsburgh: WISE + Leveraging the Power of the Network to Increase the Diversity of Library and Information Science Curriculum to help the next generation of librarians to have easier access to graduate and continuing education.

MLA continues to support exploration into new roles for health information professionals with the publication of the report “Envisioning the Information Specialist in Context” completed by MLA's consultants on the project, the Eskind Biomedical Library, Vanderbilt University. The full report can be found at www.mlanet.org/members/organization/unit_docs.html#tf_reports. An open forum on the topic is also being held at this year's annual meeting.

In the area of membership recruitment and retention, we have continued to work to bring new professionals into health sciences librarianship and new members into the association. The Professional Recruitment and Retention Ad Hoc Committee (PRRC) and staff members Lisa Fried and Beverly Bradley developed a new recruitment DVD that can be used by members for presentations at graduate schools of library and information science, career fairs, and other events. We will be distributing copies to the graduate schools and to the regional medical libraries. If you would like one of these DVDs, please pick it up at the Member Resource Center. The DVD will also be available on MLANET to show to classes and others. Also, the PRRC developed FAQs to help those interested in medical librarianship to learn about the profession. These are posted on the career area of MLANET. Staff also distributed 2,500 career brochures, attended career fairs, and published four career articles on medical librarianship.

We continue to work on bringing more diversity into the profession. We are now supporting two Spectrum Scholars and want to thank the South Central Region of the NN/LM for the additional award to be able to do this. We also want to thank the 2006 NPC for donating a minority scholarship to support attendance at this annual meeting.

And last but not least, we also want to thank the Membership Committee for having its second annual membership phone-a-thon in January. Almost 600 lapsed members were called, resulting in more than 60 members for MLA.

MLANET continues to be used by the public as well as the medical library community with over 30 million hits in 2005. The number of visits to the site has also doubled over last year. This year, with the assistance of PCI, MLA's public relations firm, and our members, MLA developed three new disease-specific brochures for consumers on diabetes, breast cancer, and heart disease. You received copies of these brochures in your portfolios at this annual meeting. These join the already successful Medspeak brochure that was distributed throughout the state of Rhode Island this year thanks to an NLM award to the Rhode Island Hospital and Brown University. We hope in the future to transform these into low-literacy brochures to meet the needs of a broader audience.

Since April 2005, there have been 31 media placements in journals, magazines, and newspapers in both print and electronic form, on radio, and on TV, reaching an estimated audience of 30,901,793 on topics ranging from the top health websites, health literacy, consumer health resources, and the value of medical librarians to health care providers.

To keep you better informed about MLA's other advocacy activities, we've added a public policy section to MLA-FOCUS that regularly highlights our activities in the governmental relations area and leads you to the relevant parts of MLANET for more information. MLA also continues to work with the Governmental Relations Committee (GRC), the Joint Legislative Task Force, our Washington representatives, the Health and Medicine Counsel of Washington, the Library Copyright Alliance, and the Information Access Alliance on copyright and scholarly publishing and other legislative issues. At the MLA Connections Booth at this meeting we have copies of documents we prepared on proposed changes to Section 108 of the copyright law, the closing of the EPA libraries, the NIH reauthorization bill, NLM funding, and the proposed Federal Research Public Access Act. MLA is actively involved in the transformation of scholarly publishing through the work of our Scholarly Publishing Task Force and participation over the past year in the open access working group, an initiative of the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition, or SPARC. The medical library community was successful in getting a representative, Pat Thibodeau, appointed to the NIH Public Access Working Group in 2005, which has helped us get our voice heard on this topic. We also are collaborating with the Society for Scholarly Publishing (SSP) and MLA's Scholarly Publishing Task Force to keep the lines of communication open between publishers and medical librarians, and we are having a focus group on scholarly publishing with SSP after the conclusion of this annual meeting.

In the area of research, MLA published results of several surveys this year, including the Hay Group/ MLA Salary Survey; the second benchmarking study; an MLANET survey to get member opinion about the usability and redesign of the association's website; an MLA News readership survey to discover new directions for the newsletter; and a survey on open access on behalf of the Scholarly Publishing Task Force. As part of the Vital Pathways Project, we have also distributed a hospital library survey to our members and to the medical library community at large. We were able to support these surveys using newly purchased survey software. All of our survey results give us valuable information about trends in the profession and the opinions of our members help us transform MLA programs and services. We appreciate all those who have made their voices heard.

The Task Force to Revise the Research Policy Statement is also hard at work transforming the current statement, “Using Scientific Evidence to Improve Information Practice,” to fit the ever changing world of health information research. The revision should be completed next year. Again, please attend the open forum on Tuesday to provide your comments on this important document.

The MLA News and Journal of the Medical Library Association (JMLA) are in a continual process of transformation. All of our editorships went through transformations this year: Nunzia Giuse and her Vanderbilt team took over for Scott Plutchak as editor of JMLA; Linda Katz took over for Beverly Murphy as editor of the MLA News, and Mary Piorun took over for Valerie Rankow as MEDLIB-L coordinator.

The online MLA News now has a running monthly index of content. We have almost 400 JMLA subscribers that want JMLA in electronic form only. For those people, we send out an electronic table of contents to alert them to a new issue. Some of the JMLA content that previously appeared in the print version, such as the proceedings of MLA's annual meeting, will now appear in the electronic version only. This will enable us to publish more research and other information that our members and others will find useful. Also, an online symposium, “Mapping the Literature of Nursing,” is our first electronic-only symposium to appear in the electronic version of JMLA. We will also begin to publish “online only” supplemental data content on a regular basis.

MLA Publishing published one new book and one new DocKit this year. These included: Using PDAs in Libraries: A How-to-Do-It Manual, by Colleen Cuddy and Position Descriptions in Health Sciences Libraries (MLA DocKit #15) by Jane Blumenthal, Vani Murthy, Ivonne Martinez, and Laura Silver.

MLA continues to transform our annual meeting processes as well. For the 2006 meeting, 65% of annual meeting registrants registered online. This year exhibitors were able to enter badge information online for the first time, and the NPC sponsored an annual meeting blog. Also, the attendee evaluation for this meeting will be done electronically after the meeting, so please watch for the email. We believe that this will result in higher response rates and make the data easier to compile.

As part of MLA's international program, we are piloting a transformation of the Cunningham Fellowship so that MLA is able to invite more medical librarians to come to the US. Based upon the Global Initiatives Task Force report, we have titled our international program “Librarians without Borders: an MLA Global Initiative,” and have service-marked the name in the US. At the MLA Connections Booth, we have copies of the new Sister Libraries Tips brochure created by the task force with the assistance of the International Cooperation Section and the American Library Association. I am also happy to report that Librarians without Borders has been included in NLM's strategic long-range plan for 2006–2016.

Staff and members attended library conferences on three continents this year, including the 2005 International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) conference and exhibit in Oslo, Norway, where we distributed materials about MLA, and also co-sponsored a satellite meeting at IFLA on open access with the European Association for Health Information and Libraries and others. MLA also exhibited at Canadian Health Libraries Association/Association des bibliothèques de la santé du Canada (CHLA/ABSC) in Vancouver, British Columbia, and at the Ninth Congress on International Medical Librarianship in Salvador, Bahia, Brazil. MLA is also working with its sister associations and IFLA to find ways to assist the library community in the countries devastated by the tsunami in December 2004 through the US Associations Library Disaster Relief Fund.

I want to thank headquarters' staff for all of their hard work this year on behalf of the association. On behalf of headquarters' staff, I want to thank you all for your hard work, and donations of your time, energy, and money to make this a successful year for MLA. This year's success would also not have been possible without strong support from the president, board, committees, task forces, sections, SIGs, and chapters. Thank you. And last, but not least, I want to thank our very own transformer, AZ, for accompanying us on many of our travels this year. If you would like to take AZ home, please purchase a raffle ticket at the Scholarship Booth. As you can see, he's developed some powerful friends.

President Tooey returned to the podium and moved on to the next order of business, the annual report. In the interest of time, she received the annual reports in a block. The informational reports of the appointed officials, the councils, the committees, the representatives, the chapters, and the sections can be found in the 2005/06 Annual Report of the Medical Library Association. The report is posted on MLANET (www.mlanet.org/about/annual_report/05_06/) and will remain available there throughout the year. Reports are also available in paper copy by request from the Executive Director's Office. There being no corrections or amendments from the members, the reports were filed as presented.

President Tooey then introduced Dr. Timothy B. Patrick, 2004 recipient of the Donald A. B. Lindberg Research Fellowship and assistant professor, Health Administration and Informatics, University of Wisconsin College of Health Sciences–Milwaukee, who reported on his study funded by the fellowship, “Evidence-based Information Retrieval in Bioinformatics.”

Dr. Patrick: The overall, long-term goal of this research project is to contribute to evidence-based information retrieval in post-genomic medicine. That a biomedical endeavor is evidence-based, no matter whether it is focused on patient care or on the discovery of gene function, implies that both its decision making and its retrieval of information are evidence-based. Evidence-based decision making addresses the need to base decisions, whether they concern patient care or discovery of gene function, on the results of prior scientific study. Evidence-based information retrieval, on the other hand, addresses the necessary prior step of having proof of the effectiveness of the way particular information resources are used and combined in order to retrieve that evidence. The project has three specific aims:

  • Specific aim 1: Determine existing pitfalls in accessing literature on gene function
  • Specific aim 2: Determine the current state of evidence-based functional genomic retrieval based on user warrant
  • Specific aim 3: Determine the current state of evidence-based functional genomic retrieval based on literary warrant

The first aim, to determine existing pitfalls in accessing literature on gene function, is the topic of our talk later today, “Asymmetries in Retrieval of Gene Function Information” [1]. In that study we compared three different paths to literature on gene function that might appear to be equivalent to a user who lacks knowledge of the metadata about the information resources used (Figure 1).

Figure 1
Three different paths to literature on gene function

Each path starts from a micro array experiment, so we want to first talk a little about micro arrays. Micro arrays can be used to determine gene expression under experimental and control conditions. Each cell in a micro array holds copies of short strands of DNA called probes. The probes are used to identify particular genes. The micro array is used “… to help researchers identify what RNA sequences are present in [an experimental or control] sample, and this then tells them how strongly those genes are being expressed by that cell” [2]. The micro array is washed with RNA, which has been treated to fluoresce when treated with a stain. The expression level of the genes is indicated by the brightness of the resulting glow. The results of the micro array experiment are statistically analyzed to determine which genes are significantly expressed. In the workflows we consider, there is a representative DNA sequence related to the probes for a gene, and that is what is used to search for primary literature about the gene function.

Each path starts from a micro array experiment, gets the Genbank Accession numbers of the representative sequences of expressed genes, and uses those accession numbers to search for primary literature that may shed some light on the function of the genes. To compare the three paths, we collected the representative DNA accession numbers associated with genes expressed in a micro array experiment (NIH grant AG18881) designed to identify changes in gene expression associated with skeletal muscle recovery from immobilization-induced sarcopenia [3–5]. Next, we retrieved the Unique Identifiers (UI's) of Entrez PubMed citations that were associated with the accession numbers by each of the three Entrez resources, directly in the case of Entrez PubMed and indirectly, via PubMed links in the case of Entrez Nucleotide and Entrez Gene. Next, we compared the number of PubMed ID's retrieved by the three resources for each of the accession numbers. We analyzed that data with Kendall's W. The results showed that the result sets produced by the three paths were significantly different at P < .05. In other words, these three different paths are not equivalent, in that they do not produce the same results.

The point is that a user lacking knowledge of the metadata about the resources (i.e., indexing and other structural features) might have considered the paths equivalent. An example of such key documentation is the brief statement in the Entrez-PubMed documentation that “[t]he SI field and the Entrez sequence database links are not linked” [6], which suggests that the “direct to PubMed” path and the nucleotide path would not be equivalent.

The work on the second aim, “Based on user warrant, determine the current state of evidence-based functional genomic retrieval,” is in progress. In this project, we interview biologists who use micro arrays for gene expression studies and ask them questions about what methods for IR are used, why they consider the methods effective, what are criteria of success and failure, and how they see the role of biomedical librarians in the process. We currently have five interviews scheduled for University of Missouri–Columbia, we are scheduling interviews at University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee, and we have interviewed two subjects at the National Institute of Genetics in Japan. We also have ten interviews that we did previously at the University of Missouri-Columbia and elsewhere.

Our third aim was “Based on literary warrant, determine the current state of evidence-based functional genomic retrieval.” In this project we wanted to investigate how and to what extent biological science researchers reported their information retrieval methods, including details of why they used the methods they did [7]. We searched OVID MEDLINE on October 1, 2004, for the period 1966 to September Week 4 2004 with the query “Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis,” which produced 10,746 results. We then limited the results to English (10,374), excluded “review articles” (9,049), and limited to the years 2003– 2004 (4,798). We next ranked journals in the results by number of articles, and selected a population of all of the articles from the 13 top journals (n = 1,373). We randomly sampled 150 articles from that population. If the authors of the paper did report gene function, we wanted to know which information sources and retrieval methods they used, as well as the reasons they had for using them. So we classified the relevant articles with respect to the categories “Functional Attribution Reported,” “Sources of Information Reported,” “Retrieval Strategy Reported,” “Grounds for Choice of Sources Reported,” “Grounds for Retrieval Strategy Reported.” Furthermore, we were interested in how details of the sources and retrieval methods they used were reported in the paper. Thus, when details of the information sources and retrieval methods used were discussed, we noted the sections of the paper in which they were discussed. For example, we noted whether information retrieval methods were discussed in the Methods or Procedures section, the Results section, or the Discussion section. Typical evidence for attribution of gene function consists of literature citations. When a literature search (e.g., PubMed search) or a search of other knowledge sources (e.g., NCBI databases) is cited as the source of evidence to support attribution of function, rarely are details of the search reported, certainly not in a level of detail that would allow repeatability. Reasons for using sources and retrieval methods are also not reported. Interestingly, when information retrieval methods are described in the paper, even in detail, they are typically mentioned only in the Results or Discussion sections of the paper, and not in the Methods section. Even perhaps more interesting is that wet bench methods are reported in much more detail than dry bench methods.

There are three implications for information practice suggested by our studies.

  • There is a need to embrace a workflow concept
  • There is a need to develop standards for documentation in e-science
  • There is a need to use multidisciplinary teams to develop workflows

We maintain the first implication because workflows are increasingly important in the life sciences. A scenario of information retrieval and processing that involves the use of multiple information resources, databases, and analysis tools in combination (like the three paths to the literature that we examined earlier) is called a workflow.

The second implication is that there is a need to develop standards for documentation in e-science. It is commonly suggested, and presumably it is true, that we are witness to the ongoing digitization of science, with computer based information retrieval and processing methods increasingly being incorporated into the day-to-day doings of traditional science. Embracing information processing and retrieval workflows in the life sciences requires that we have clear constraints on the quality (e.g., peer review) of those workflows, as well as assurance of repeatability of methods and results. For this we need documentation of the details of the workflow. In order to achieve the level of documentation that is required for quality and repeatability of methods and results with any very complicated workflow, we need to develop technology to facilitate the documentation. But in addition to the technology for capturing and managing provenance records as in, for example, the Taverna system [8], there must also be policy drivers, particularly editorial policy drivers, to insure the level of documentation of methods and results required for quality and repeatability.

The third implication for information practice is that there is a need to use multidisciplinary teams to develop workflows. A typical situation in which workflows might be developed would be one in which we have primary information resources and items, various tools for accessing or manipulating that information, metadata describing the primary information and tools, and then workflows that use the primary information and tools, where the design of the workflow is based in part of knowledge of the primary information and in part on knowledge of the metadata. In order to construct workflows, both kinds of expertise are required. The domain expert is needed to provide the scientific basis for the workflow design, and the information specialist is needed for his or her expertise in the metadata of the domain. The information specialists (e.g., librarians) do not need to become experts in biology, that is, experts in the primary information and tools. But they do need to be experts in the metadata of biology.

President Tooey returned to the podium to close Business Meeting I. She reminded attendees that the second business session would be on Tuesday, May 23, which would include recognition of outgoing board members, introduction of incoming board members, the invitation to MLA '07 and the inaugural address of President-Elect Jean Shipman.

BUSINESS MEETING II: PRESIDENTIAL INAUGURAL ADDRESS AND MLA '07 INVITATION

Tuesday, May 23, 2006

President MJ Tooey welcomed everyone and began the morning's session with a viewing of the last of the three In the Spirit of Community: Hurricane Katrina segments. After the video was played, President Tooey called the meeting to order. She reminded everyone that the three of the In the Spirit of Community vignettes will be available on MLANET. She announced that this session was the conclusion of the association's business for 2005/06. A quorum of voting members was present.

President Tooey then recognized and thanked the retiring MLA board members, Nancy Clemmons, AHIP, and Rosalind Lett, AHIP. They were presented with certificates as tokens of respect and gratitude for work well done. Next, President Tooey expressed her sincere gratitude to retiring Immediate Past-President Joanne Marshall, president of MLA during the 2004/ 05 association year. She was presented with a certificate and a plaque.

The new members of the MLA Board of Directors, T. Scott Plutchak, AHIP, Linda Walton, and President-elect Mark Funk, AHIP, were then welcomed and introduced. President Tooey proceeded to introduce the incoming president, Jean Shipman. Incoming president Shipman presented Tooey with the presidential cup and congratulated her on an outstanding year on behalf of the association.

Jean P. Shipman, AHIP, director of the Tompkins-McCaw Library of the Health Sciences and associate university librarian, Virginia Commonwealth University Libraries in Richmond, Virginia, 2006/07 MLA president, delivered the inaugural address.

INAUGURAL ADDRESS

Good morning! What a privilege it is to stand before you as your next president of MLA! I am truly honored by your support and vote of confidence, and I look forward to a year full of activity, professional advancement, and fun! In other words, I plan on continuing to “Get High on MLA.”

Why this title you ask? Well, it is based on my exposure to general aviation, which is my husband's primary hobby. He is a private pilot and is responsible for my learning about the world of flying, or “getting high.” There are a lot of parallels between flying and our profession that I will share throughout this talk. But let me start by saying that during my first encounter with Mark, my husband, there were two main things that solidified the start of our relationship. The first was that I wasn't afraid of flying (probably would have been a deal breaker for Mark if I had been) and second, how genuinely excited Mark became when I told him I was a medical librarian. I didn't get the usual response, “you must like to read” or “how interesting [yawn]; I like books too!” He really thought my being a librarian was neat! What can I say; we were intrigued by each other's worlds and “getting high” continues to be something we share. Mark, with his flying passion, and me, with my dedication and excitement about our profession and MLA!

But let me step back a minute. As I recall MJ stating in her inaugural address, I also spent a lot of time thinking about what to cover in this talk, as there is so much I want to express. To prepare, I talked with chapter and section chairs about their needs and interests. I reviewed past presidential priorities, themes, and speeches and I realized that I am following some terrific leaders! The collective vision, initiatives, and wisdom of our previous MLA presidents (eighty-five to be exact) are mind-boggling. What do you get when you put the key focuses of the past seven presidents together? You get, “Transforming Magnifico Values via Investing Extreme Passion and Commitment.”

Doesn't this say it all? What a foundation to build on! I'd like for us to thank these presidents again for leading us so ably! I'd like to have them stand and please join me in a round of applause for their contributions.

Speaking of foundations, my year as president ends with the 2007 meeting in Philadelphia. Having our meeting in the keystone state, Pennsylvania (my home state), and in Philadelphia, MLA's founding city and site of the association's first annual meeting in May 1898, provides us with a unique opportunity to spend the next year revisiting our founding premises and values in order to reclaim our foundations and forge new frontiers. In aviation terms, this means we need to use our well-honed and practiced skills and map our future route via a flight plan. Like a pilot, we need to guide each activity with the simple sounding yet complex rules of “ANC” that every pilot learns as basics: A–Aviate (have the skills to apply to the business at hand), N–Navigate (know where we are and where we want to go), and C–Communicate (share with others our expertise and key values—advocate for our profession).

Personally, I don't have any problem remembering this acronym because I took a “pinch-hitters” course, where I learned flying basics and emergency procedures in the event I ever needed to take control of an airplane. After seventeen landings (one of which was smooth; but then any time you walk away from a landing, it is good), I learned to be “antsy” if I ever did need to pinch hit for Mark. Flying in landing patterns with the big guys, C130s that deploy freight and troops quickly, taught me that I needed to develop my flying skills. What the course also taught me was how to become a back-seat driver as I soon critiqued Mark's flying habits much to his chagrin.

My presidential priorities follow this ANC model as well.

A–Aviate: Pilots use a lot of instrumentation to judge their positioning and to set their directions. Sometimes when I watch my husband rely solely on such instrumentation, I get jealous. Yes, I do call the airplane that we own, the mistress, but that's not why I get jealous. I get jealous because there is the immediate ability to judge the airplane's current position, where it is heading, and how well it is doing in getting there. One particular gauge is called an “attitude indicator.” (Can you imagine having one of these at work?) This indicator gives a direct and immediate picture of pitch attitude and bank angle. On quick glance, you can see how the airplane measures up against the horizon. This gauge is vital for maintaining the pitch and bank of the plane when the horizon is not visible because of cloudy conditions. Wouldn't it be nice to have one of these types of gauges to measure the horizon of scholarly communications?

We need to emphasize our skill set and professional values. What is it that makes us unique as a profession and what difference does our profession make? What constitutes our professional training and core competencies? Many MLA initiatives are examining these various issues and more will be instituted. Here are some examples:

  • Our role with graduate medical education, in both academic and hospital settings, is being quantified and qualified. We know that we aid in the training of health care professionals, but we need to solidify our roles by educating and contributing to the future development of the health care workforce.
  • While we offer assistance to our peers and colleagues to explore and discover their intellectual contributions, we need to further our own knowledgebase through the expansion and continued development of MLA's Center of Research and Education, or CORE, started by Past-President Carol Jenkins. How many of you have submitted items for this database? Let's chart our collective knowledge through documentation so that we can easily discover what each other are doing and share our intellectual resources with one another.
  • Revisiting and revising our two key white paper documents on education and research through the work of Joanne Marshall's appointed task forces will ensure that we retain and transform our skill sets, as the working world requires. Not only are we learning what key training is needed to be a productive medical librarian of tomorrow, but we are creating “flight plans” for implementing such training and for conducting needed research to prove our value and to forge new discovery frontiers. We need to work with our educators to ensure that library and information science schools incorporate the teaching of identified skills. I will continue visiting library schools, started by MJ, and I hope to talk with at least two additional schools in the coming year.
  • MLA will continue to offer continuing education opportunities in multiple formats that will help us learn new technologies that enable mobile practice as well as other evolving skills. Many MLA courses are being transformed into Web-based ones for easier access and self-guided instruction.

As president, I hope to illustrate our vital role in improving the nation's (and other countries') health literacy. As librarians, we are keenly aware of the importance of information and its application to one's personal health. We know that understanding leads to empowerment and better patient treatment and compliance outcomes. We need to prove this to hospital administrators who are very familiar with “return on investment” and “show me the money” evidence-based practice. Under my leadership, MLA plans to hire a consultant who will do a return on investment study of how librarians directly contribute to patient success and ultimately, a healthier public.

Health literacy is the priority of two national scientific leaders, US Surgeon General Richard M. Carmona and National Academy of Science President Bruce Alberts. A 2005 public health journal article, entitled “Public Health Literacy in America: An Ethical Imperative,” stated, “The momentum of the movement [health literacy] is evident. What is needed now is the synthesis of these efforts, a consensus to require health literacy training in medical and all healthcare professional education and a sharing of expertise across disciplines to bring the issue to the forefront of public health.” In the recent American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA) and American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA) report, “Building the Work Force for Health Information Transformation,” there is a call from these organizations to others to “help to mitigate health literacy issues, especially those related to health information.” Shouldn't we be the ones to answer this call for assistance?

I would like for MLA to take a lead role nationally and internationally in educating health care providers about health literacy, and initiate conversations with standards-setting organizations and accrediting agencies such as JCAHO and Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) to make health literacy a core competency in the same mode as cultural competencies are being required. MLA could develop a Web-based educational tutorial to train others, thus leading to our recognition as the health professions with these skills that can lend their expertise to others. We need to speak up and claim this opportunity to be seen as educators in health literacy, as the same journal article mentioned earlier states:

“We need to reach out and learn from other fields in our society that reach the public such as the adult education community, communications sectors, and marketing specialists.” (Gazmararian JA, Curran JW, Parker RM, Bernhardt JM, DeBuono BA. Public health literacy in America: an ethical imperative. Am J Prev Med. 2005 Apr;28(3):317–22).

Do you see librarians mentioned specifically? I don't, but I just can't imagine anyone doing this any better than we can, and I do hope you agree! We need to exert our presence, and as Linda Watson emphasized in her presidential priorities, “be recognized as the most visible, trusted, and respected health information professional” in this arena. She saw the value of health literacy and appointed an MLA task force. I will expand on her initiative to ensure that we have a key role in helping patients understand their health care.

N–Navigate: In aviation, pilots use maps and charts to guide their trips and preplan their courses. In visual flight mode, they use landmarks such as mountains, rivers, towns, roads, etc., to determine where they are in relation to what is outlined on an aeronautical chart. With instrument flying, they rely on special charts that map out designated routes between electronic navigational aids. A flight is then achieved by following these routes.

Like aviation, MLA has taken measures (although no gauges have been developed to date) to monitor and navigate the world in which we operate. The president and MLA Board of Directors establish annual goals and priorities in order to move forward and strategically go in the best direction for the profession. A lot of priorities take more than one year to complete, so in these cases, work will continue during my presidential year. For example:

  • The Vital Pathways Project Task Forces, started by MJ Tooey and Past-President Pat Thibodeau, are examining how to translate the contributions hospital librarians make to the health care enterprise. By mapping our existing state of hospital librarians and through learning more about the environments in which they work, MLA is strategically assisting hospital librarians to chart their futures and sustain their viability in an ever-evolving workplace. Getting hospital librarians included as a “force of magnetism” for health care facilities that want to be recognized as Magnet hospitals for recruiting nurses will ensure that libraries are recognized as supporting professional development opportunities for nurses.
  • As scholarly communication cycles change and publishing venues transform, we will continue to monitor the horizon and encourage our clients to seek new means of promoting and distributing their research with the goal of translating research into practice. MLA's Scholarly Communications Task Force, headed by Pat Thibodeau, will continue to encourage dialog with publishers, promote publishing alternatives to authors, and advocate for national information policies that advance research and health care. MLA will also support libraries serving as digital repositories for their institutions.
  • As the National Health Information Network becomes a reality, we need to be active players in helping to establish interoperability standards, ensure patient privacy, and endorse the inclusion of information resources to be consulted by both health care providers and consumers. As individual, patient-accessible health records are implemented, we can assure that links to quality health information are included in these records. MLA's MedSpeak series of brochures and other health information literacy tools can become important components of such electronic records. We can also make sure patients know where to go to get additional information by creating a link to libraries from within the records in much the same way Loansome Doc links unaffiliated individuals to serving libraries. Patients and consumers can be linked to librarians that offer consumer health information through inclusion of a referral URL or single toll-free phone number in the patient record that refers them to an agency that has a central repository of consumer resource center locations.
  • MLA members can also serve as partners with the AHIMA and AMIA “Got EHR?” initiative to help inform consumers of the value of personal health records and how to navigate the technology to use them. We can also provide the personal assistance to help patients understand the information contained within their records or with getting additional resources in order to learn more about their health.
  • The Information Specialist in Context Task Force action plan based on the wonderful consultant work of the faculty of the Eskind Biomedical Library, Vanderbilt University, calls for further adoption of this new role through implementing additional proof of concept models so that others can understand the value provided by this type of information professional. Other recommendations include publicizing current ISIC practitioners' settings, job responsibilities, and compensation as a means of further advancing this concept beyond the early concept adopters.

C–Communicate: Pilots, from the time they start moving away from their hangers, are in constant communication with air traffic controllers and other pilots via their radios. They confirm weather, indicate flight patterns, and may be required to get instructions to taxi and takeoff from trained and skilled personnel located in local control towers as well as in radar control centers. Pilots flying in instrument conditions, or IFR, are required to file a flight plan. Such plans indicate the number of passengers on board, planned routes that will be followed, anticipated flight times, etc. Each IFR pilot enters a “squawk number” into an instrument so that they can be tracked by radar. This is extremely helpful when flying in clouds where there is no visibility to see other planes. Radar controllers alert pilots of potential traffic, hopefully, well ahead of time.

Like pilots, all of our efforts as medical librarians are for naught if we don't communicate them to our health care colleagues and to the public. As pilots use radios to keep connected with traffic controllers and airport personnel, we need to remember to check-in and broadcast our achievements frequently.

As president, I will continue to use the skills of PCI, MLA's public relations firm, to spread the word about our profession's accomplishments, roles, and values. As our previous year's media focus was on health literacy, I would like to expand this in the coming year to concentrate on informing health care administrators and other health care professionals about our health literacy contributions: how we improve the public health through information. Publishing articles in administrative journals that highlight our return on investment on patient outcomes will reach those who only see bottom line. While hospital libraries still will serve health care providers, emphasizing our transforming roles as patient and consumer educators will serve to advocate for our profession and our role in this key public health initiative, as outlined in Healthy People 2010.

I will encourage MLA's members to engage in disseminating even more information about our health literacy role by attending other health care provider conferences and presenting our value as part of their meeting programming. We need to not only do, but also be sure we preach what we are doing, so we are recognized as the experts!

As we explore new models for our profession, we need to ensure that again, the word about these new roles is getting diffused. This will help us to recruit the best and brightest and those interested in making a difference! We will continue to emphasize hiring diverse and talented individuals into our field. We will explore MLA membership benefits that are attractive, that permit customization and tailoring to meet individual needs. MLANET is in the process of being revamped, and more work will continue, so this site serves as an effective portal for members. More recruitment efforts will be initiated with K-12 educators and counselors.

Partnerships will be a keystone in the coming year. We do not work in isolation and others are crossing our professional boundaries. For instance, I ran across this other organization's “Hot topics for 2006” recently. Our goals look a lot like these don't they (Table 1)? This is the National Nursing Staff Development Organization. We need to partner with such organizations to ensure that we are all working for the common good and that we are not overlooked as key players in the information world. We also need to work with our global partners and implement the recommendations of the MLA Global Initiatives Task Force. We need to be prepared to assist providers who respond to natural and manmade disasters. “Librarians without Borders” is becoming a reality with a task force at work under the leadership of Marcus Banks. We need to toot our own horn and actively sell ourselves as “the” needed health care team player of the future.

Table thumbnail
Table 1 2006 Hot Topics of the National Nursing Staff Development Organization

Summary

There are many new roles and challenges that await us as innovators of information discovery and delivery. We need to embrace these new opportunities and forge new partnerships that enable our professional expansion and recognition as the best providers of quality information for improved health. We need to diffuse the adoption of our many roles and ensure that we are equipped with the needed skills and knowledge to be successful in new practice arenas. The priorities I've outlined are published in the April 2006 issue of the MLA News. Please review them with care and let me know what you think about how I expect to guide MLA throughout the coming year. We are in control and can use our knowledge and skills to design our flight plans, reach our desired destinations, and communicate our value. We need to be ANC, not antsy, about our future!

In conclusion, we have a lot to be proud of as health care information professionals. Our skills are valuable not only to ourselves, but to other health care professionals and the general public. As others compete with us to provide information, we need to build on our basic foundations and promote them to those we serve. Let us reclaim our Foundations and Forge New Frontiers as we Fly from “F”oenix to “F”iladelphia to celebrate our Information Revolution, where “Change Is in the Air!”

I'd like to thank Susan Williams for her excellent artistic talents and PowerPoint finesse. Thank you, Susan! I'd also like to introduce the real pilot, Mark Shipman, my husband. Thank you for listening and again for this grand opportunity to be your pilot who will be “getting high” on MLA during this exciting upcoming year! [Holds up paper airplane.]

MLA board, NPC, and LAC committee members for 2007; rev your engines and LET'S FLY!

At the completion of her address, President Shipman invited Diana Cunningham, AHIP, co-chair of the 2007 National Program Committee, to give the official thank you for the 2006 annual meeting.

Cunningham: Whereas, the 2006 National Program Committee has planned an outstanding Medical Library Association program. Featured speakers such as Dr. Atul Gawande and our Janet Doe lecturer, Julie McGowan, have transformed us from A to Z with inspiring presentations. We will gain more transforming knowledge from tomorrow's distinguished panel on integrating reference information into the electronic health record.

Whereas, our president, MJ Tooey, inspired us all one year ago, throughout the year, and today, with her challenge that we figure out what a transformer does and what transforming means. Our exhibitors and partners have worked closely with us, as well.

Whereas, Phoenix itself represents the best of our culture and historic past and serves as a gateway to Arizona, which is blessed with some of the most beautiful natural wonders of the world, notably Sedona, the Grand Canyon, and the rushing white waters of the Colorado River.

Whereas, the 2006 Local Assistance Committee introduced all of us to the silver, turquoise, and Native American art, desert gardens, the Heard Museum, and so many other things, including creating the first-ever blog. We have enjoyed the local gastronomic dishes at outside patios in this warm, dry, therapeutic air, especially remarkable to those of us from the northeast where it continues to keep raining, just like Seattle, and Chicago reportedly hasn't been seen lately through the fog.

Whereas, the MLA headquarters' staff and professional meeting planners work with their usual knowledge and grace while multitasking to help all of us facilitate this 2006 annual meeting of the association.

Therefore, be it resolved that the membership of the Medical Library Association extends its profound appreciation and deep-felt thanks to the 2006 National Program Committee, the 2006 Local Assistance Committee, and the entire MLA headquarters' staff and professional meeting planners for their stellar efforts in planning this wonderful, wonderful annual meeting.

After applause, the membership adopted the motion by acclamation. Next Cunningham, on behalf of co-chair Susan Starr and other members of the 2007 National Program Committee, invited members to attend the 2007 meeting May 18–23, 2007, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. She stated that the 2007 National Program Committee enthusiastically accepted the challenge to make the next MLA annual meeting the very best ever and presented their theme, “Information Revolution: Change Is in the Air.”

Cunningham asked all of the members of the NPC for 2007 and LAC to stand and be recognized. Etheldra Templeton and Anne Seymour, the Philadelphia Local Assistance Committee cochairs, highlighted attractions in the host city and urged members to attend next year's meeting.

After President Shipman announced the winners of the MLA scholarship booth drawing, the second business session of the 106th annual meeting was officially adjourned.

SECTION PROGRAMMING

Contributed papers were presented in three sessions. This list is organized sequentially by day and then alphabetically by theme and lead MLA section. Abstracts are available at www.mlanet.org/am/am2006/pdf/2006abstracts.pdf.

Section Programming I: Sunday, May 21, 2006

Theme: Collections/Resources

2006 National Program Committee, Collection Development and Public Health/Health Administration Sections, and Outreach SIG: Gathering Health Data in E-Environments

Moderator: Elizabeth R. Lorbeer, associate director, Content Management, University of Alabama-Birmingham.

The National Library of Medicine's AllPlus Search: Tamas E. Doszkocs, Specialized Information Services, National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, MD.

Teaching Evidence-based Practice to Nurses in Rural Areas: Jenny L. Garcia, AHIP, Coe Library, University of Wyoming Libraries, and Karen N. Ouzts, Leadership Education to Advance Practice Special Program, School of Nursing, University of Wyoming–Laramie.

Public Health Practitioners Information Access and Use: Claire Twose and Kathleen Burr Oliver, William H. Welch Medical Library; Patricia Swartz, Division of Health Sciences Informatics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD; and Edward Bunker, College of Health Sciences, American University of Armenia, Yerevan, Armenia

Theme: Education and Outreach

Dental Section: The Future of Professional Health Care Education

Moderator: Michael R. Kronenfeld, AHIP, director, Learning Resource Center, AT Still University of the Health Sciences, Mesa Campus, Mesa, AZ.

The Future of Professional Health Care Education: Jack Dillenberg, Arizona School of Dentistry and Oral Health Mesa Campus, AT Still University of the Health Sciences, Mesa, AZ

The Future of Professional Health Care Education: Thomas McWilliams, associate dean, Bio-Clinical Sciences, and clinical professor, Emergency Medicine and Family Practice, Mesa Campus, AT Still University of the Health Sciences, Mesa, AZ

Educational Media and Technologies and Public Services Sections and Libraries in Curriculum SIG: Integrating Technology into the Health Sciences Curriculum

Moderator: Brenda Seago, AHIP, associate professor and director, Computer Based Instruction Lab, School of medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University-Richmond.

Evidence-based Medicine: Transforming Technology for Teaching at Two Campuses: John D. Jones Jr. and Tanya Feddern, AHIP, Louis Calder Memorial Library, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, and Susan K. Setterlund, Department of Biomedical Science, Florida Atlantic University–Boca Raton.

Transforming and Integrating 21st Century Educational Technologies: Librarians Respond to Faculty Needs: Jeanne M. Le Ber, Education Services, Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library, University of Utah–Salt Lake City.

Transforming Library Professional Development and Outreach Through Podcasting: Jane L. Blumenthal, AHIP, and Ivonne Martinez, Dahlgren Memorial Library, Georgetown University, Washington, DC; Theodora Bakker, AHIP, Gustave L. and Janet W. Levy Library, Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, NY; and Brian Boston, Center for New Designs in Learning and Scholarship, Georgetown University, Washington, DC.

Integrating Technology in a Renovated Library Curriculum: Rikke S. Ogawa, AHIP, and Brian W. Tobin, Lane Medical Library and Knowledge Management Center, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA.

Theme: Healers and Healing

History of the Health Sciences and Pharmacy and Drug Information Sections and Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgendered Health Sciences Librarians and Mental Health SIGs: Between “Madness” and Mental Health: Changing Perceptions and Treatment.

Moderator: Toni C. Yancey, National Networks of Libraries of Medicine Southeastern/Atlantic Region, University of Maryland-Baltimore.

Changing Measures of Madness: The Case of Winnie Ruth Judd: Sunny L. Worel, AHIP, New Product Development, Thomson West, St Paul, MN.

Societal Perceptions of Anorexia Nervosa: From the Saintly to the Scientific: Lee Vucovich, AHIP, Lister Hill Library of the Health Sciences, University of Alabama– Birmingham.

Implications for Librarianship Resulting from Deinstitutionalization: Bradley W. Bishop, Florida Mental Health Institute Research Library, Louis de la Parte Florida Mental Health Institute, Tampa, FL.

Schizophrenia: Emerging from the Darkness: Clista Clanton, Baugh Biomedical Library, University of South Alabama–Mobile.

The Retreat at York: Providing a Transformation to Humane Treatment of the Mentally Ill in the 19th Century: Joan M. Stoddart, AHIP, Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library, University of Utah–Salt Lake City.

Nursing and Allied Health Resources and Hospital Libraries Sections: Get Magnetized: Magnet Recognition, Libraries, and Excellence

Moderator: Richard Barry, AHIP, American Nurses Library, American Nurses Association, Silver Spring, MD.

History of Magnet Hospitals: Richard Barry, AHIP, American Nurses Library, American Nurses Association, Silver Spring, MD.

The Elements of Magnetism: Christina Joy, American Nurses Credentialing Center, Silver Spring, MD.

Magnet Recognition in the Real World: A Panel Discussion: Jan Baum, John C. Lincoln Health Network, Phoenix, AZ; Sally Harvey, AHIP, Learning Resources and Continuing Medical Education, Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center, Phoenix, AZ; David Howse, Information Services, Arizona Health Sciences Library, University of Arizona–Tucson; Dorice L. Vieira, Ehrman Medical Library, New York University School of Medicine–New York; and Pamela Sherwill, AHIP, College of Nursing, University of Florida–Gainesville.

Veterinary Medical Libraries Section: Transforming Veterinary Dentistry Through Education and Practice

Moderator: Jill Crawley-Low, Veterinary Medicine Library, University of Saskatchewan-Saskatoon, Canada.

Dentistry in Zoo Animals: Chris J. Visser, Aid Animal Dental Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ.

Theme: Leadership and Professional Development

Hospital Libraries, Corporate Information Services, Federal Libraries, Health Association Libraries, and Veterinary Medical Libraries Sections and Assessment and Benchmarking and Department of Veterans Affairs Librarians SIGs: Demonstrating Our Value: Benchmarking, Return on Investment, Cost Benefit Analyses

Moderator: Mary Fran Prottsman, AHIP, Library Program, Department of Veterans Affairs, Washington, DC.

If You Build It, Will They Come? Marketing Through Education: Mary F. Prottsman, AHIP, Library Program, Department of Veterans Affairs Central Office, Washington, DC, and Dianne Jones, Library Service, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Jackson,

Avoiding a Reduction of Force: Statistical Justification in a Hospital System: Cheryl M. Suttles, Medical and Community Health Library, Wann Langston Memorial Library, INTEGRIS Health, Oklahoma City, OK.

Using Lean Methodologies to Gain Efficiencies in High-volume Library Processes: Susan Schweinsberg Long, AHIP, Medical Library, Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, WA.

Code Yellow: Library 9–1–1: Carole M. Gilbert, AHIP, FMLA, and Alexia D. Estabrook, AHIP, Helen L. DeRoy Medical Library, Providence Hospital, Southfield, MI.

International Cooperation Section: Coordinated Programs or Peer-to-Peer: Which Is the Better Model for International Cooperation Between Libraries? A Debate

Moderator: Tony McSean, Elsevier, London, UK.

Coordinated Programs or Peer-to-peer: Which Is the Better Model for Cooperation Between Libraries? A Debate: Lenny Rhine, Health Science Center Libraries, University of Florida–Gainesville; Barbara Aronson, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland; and Laura Shane Godbolt, Modernisation Agency, National Health Service, UK.

Medical Library Education Section: Transformations in Progress: Voices of the Next Generation of Medical Librarianship

Moderator: James Andrews, School of Library and Information Science, University of South Florida-Tampa.

Creating Pathfinders to Help Chinese Health Consumers Find Quality Information on the Internet: Xuequn Pan, Library and Information Science, University of North Texas–Denton.

Publication Transformation: Why Authors Choose to Publish in Open Access, Free Full-text Journals: Stefanie E. Warlick, Health Sciences Library, University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill.

Provision of Consumer Health Information Services for Low-literate Patrons: Stephanie A. Williams, Library and Information Science, School of Information Studies, Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY.

Needs Analysis at a State Health Department Library: Citation Analysis of Official and Extramural Publications: Melissa L. Rethlefsen, Learning Resource Center, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN.

Theme: Research Methods

Research, Consumer and Patient Health Information, and Hospital Libraries Sections: Tools to Assist Underserved Librarians

Moderator: Susan J. Barnes, Health Sciences Library, University of Washington-Seattle.

Developing Retrieval Strategies for a Complex Subject Matter Blend: “Health Disparities”: Erin Braddock, West Texas Rural EXPORT Center; Margaret Vugrin, AHIP, Library; and James Speer, West Texas Rural EXPORT Center, Texas Tech Health Sciences Center–Lubbock.

Logic Models: A Tool for Planning and Evaluating Services: Elizabeth Kelly, Bernard Becker Medical Library, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, and Claire Hamasu, National Network of Libraries of Medicine MidContinental Region, Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library, University of Utah–Salt Lake City.

The Ten Thousand Questions Project: How Consumers Say What Consumers Want: Catherine Arnott Smith, School of Information Studies, Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY.

The Buck Starts Here: Using In-house Reports to Market Your Library: Elizabeth C. Burns, Medical Library, VA Medical Center, Kansas City, MO.

Section Programming II: Monday, May 22, 2006

Theme: Collections/Resources

Collection Development, Hospital Libraries, and Technical Services Sections: The Journey Ahead: Leaving Print for the Virtual Library

Moderator: Katherine Stemmer Frumento, AHIP, Library Services, Greenwich Hospital, Greenwich, CT.

Moving the Medical Library Directly to the Point of Patient Care: Outreach to Remote Users with an Intranet-based Virtual Medical Library: Elizabeth M. Killoran, AHIP, Medical Library, Milford Regional Medical Center, Milford, MA.

Taming the Wild Uniform Resource Locator: Technical and Workflow Solutions for Effective Access to Electronic Resources: Ben Hope and Betty Landesman, NIH Library, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD.

Zen and the Art of Electronic Resource Management: Transforming Technical Services: Daniel M. Dollar, John Gallagher, Cynthia Crooker, and Janis Glover, AHIP, Cushing/Whitney Medical Library, Yale University, New Haven, CT.

Dental Section, Medical Informatics and Public Health/Health Administration Sections: Stuck on E: Patron Expectation of E-Everything Changes What We Do

Moderator: Kathleen McGraw, Health Sciences Library, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill.

Medical Library Reference a Virtual Reality: Transforming Reference from Up-close and Personal to Seamless at the Point-of-Care: Rosalind K. Lett, AHIP, Knowledge Cartel, Lithonia, GA.

Understanding User Needs in an Online Environment: What We Can Learn from Electronic Reference Questions: Renae Barger and Melissa Ratajeski, Health Sciences Library System, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA.

Electronic Only, Please: Dealing with Increased User Demand for Electronic-only Resources: Vani K. Murthy, Montgomery College Libraries, Montgomery College, Rockville, MD, and Janette Shaffer, AHIP, Tracie E. Frederick, and Jane L. Blumenthal, AHIP, Dahlgren Memorial Library, Georgetown University, Washington, DC.

With All the “E” They Still Want the “P”: Integrating the Right Balance of Information Resources to Support Medical Students Throughout Queensland: Lisa M. Kruesi and Heather Todd, University of Queensland Library; Andrew Heath, Herston Medical Library; and Peter Baker, Rural Clinical Division, School of Medicine; University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.

Poster: Blog This! A Proactive Method to Increase Library Outreach: Lisa Huang, Learning Resource Center, Collin County Community College District, McKinney, TX.

Public Health/Health Administration, Research, Health Association Libraries, and Federal Libraries Sections: Evidence-based Public Health Librarianship

Moderator: Catherine Pepper, Gibson D. Lewis Library, University of North Texas Health Science Center-Fort Worth.

Improving Access to Public Health Information: A Study of Information Needs in a State Health Department: E. Hatheway Simpson, Nancy R. LaPelle, and Elaine Russo Martin, Lamar Soutter Library, University of Massachusetts Medical School–Worcester.

Evidence-based Public Health Informatics Training for Public Health Practitioners in New Mexico: A Randomized Controlled Trial: Jonathan D. Eldredge, AHIP, and Richard D. Carr, AHIP, Health Sciences Library and Informatics Center, The University of New Mexico–Albuquerque.

A Model of Informationist Service for Research Administrators at the National Institutes of Health: Janet Heekin, AHIP, NIH Library, National Institutes of Health Library, Bethesda, MD.

An Innovative Resource to Promote Evidence-based Public Health Decision Making: Maureen Dobbins, Kara DeCorby, Donna Ciliska and Helen Thomas, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada.

Theme: Education and Outreach

Nursing and Allied Health Resources, Hospital Libraries, and Chiropractic Libraries Sections and African American Medical Librarians Alliance SIG: Implementing Evidence-based Practice in the Real World

Moderator: Sheila Hofstetter, AHIP, Noble Science and Engineering Library, Arizona State University-Tempe.

Building a Culture of Best Practice Requires Collaboration Among Librarians, Scientists, and Clinicians: Ellen Fineout-Overholt, Arizona State University–Tempe.

It Takes Two: Librarians and Nurses Collaborate to Establish a Magnet Hospital Evidence-based Nursing Project: DeDe Leshy and Irene Lovas, Medical Library, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA.

The Hospital Library as “Magnet Force” for a Research and Evidence-based Nursing Culture: A Case Study of Two Magnet Hospitals in One Health System: Diane R. Rourke, AHIP, Library Services, Baptist Health South Florida, Miami, FL.

Strategies for Creating an Evidence-based Practice Nursing Culture: Tanya Feddern, AHIP, Louis Calder Memorial Library, University of Miami, Miami, FL, and Kathryn M. Ewers, Department of Education and Development, Jackson Health Systems, Miami, FL.

Public Services Section, Outreach and Molecular Biology and Genomics SIGs: Transforming Reference and Outreach Services for Biomedical Researchers

Moderator: Roberta Bronson Fitzpatrick, George F. Smith Library of the Health Sciences, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey-Newark.

Transforming Hands-on Instruction in Bioinformatics and Genomics: Pamela M. Corley, AHIP, Norris Medical Library, University of Southern California–Los Angeles.

Asymmetries in Retrieval of Gene Function Information: Timothy B. Patrick, College of Health Sciences, University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee, and Lillian C. Folk, College of Veterinary Medicine, and Catherine K. Craven, Health Management and Informatics, University of Missouri–Columbia.

From Desk to Text: The Transformation of Reference: Lynette Y. Ralph, AHIP, and Ladonna Guillot, Sims Memorial Library, Southeastern Louisiana University–Baton Rouge.

Leaving the Labyrinth: Partners in the Publication Process: Holly K. Grossetta Nardini, and Denise P. Hersey, Cushing/Whitney Medical Library; Carrie L. Iwema, Department of Neurosurgery; and Lynn H. Sette, Cushing/Whitney Medical Library; Yale University, New Haven, CT.

Theme: Healers and Healing

Cancer Librarians Section and Complementary and Alternative Medicine SIG: Cancer Prevention and Treatment: From Community Transformations to Complementary and Alternative Therapies

Moderator: Margaret Vugrin, AHIP, Health Sciences Library, Texas Tech University–Lubbock.

Community Health Attitude Transformation Through Colon Cancer Prevention and Awareness Campaign: Davor Vugrin, Center for Cancer Control, Texas Tech University–Lubbock.

Incorporating Complementary Therapies into the Hospital Oncology Setting: Challenges and Structure: Edythe Garvey, Banner Desert Medical Center, Chandler, AZ.

History of the Health Sciences Section and Oral History Committee, MLA Board, and MLA Headquarters: Passing the Baton: Transforming Knowledge

Moderator: Dee Jones, AHIP, Medical Library, Louisiana State University–Shreveport.

The Sherrington School: Lucretia W. McClure, AHIP, FMLA, Countway Library of Medicine, Boston, MA.

From Pap to ThinPrep to HPV Vaccine: Detection and Eradication of Cervical Cancer: Helen-Ann Brown, AHIP, Weill Cornell Medical Library, Cornell University, New York, NY.

A Leslie Morton Style Review of Selected Landmarks in Medical Bibliography from Alexandria to the Internet: Jeremy Norman, historyofscience.com, Novato, CA.

Genetics: From Genes to Genomes: Pamela M. Corley, AHIP, Norris Medical Library, University of Southern California–Los Angeles.

Theme: Leadership and Professional Development

Corporate Information Services and New Members Sections and African American Medical Librarians Alliance SIGs: The Job Market: How to Find the Jobs? What Do Hiring Managers Want?

Moderator: Shannon Jones, Tomkins-McCaw Library for the Health Sciences, Virginia Commonwealth University-Richmond.

An Employer's Perspective: Holly S. Buchanan, AHIP, Health Sciences Library and Informatics Center, The University of New Mexico–Albuquerque.

A Recruiter's Perspective: Deborah Schwarz, Library Associates, Beverly Hills, CA.

Marching in Tempo to a Syncopated Rhythm: An Independent Information Profession's Perspective on the Job Market: Rosalind K. Lett, AHIP, Knowledge Cartel, Lithonia, GA.

Panel Discussion: Shannon D. Jones, Tomkins-McCaw Library for the Health Sciences, Virginia Commonwealth University–Richmond; Rosalind Lett, AHIP, The Knowledge Cartel, Lithonia, GA; Holly S. Buchanan, AHIP, Health Sciences Center, University of New Mexico–Albuquerque; and Deborah Schwartz, Library Associates, Beverly Hills, CA.

Leadership and Management and Hospital Libraries Sections: Information Darwinianism

Moderator: Laurie L. Thompson, AHIP, Libraries, University of Texas Southwestern Center-Dallas.

Information Darwinianism: Adaptation and Renewal for Your Library in the 21st Century: Lou Wetherbee, Lou Wetherbee and Associates, Dallas, TX, and Richard Wayne, Strategic Information Management Services, DeSoto, TX.

Medical Library Education and Medical Informatics Sections: How We Educate Ourselves: A Refresher on Education Options

Moderator: Cynthia Vaughn, AHIP, Preston Medical Library, University of Tennessee Graduate School of Medicine-Knoxville.

Panel Discussion: Christopher Stave, Lane Medical Library and Knowledge Management Center, Stanford University, Stanford, CA; Steven L. MacCall, School Library and Information Studies, University of Alabama–Tuscaloosa; Ana D. Cleveland, AHIP, Health Informatics Program Director, Houston Program, Department of Family Medicine Health Sciences Center, University of North Texas–Denton; and Prudence W. Dalrymple, AHIP, Health Sciences Informatics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD.

Section Program III: Tuesday, May 23, 2006

Theme: Collections/Resources

History of the Health Sciences and Hospital Libraries Sections: Junk into History? Dealing with Archives and Gifts

Moderator: Jane E. Borland, AHIP, Medical Library, Mary Washington University, Fredricksburg, VA.

Tips for Managing Archival Collections in the Health Sciences, or What to Do When You Can't Do It All: Lisa A. Mix, Kalmanovitz Library and Center for Knowledge Management, University of California–San Francisco.

Enhancing Value and Visibility: The Hospital Library as Manager of Corporate History: Fay Towell, Health Sciences Library, Greenville Hospital System, Greenville, SC.

Opening Pandora's Box: Redux: Richard C. Wood and Margaret Vugrin, AHIP, Preston Smith Library of the Health Sciences, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center–Lubbock.

Gloom Impenetrable: The Letters of William J. Armstrong: Richard Nollan, Health Sciences Library, University of Tennessee–Memphis.

Posters

Transforming 50 Cubic Feet of Papers, 4,000 Slides, and 250 Videotapes into an Archive Celebrating the Life and Work of John C. McDonald: Dee Jones, AHIP and Marianne Comegys, Medical Library, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center–Shreveport.

Managing and Disseminating Historical Content via an Archival Knowledge Management Database Application: Christopher Ryland, Mary Teloh, Jeremy Nordmoe, and Qinghua Kou, Eskind Biomedical Library, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN.

Walking and Talking through History: Putting to Use the Archived Materials of a Specialty Nursing Association: Mark Vrabel, AHIP, and Christine Maloney, Library, Oncology Nursing Society, Pittsburgh, PA.

Technical Services and Educational Media and Technologies Sections: Transforming Scholarly Publishing: The Role of Institutional Repositories

Moderator: Junie C. Janzen, Schusterman Center, Oklahoma University-Tulsa.

Lessons Learned: Institutional Repositories at an Academic Health Sciences Library: Sandy Tao and Edward Roberts, Health Sciences Library, University of Washington–Seattle.

An Overview of Institutional Repositories: Issues and Questions for Medical Libraries: Thomas Singarella and Lois Bellamy, Health Sciences Library and Biocommunications Center, University of Tennessee Health Science Center–Memphis.

Institutional Repositories: What if You Determined Needs Before Building it?: Janis F. Brown, AHIP, Norris Medical Library; Deborah A. Holmes-Wong, Digital Information Management; and Sara R. Tompson, Science and Engineering Library; University of Southern California–Los Angeles.

A Medical Library Spearheads a Campus-wide Institutional Repository Initiative: Valeri Craigle, Mary Youngkin, Joan M. Gregory and Shona R. Dippie, Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library, University of Utah–Salt Lake City.

Poster: The Bioethics Digital Library: Best Practices Evolving from Ground Zero: Amy J. Hatfield, Ruth Lilly Medical Library; and Gabriele Hysong, Chao Huang and Shana Kelley, School of Library and Information Science; Indiana University–Indianapolis.

Theme: Education and Outreach

Educational Media and Technologies and Medical Library Education Sections: Virtual Classroom: Demonstrating the Use of Distance Learning Technologies

Moderator: Brenda Seago, AHIP, Computer Based Instruction Lab, School of Medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University-Richmond.

Evidence-based Medicine for the Remote Student: A Demonstration of the Classroom Across Distances: Janette Shaffer, AHIP, Dahlgren Memorial Library; Steven M. Schwartz, Department of Family Medicine; and Tracie Frederick and Jane L. Blumenthal, AHIP, Dahlgren Memorial Library; Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, DC.

Are Medical Students Happier Online? Teaching and Learning PubMed Skills without Entering a Classroom: Laura M. Schimming, Gustave L. and Janet W. Levy Library, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY.

Breezing Through Online Instruction: Two Case Studies: Katherine T. L. Vaughan, Health Sciences Library, University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill.

Theme: Healers and Healing

Consumer and Patient Health Information and Chiropractic Libraries Sections and African American Medical Librarians Alliance SIG: Promoting Patient Safety

Moderator: Lorri Zipperer, Zipperer Project Management, Evanston, IL.

Clinical Pathways for Hospitalists at Bellevue Hospital Center: Tania P. Bardyn, AHIP, Affiliated Libraries, and Dorice L. Vieira, Ehrman Medical Library, New York University School of Medicine–New York, and Douglas B. Bails and Michael C. Brabeck, School of Medicine, Bellevue Hospital Center, New York, NY.

Personal Digital Assistants: A Prospective Tool for Enhancing Patient Safety: Joanne V. McHugh-Romano, HAM-TMC Library, Houston Academy of Medicine-Texas Medical Center Library, Houston, TX.

Integrating Library Expertise in the Development of a Patient Tool to Foster Informed Decision Making and Participatory Health Care: Julie Beauregard, Eskind Biomedical Library; Jim Jirjis, Adult Primary Care Center; and Taneya Koonce, Shannon Potter and Nunzia B. Giuse, AHIP, FMLA, Eskind Biomedical Library; Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN.

An Evidence-based Approach to Development of a Patient-centered Website: Douglas L. Varner, AHIP, Kathleen Burr Oliver, Communication and Liaison Services; and Nancy K. Roderer, AHIP, William H. Welch Medical Library, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD.

Federal Libraries Section and Outreach and African American Medical Librarians Alliance SIGs: Arizona to Zimbabwe, Afghanistan to Vermont

Moderator: Rebecca K. Satterthwaite, CDC Information Center, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA.

Blogging to Empower: Siobhan Champ-Blackwell, National Network of Libraries of Medicine MidContinental Region, Health Sciences Library, Creighton University, Omaha, NE, and Elizabeth Kelly, National Network of Libraries of Medicine MidContinental Region, Bernard Becker Medical Library, Washington University, St. Louis, MO.

Development of a National Library of Medicine Training Program for Pan American Health Organization Librarians: Lidia Hutcherson and Stacey J. Arnesen, National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, MD.

Information Needs of Overseas Federal Facility (OFF) Staff and Partners: Robert Swain, Division of Health Sciences Informatics; Kathleen Oliver, Welch Medical Library; Harold Lehmann, Division of Health Sciences Informatics, and Nancy Roderer, Welch Medical Library; Johns Hopkins, Baltimore, MD; and Jocelyn Rankin, AHIP, FMLA, CDC Information Center, and Teresa Hammett, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA.

Country of Origin Library Experiences of International Medical Faculty, Researchers, and Students: Implications for Medical Libraries in the United States: Arpita Bose, Norris Medical Library, University of Southern California–Los Angeles.

Pharmacy and Drug Information Section: EMBASE.com Lecture: Exploring the Boundaries Between Indigenous Healing and Contemporary Biomedicine

Moderator: Sarah McCord, Health Sciences Library, Washington State University-Pullman.

EMBASE.com Lecture: Exploring the Boundaries Between Indigenous Healing and Contemporary Biomedicine: Lewis Mehl-Madrona, Family Medicine, College of Medicine, Royal University Hospital, University of Saskatchewan–Saskatoon, Canada.

Theme: Leadership and Professional Development

Leadership and Management Section, Corporate Information Services, Health Association Libraries, and Technical Services Sections and Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgendered Health Sciences Librarians SIG: Managing Change

Moderator: Teresa Knott, AHIP, Health Sciences and Human Services Library, University of Maryland-Baltimore.

Transformational Skills in a Perpetually Changing Information Landscape: Brian Bunnett, AHIP, and Jon Crossno, AHIP, Library, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center–Dallas, and Regina Lee, Information Resources, Mary Kay, Dallas, TX.

The Library's Role in Transforming the Curriculum of the School of Medicine: Lisa K. Traditi, AHIP, Denison Memorial Library, University of Colorado and Health Sciences Center–Denver.

Reaching New Levels: Jane Fama and Elaine Russo Martin, Lamar Soutter Library, University of Massachusetts Medical School–Worcester.

Incorporating Knowledge Management in an Academic Health Sciences Library to Meet Evolving Customer Needs: Pamela Bradigan and Ruey L. Rodman, Prior Health Sciences Library, The Ohio State University–Columbus.

Posters

The Changing Face of Work: Flextime and Flexplace: Valerie St. Pierre Gordon, AHIP, and Susan C. Corbett, AHIP, Lister Hill Library of the Health Sciences, University of Alabama–Birmingham.

Our Challenge for the Future: Library Reorganization: Beverly Gresehover, Alexa Mayo, AHIP, and MJ Tooey, AHIP, Health Sciences and Human Services Library, University of Maryland–Baltimore.

Outcomes and Measurable Indicators Drive the Logic Model Approach for a Liaison Program: Neville D. Prendergast and Elizabeth Kelly, Bernard Becker Medical Library, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO.

Full Coverage: An Expanded Role For Medical Librarians as Part of a Health Care Team to Address Issues of Health Literacy: Elizabeth K. Hill, AHIP, University of Idaho Library, University of Idaho–Moscow.

Relevant Issues Section and Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgendered Health Sciences Librarians SIG: Transformation Begins with a Single Step …

Moderator: Ellen Detlefsen, Department of Library and Information Science, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA.

Refugee Health Information Network and the Role of the Medical Librarian: Gale A. Dutcher and Stacey J. Arnesen, National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, MD, and John C. Scott, Center for Public Service Communications, Arlington, VA.

Information Services in the Chaos of Disaster: Louisiana Medical Reference in the Wake of Hurricane Katrina: Michelynn McKnight, AHIP, School of Library and Information Science, Louisiana State University–Baton Rouge.

Web (Non)Sense: Is Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgendered Health Information Missing in Action from the Internet at Your Local Hospital?: Mary Jo Dorsey, AHIP, Richard M. Johnston Health Sciences Library, The Western Pennsylvania Hospital–Pittsburgh.

Transformations Post Katrina: Lions and Tigers Share a Den: Lynette Y. Ralph, AHIP, Sims Memorial Library, Southeastern Louisiana University–Hammond; Ladonna C. Guillot, Sims Memorial Library, Southeastern Louisiana University–Baton Rouge; Marlene Bishop, Carolyn Bridgewater, AHIP, Kathryn Kerdolff, AHIP, and Maureen Knapp, Health Sciences Center Library; Julie Schiavo, AHIP, and Elizabeth Strother, AHIP, School of Dentistry Library; and Wilba Swearingen, AHIP, Health Sciences Center Library, Louisiana State University–New Orleans.

Theme: Research Methods

Medical Informatics Section and Molecular Biology and Genomics SIG: Biomedical Ontologies and Taxonomies

Moderator: Susan Kendall, AHIP, Libraries, Michigan State University-East Lansing.

Ontologies, Taxonomies, Classifications, Thesauri, and Terminologies: Understanding the Differences: Stuart Nelson, National Institutes of Health, Washington, DC.

Ontologies in Bioinformatics and Molecular Biology: Joyce Mitchell, Department of Medical Informatics, University of Utah–Salt Lake City.

Research Section, Hospital Libraries, and Nursing and Allied Health Resources Sections and Outreach and African American Medical Librarians Alliance SIGs: Research 101 Toolbox

Moderator: Martha R. Harris, AHIP, College Station, TX.

Finding Our Foundation: Analysis of the Library and Information Science Abstracts Database for Research Article Retrievability: Carol Perryman, Triangle Research Libraries Network and Dihui Lu, School of Information and Library Science, University of North Carolina– Chapel Hill.

Achieving Results Through Complex Collaboration: A Case Study of a Needs Assessment of Health Care Professionals Serving Native American Communities: Lilian Hoffecker, AHIP, Denison Memorial Library, University of Colorado and Health Sciences Center–Denver, CO; Patricia Bradley, Health Sciences Library and Informatics Center, University of New Mexico–Albuquerque; John Bramble, Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library, University of Utah Health Sciences Center–Salt Lake City; Stephanie Weldon, AHIP, Denison Memorial Library, University of Colorado and Health Sciences Center–Denver; and Patricia Auflick, Arizona Health Sciences Library, University of Arizona–Tucson.

Mediated Literature Review for Cases Presented at Morning Report Decreases Hospital Charges and Length of Stay: Donna F. Timm, LSU Health Sciences Library, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center–Shreveport.

Systematic Reviews and Meta-analysis in Health Sciences Information Research: An Appraisal and a Tutorial: Kalyani Ankem, School of Library and Information Sciences, North Carolina Central University–Durham.

POSTER PRESENTATIONS

Posters were presented in two sessions, with creators of odd numbered posters available on Sunday afternoon and creators of even numbered posters available on Monday. Due to withdrawn and renumbered posters, some numbers are not used. Poster abstracts are available at http://www.mlanet.org/am/am2006/pdf/2006abstracts.pdf.

Sunday, May 21, 2006 (Odd Numbers)

1) Expanding Our Reach: The Impact of Open Access on the Journal of the Medical Library Association: T. Scott Plutchak, AHIP, Lister Hill Library of the Health Sciences, University of Alabama–Birmingham.

3) From Interlibrary Loan to Resource Sharing: Managing Change: Kevin M. O'Brien, Library of the Health Sciences, University of Illinois–Chicago.

5) The Collaborative Curriculum: How the Development of a Virtual Education Library Transformed the Pedagogical Approach of a Medical Society: Nancy Lombardo and Valeri Craigle, Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library, University of Utah–Salt Lake City.

7) Library Toolkit: Pathophysiology–Dentistry: Nighat Ispahany, Kathren Torraca, Marina Chilov, Tracy Allen, Konstantina Matsoukas and Elaine Zimbler, Augustus C. Long Health Sciences Library, Columbia University, New York, NY.

9) XML in Action: Collaborating with a Third Party Book Review Service: Steven Hunt and Michelle Frisque, Galter Health Sciences Library, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, and Rik Tamm-Daniels, Doody Enterprises, Chicago, IL.

11) EthnoMed: Transformation of a Clinical Information Resource: Edward Roberts, Sandy Tao and Ellen Howard, Health Sciences Libraries/K. K. Sherwood Library, Harborview Medical Center; University of Washington–Seattle.

13) Streamlining the Handling of CD-ROMs in Compliance with Licenses: Xiaoli Li and Carolyn Kopper, Carlson Health Sciences Library, University of California– Davis.

15) To Honor, Develop, and Promote: An Academic Library Carries on the School of Medicine's Mission of Cura Personalis: Ivonne Martinez and Jane Blumenthal, AHIP, Dahlgren Memorial Library, Georgetown University, Washington, DC.

17) The Bioethics Digital Library: Best Practices Evolving from Ground Zero: Amy J. Hatfield, Ruth Lilly Medical Library; and Gabriele Hysong, Chao Huang and Shana Kelley, School of Library and Information Science; Indiana University–Indianapolis.

19) From LoST to FindIt!: One Library's Journey to a Federated Search Tool: Anne Seymour and Frank Campbell, Biomedical Library; Laurie Allen, Van Pelt Library; Delphine Khanna, Information Technology and Digital Development; William Kopycki, Van Pelt Library, and Rachelle Nelson; Jean Newland, Jeanne Shuttleworth, Van Pelt Library; and Leslie Vallhonrat, Information Technology and Digital Development; University of Pennsylvania–Philadelphia.

21) Increasing the Availability of Electronic Resources to Health Sciences Libraries: Barbara B. Jones, J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library, University of Missouri–Columbia.

23) Transformations Along the Journey: Consumer Health Online and MedlinePlus “Go Local”: Lee A. Vucovich, AHIP, Lister Hill Library of the Health Sciences, University of Alabama–Birmingham; Steven MacCall, School of Library and Information Studies, University of Alabama–Tuscaloosa; and Catherine Hogan Smith, AHIP, Lister Hill Library of the Health Sciences, University of Alabama–Birmingham.

25) The Pilot's Smooth Landing: Subject Guides “On-the-Fly”: Hattie H. Vines, AHIP, and Sally Wardell, Medical Center Library, Duke University, Durham, NC.

27) Creating an Online New Books List: Complexities of Sorting, Foreign Character Display, and Online Public Access Catalog (OPAC) Linking: Chris Ewing and Janis Brown, AHIP, Norris Medical Library, University of Southern California–Los Angeles.

29) Core Books and Journals in Veterinary Medicine: Print to Hypertext Markup Language (HTML): Jill Crawley-Low, Veterinary Medicine Library, University of Saskatchewan–Saskatoon, Canada.

31) Evidence of a Transformation? Examining the Reference Collection: Ana G. Ugaz and Taryn Resnick, Medical Sciences Library, Texas A&M University–College Station.

33) Library Research Skills and the Nursing Curriculum: Engaging Students in the Post-Brandon/Hill Era: Carol L. Watwood, AHIP, Helm-Cravens Library, Western Kentucky University–Bowling Green.

35) Changing Perspectives: Strategies to Generate Library Entry Points into Medical Education: Erika L. Sevetson, Christopher Hooper-Lane, Allan Barclay, AHIP, and Andrew Boies, Ebling Library, University of Wisconsin–Madison.

37) Enhancing Electronic Learning Through the Use of Training Videos: Mark Berendsen and Stephanie C. Kerns, Galter Health Sciences Library, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL.

39) Transforming Lives: How a Book Group Connects Patients and Staff: Amy Louise Frey, AHIP, Health Sciences Library, and Mary Jo Archambault, Therapeutic Recreation, Hospital for Special Care, New Britain, CT.

41) Improving Access to Health Information in the United States-Mexico Borderlands: A Bilingual Guide for Promotoras: Norice Lee, Sylvia P. Ortiz and Cindy Watkins, New Mexico State University–Las Cruces.

43) Talk Radio: Advocating and Celebrating Health Information Resources Over the Airwaves: Rozalynd P. McConnaughy, Ruth A. Riley, Laura Kane, AHIP, and Allison LoCicero, School of Medicine Library, University of South Carolina–Columbia.

45) Podcasting with Purpose: Transforming a New Technology into a Useful Service for Library Patrons: Bart Ragon, Claude Moore Health Sciences Library, University of Virginia–Charlottesville.

47) Designing the Phoenix: The Rebirth of a Course Registration Process into a Curriculum Management System: Patricia Greenberg and Bart Ragon, Claude Moore Health Sciences Library, University of Virginia–Charlottesville.

49) The National Library of Medicine's Hispanic Outreach Portfolio: A Descriptive Overview: Frederick B. Wood, Elliot R. Siegel, Gale Dutcher and Angela Ruffin, National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, MD.

51) The Library: A Place to Find a Treasure of Health Information: Logan Ludwig, AHIP, Mary J. Klatt, Eric Nygren, and Stephen VanHouten, Health Sciences Library, Loyola University, Maywood, IL.

53) Health and Medicine in the News: Linking Users to Health Information Reported in the Star Tribune (Minneapolis, MN): Lisa McGuire and Nicole Theis-Mahon, Bio-Medical Library, University of Minnesota–Minneapolis.

55) Partnerships to Integrate Evidence-based Practice and Research Skills across the Health Curriculum: Martha J. Portree, Tina Adams, and Kevin Ketchner, Cline Library, Northern Arizona University–Flagstaff.

57) Prescription for the Spirit: A Library and Pastoral Services Partnership: Heidi Marleau, AHIP, and Stephen Johnson, Ebling Library, University of Wisconsin– Madison, and Penny Andrews, Pastoral Services Department, University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics–Madison.

59) Stay Informed: Really Simple Syndication (RSS) Made Easy: Gang (Wendy) Wu, Shiffman Medical Library, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI, and Jie Li, AHIP, Biomedical Library, University of South Alabama–Mobile.

61) Transformation of Library Orientation for First-year Medical Students: Helvi McCall Price, AHIP, and Ada Seltzer, AHIP, Rowland Medical Library, University of Mississippi Medical Center–Jackson.

63) How Can Online Learning Object Databases Help Me?: Cynthia L. Sheffield, Welch Medical Library, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD.

65) Grantwriting and Career Development Skills for New Research Faculty in the Health Sciences: Bonnie McTaggart, Health Sciences Library, School of Medicine, University of Washington–Seattle.

67) Developing Evidence-based Practice Instruction in a Clinical Setting: The Library Perspective: Sue H. Felber, AHIP, Biomedical Library; Terry L. Sylvanus, 3 South, MCC; Sheila Ferrall, Nursing Administration; Joan I. Miller, Biomedical Library; H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL.

69) Starting and Implementing a Bioinformatics Program at Washington University School of Medicine Bernard Becker Medical Library: Transforming Reference Services: Lili Wang, Kim Lipsey, and Carol Murray; Bernard Becker Medical Library, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO.

71) Changing Roles: Library Takes Prominent Role in Health Sciences Center's Center of Excellence in Women's Health: Nancy T. Lombardo, and Sally Patrick, Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library, and Kathleen B. Digre, School of Medicine, University of Utah–Salt Lake City.

73) Extending Customer Service and Instruction Through Podcasts: Andrea Y. Griffith, and Elisa Cortez, University Libraries, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, CA.

75) Authors and Zealots: Transforming Scholarly Communication: Mary E. Youngkin, Valeri Craigle, and Joan Marcotte Gregory, AHIP; Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library, University of Utah–Salt Lake City.

79) Transforming Patient-Clinician Communication Through Information: Evaluating the Impact of Mediated Searches for Patients and Families: Ruth Volk and Karen Hammelef, Patient Support Services and Patient Education, Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Michigan–Ann Arbor.

81) Information Rxs: Real and Perceived Barriers to Fulfillment: Monica Leisey and Jean P. Shipman, AHIP, VCU Libraries, Tompkins-McCaw Library for the Health Sciences, Virginia Commonwealth University– Richmond.

83) All About Patient Safety: What the Library Can Do: Kelly Near and Gretchen Arnold, AHIP, Claude Moore Health Sciences Library, University of Virginia–Charlottesville.

85) Consumer Health Information Patient Bedside Rounds: New Roles for Librarians: Patricia A. Hammond, AHIP; Catharine S. Canevari; and Jean P. Shipman, AHIP, VCU Libraries, Virginia Commonwealth University–Richmond.

87) Full Coverage: An Expanded Role For Medical Librarians as Part of a Health Care Team to Address Issues of Health Literacy: Elizabeth K. Hill, AHIP, University of Idaho Library, University of Idaho–Moscow.

89) Promoting Patient Safety at the Bedside: Training Nurses on Patient Education Resources: Cynthia J. Vaughn, AHIP; Martha Earl, AHIP; and Elaine Brekke, AHIP; Preston Medical Library, Preston Medical Library; Virginia Turner, UT Medical Center, and Beth Weitz, UT Medical Center; and Sandy Oelschlegel, Preston Medical Library; University of Tennessee– Knoxville.

91) Providing Point of Care Information to the Busy Clinician: Transformation from Library Website to Clinical Portal: Robert Cupryk; Kerry A. O'Rourke, AHIP, Robert Wood Johnson Library of the Health Sciences, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey–New Brunswick, and Judith Cohn, University Libraries, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey– Newark.

93) Teach on Peach: A Library-Clinician Patient Education Collaboration: Jennifer Diehl; Christine Frank, AHIP; and Toby Gibson, Library of Rush University Medical Center, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL.

95) Transforming Nursing Practice for Today's World: Teaching Information Literacy Skills to Nurses as a Preparation for Evidence-based Nursing Practice: Richard A. Billingsley, coordinator, Information and Instructional Services, Himmelfarb Health Sciences Library, The George Washington University, Washington, DC.

97) Computer Instruction for Health Care Providers: Transforming the Educator into the Learner: Russell Smith, Norris Medical Library, University of Southern California–Los Angeles.

99) Identifying the Health Information Needs of Health Care Practitioners Serving Native American Communities in the Four Corners Region: Patricia Bradley, Health Sciences Library and Informatics Center, and Mary Jiron Belgarde, Language Literacy, Sociocultural Studies, and Educational Administration, University of New Mexico–Albuquerque; Lilian Hoffecker, AHIP, Denison Memorial Library, University of Colorado and Health Sciences Center–Denver; John Bramble, Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library, University of Utah–Salt Lake City; Stephanie Weldon, AHIP, Denison Memorial Library, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center–Denver; and Patricia Auflick, Arizona Health Sciences Library, University of Arizona–Tucson.

101) Community Service: A Dental Library's Initiative: Marie-Lise Antoun Shams, AHIP, Dental Library, University of Detroit Mercy–Detroit.

103) Health Sciences Library Students Promoting Multicultural Health Literacy: Elizabeth Eisenhauer, Uniform Data System for Medical Rehabilitation, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY; Anne Callas, Harrison Medical Library, Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, Baltimore, MD; Patricia Engel, Department of Surgery, University at Buffalo, Buffalo General Hospital, Buffalo, NY; Sara Zwirlein, Buffalo and Erie County Public Libraries, Buffalo, NY; Mary Kennedy, Patient Education, Buffalo General Hospital, Kaleida Health System, Buffalo, NY; and Diane Schwartz, AHIP, FMLA, Libraries and Archives, Kaleida Health, Buffalo, NY.

105) Transforming Diabetes Self-management: Catherine M. Boss, AHIP, Booker Health Sciences Library, Jersey Shore University Medical Center, Neptune, NJ; Joanne Papanicolau, John B. Movelle MD Medical Library, Riverview Medical Center, Red Bank, NJ; and Susan Pistolakis, Information Resource Center, Ocean Medical Center, Brick, NJ.

107) Librarians and Clinicians as Coauthors: A True Success Story: Jill B. Mayer, AHIP, Health Sciences Library, University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill.

109) From the Ground Up: Developing a Resource Center for Maternal Health and HIV/AIDS in Ethiopia: Alicia A. Livinski, School of Information and Library Science, University of South Florida–Tampa.

111) Schizophrenia: Emerging from the Darkness: Clista Clanton, Baugh Biomedical Library, University of South Alabama–Mobile.

113) Genetics: From Genes to Genomes: Pamela M. Corley, AHIP, Norris Medical Library, University of Southern California–Los Angeles.

115) Making Every Step Count: Outreach and Collaborative Programming for Child Health in a Community Health Library: Christine W. Allen, AHIP, Community Health Library; Barbara Platts, AHIP; and Susan Wischman, Community Health Library, Munson Medical Center, Traverse City, MI.

117) Pathways to Patient Education in the Electronic Medical Record: Lora Robbins, AHIP, Health Sciences Library, and Sally A. Harvey, AHIP, Merril W. Brown MD Health Sciences Library, Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center, Phoenix, AZ.

119) Managing and Disseminating Historical Content via an Archival Knowledge Management Database Application: Christopher Ryland, Mary Teloh; Jeremy Nordmoe; and Qinghua Kou; Eskind Biomedical Library, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN.

121) Transforming 50 Cubic Feet of Papers, 4,000 Slides, and 250 Videotapes into an Archive Celebrating the Life and Work of John C. McDonald: Dee Jones, AHIP, and Marianne Comegys, Medical Library, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center–Shreveport.

123) Health Sciences Luminaries Poster Series Project: Linda Robinson, Louis Stokes Library, Howard University, Washington, DC.

125) The Retreat at York: Providing a Transformation to Humane Treatment of the Mentally Ill in the 19th Century: Joan M. Stoddart, AHIP, Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library, University of Utah–Salt Lake City.

127) Digital Oral History: Using the Web to Give History New Life: Barbara Halbrook and Ellen Dubinsky, Bernard Becker Medical Library, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO.

129) Development of a Service Philosophy as a Change Management Tool: Natalie K. Reed, AHIP, and Terrance M. Burton, Ebling Library, University of Wisconsin– Madison.

131) Librarians as Key Partners in Campus-wide University-Community Initiatives: Jean P. Shipman, AHIP, VCU Libraries, and Catharine S. Canevari, Tompkins-McCaw Library for the Health Sciences; Jill S. Stover, James Branch Cabell Library; and Rachel A. Gyore, Tompkins-McCaw Library for the Health Sciences; Virginia Commonwealth University–Richmond.

133) 24/7 Operations Across Space and Time, from Planning to Implementation: Janette Shaffer, AHIP, and Jane L. Blumenthal, AHIP, Dahlgren Memorial Library, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, DC, and Vani Murthy, Rockville Campus Library, Montgomery College, Rockville, MD.

135) Work Transformation in the Technical Services and Interlibrary Loan Units of an Academic Medical Library: Mary Blackwelder, AHIP, MCW Libraries, Medical College of Wisconsin–Milwaukee.

137) Changing Space Needs: A First-floor Renovation and Assessing its Impact on Designing the Electronic Library for the 21st Century: Patricia Wilson; Anne Linton, AHIP; and Kathe Obrig; Himmelfarb Health Sciences Library, The George Washington University, Washington, DC.

139) Do … Let Your Children Grow up to be Librarians: Transformations to Leadership: Beverly Murphy, AHIP, and Virginia Carden, AHIP, Duke University Medical Center Library, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC.

141) Library Use of Technology: Wallace McLendon, Health Sciences Library, University of North Carolina– Chapel Hill.

143) Ensuring a Safer Future for Your Library: Taking a Leadership Role in Developing a Disaster Plan for Your Library: Daniel T. Wilson, Susan S. Yowell, and Gretchen N. Arnold, AHIP; Claude Moore Health Sciences Library, University of Virginia–Charlottesville.

145) Job Descriptions in Perpetual Evolution: A Result of “Going Electronic”: Kathe S. Obrig, Anne Linton, AHIP, and Cynthia Swope, Himmelfarb Health Sciences Library, George Washington University, Washington, DC.

147) Our Challenge for the Future: Library Reorganization: Beverly Gresehover, Alexa Mayo, AHIP, and MJ Tooey, AHIP, Health Sciences and Human Services Library, University of Maryland–Baltimore.

149) Return on Investment: Is Virtual Reference Worth the Cost?: Susan C. Whitmore, NIH Library, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD.

151) Transforming Librarianship: Librarians as Consumer Health Video Producers: Heather Brown, Teresa Hartman, Marty Magee, and Cynthia Schmidt, McGoogan Library of Medicine, University of Nebraska Medical Center–Omaha; and Alison Bobal, Valley Library, Oregon State University–Corvallis.

153) Transitioning to the Latest Teaching Technologies: Responding to Faculty Needs: Jeanne M. Le Ber, Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library, University of Utah– Salt Lake City.

155) The Moving of a Medical School After Hurricane Katrina: Lessons Learned: Deborah D. Halsted, HAM-TMC Library, Houston Academy of Medicine-Texas Medical Center, Houston, TX; Philip Walker, Rudolph Matas Medical Library, Tulane University Medical School, New Orleans, LA; Elizabeth K. Eaton, HAM-TMC Library, Houston Academy of Medicine-Texas Medical Center, Houston, TX; and Cathy Montoya, Education Resource Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX.

157) Library Evolution: Moving a Library on a New Campus: Peggy Tahir, manager, Public Services, and Anneliese Taylor, Kalmanovitz Library and Center for Knowledge Management, and Julie Piacentine, Mission Bay Library, University of California–San Francisco.

159) Information Professionals in the Interprofessional Team: Past, Present, and Future: Joanne Rich, Ellen Howard, and Neil Rambo, Health Sciences Library, University of Washington–Seattle.

161) Looking at the Glass Half Full … Rebuilding Ochsner Clinic Foundation Library and Archives in New Orleans, Louisiana: Ethel U. Madden, Ochsner Clinic Foundation Library and Archives, Ochsner Clinic Foundation, New Orleans, LA.

163) Accuracy of References in the Ophthalmic Literature: Gale A. Oren, AHIP, Kellogg Eye Center, University of Michigan–Ann Arbor, and Maureen M. Watson, AHIP, Michigan College of Optometry, Ferris State University, Big Rapids, MI.

165) Identifying Targets for Training Public Health Workers: The Gap Score Adapted to a Needs Assessment Instrument: Marie T. Ascher, AHIP, and Diana J. Cunningham, AHIP, Health Sciences Library, New York Medical College–Valhalla.

167) Pyramid Schemes: The Fusion of Evidence Levels and Information Resources: Karen Odato, Dartmouth Biomedical Libraries, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH; Jan Glover, AHIP, Cushing/Whitney Medical Library, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT; David Izzo, Dartmouth Biomedical Libraries, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH; and Lei Wang, Cushing/Whitney Medical Library, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT.

169) The Impact of Technology on the User Education Process: Jill E. Foust, Health Sciences Library System, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA.

171) Changing Teaching Methodologies to Improve Retention of Information Retrieval Skills: Strategy, Results, and Next Steps: Enid M. Geyer, AHIP, and D. Elizabeth Irish, AHIP, Schaffer Library of Health Sciences, Albany Medical College, Albany, NY.

173) Utilizing an Interdisciplinary Model to Promote Evidence-based Practice in an Acute Care Hospital: Michele Klein-Fedyshin, AHIP, Health Sciences Library, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, and Carol M. Patton, Chatham College, Pittsburgh, PA.

175) Information Management Software for Health Sciences Libraries: Looking Back and Looking Forward: Inhye Kim Son, AHIP, Elaine Attridge, and Patricia Greenberg, Claude Moore Health Sciences Library, University of Virginia–Charlottesville.

177) Google Scholar versus PubMed: A Comparative Study of Search Results: Mary Shultz, AHIP, Library of the Health Sciences-Urbana, University of Illinois-Chicago, Urbana, IL.

179) Transformation of Evidence-based Medicine Search Filters: Enhanced Tools for Librarian Searchers for the Family Physicians Inquiries Network (FPIN): Susan E. Meadows, University of Missouri–Columbia; Karen Knight, Claude Moore Health Sciences Library, University of Virginia–Charlottesville; Joan Nashelsky, Iowa City, IA; Sarah Safranek, and Leilani St. Anna, AHIP, Health Sciences Library, University of Washington– Seattle; Deborah Ward, AHIP, J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library, University of Missouri–Columbia; and FPIN Library Team (Family Physicians Inquiries Network), Family Physicians Inquiries Network, Columbia, MO.

181) Transformation in Open Access Publishing at Two Universities: Virginia M. Carden, AHIP, Medical Center Library, Duke University, Durham, NC; K. T. Vaughan, Bioinformatics and Pharmacy; Stefanie Warlick, and Carol G. Jenkins, AHIP, FMLA, Health Sciences Library, University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill; and Patricia L. Thibodeau, AHIP, Medical Center Library, Duke University, Durham, NC.

183) Evaluate the Evidence: An Innovative Method for Web Page Evaluation: Elizabeth M. La Rue, AHIP, School of Information Sciences, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA.

185) Osteopathic Nomenclature in PubMed: An Analysis: Rebecca A. Chapman, and Faith Ross, AHIP, Midwestern University Library, Midwestern University, Downers Grove, IL.

187) Citation Analysis: Transforming How Institutions View Their Publications: Patricia L. Thibodeau, AHIP, and Virginia R. M. Carden, AHIP, Medical Center Library, Duke University, Durham, NC.

189) The Health Sciences Library as Partner in Case-based Learning Exercises: Sarah K. McCord, and Vicki F. Croft, AHIP, Health Sciences Library, Washington State University–Pullman.

191) A Content Analysis of Questions Generated by Public Health Practitioners: Richard D. Carr, AHIP, and Jonathan D. Eldredge, AHIP, Health Sciences Library and Informatics Center, The University of New Mexico–Albuquerque.

193) Use of a Point-of-care Personal Digital Assistant (PDA) Databases Comparison to Develop a Product Evaluation Workflow: Sarah M. Safranek, Leilani A. St Anna, AHIP, Joanne Rich, and Nanette Welton, Health Sciences Libraries, University of Washington–Seattle.

195) Statistically Speaking, Reference Service On and Off the Desk: Angie Chapple-Sokol, Nancy Bianchi, Frances Delwiche, Jeanene Light, Shiela Phillippe, Donna O'Malley, and Susan Bishop, Dana Medical Library, University of Vermont–Burlington.

197) Transforming Open Access from the Top Down: How Are Funder-mandated Open Access Programs Working?: Pamela C. Sieving, NIH Library, National Institutes of Health Library, Bethesda, MD.

199) Geographic Information Systems (GIS) for Allocation of Health Resources in Developing Countries: Michelle M. Foss, George A. Smathers Libraries; Lenny Rhine, Health Science Center Libraries; and Joe Aufmuth, George A. Smathers Libraries; University of Florida– Gainesville.

203) “How Do I Find …?” Usability of the Health Sciences Center Library's Website: Implications for Redesign: Donghua Tao, and Patrick McCarthy, Health Sciences Center Library, Saint Louis University, St. Louis, MO; Grethen Dalzell, Olin Library, Washington University, St. Louis, MO; and Sandra Borak, and Susan Fowler, Health Sciences Center Library, Saint Louis University, St. Louis, MO.

205) Proxies, Ties, and Health Information-Seeking Realities: Survey Results of an African American Community: Ophelia T. Morey, Health Sciences Library, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY.

207) Throw Away the Clicker, Banish the Hash Marks! How Good Is Your Reference Services Evidence?: Elizabeth D'Antonio-Gan, and Paul Blomquist, Denison Memorial Library, University of Colorado and Health Sciences Center–Denver.

209) Direct-to-Consumer Advertising of Psychiatric Drugs in Popular Magazines: How Are Mental Disorders Portrayed?: Rebecca A. Abromitis, Health Sciences Library System, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA.

Monday, May 22, 2006 (Even Numbers)

2) Transforming Scholarly Communication: DigitalCommons@ the Texas Medical Center, a Multi-institutional Repository in the Making: Leah Krevit and Elizabeth K. Eaton, HAM-TMC Library, Houston Academy of Medicine-Texas Medical Center, Houston, TX.

4) Timeline for Transformation: Moving from a Print-based Library to a Virtual Library: Sharon Easterby-Gannett, AHIP, Christiana Hospital Library; Christine Chastain-Warheit, AHIP, Medical Library; Ellen Justice, Christiana Hospital Library; and Diane Wolf, AHIP, Wilmington Hospital Library; Christiana Care Health System, Newark, DE.

6) Virtual Medical Library: A Start-up Experience: Doris Wisher, AHIP, Jay Sexter Library, Touro University-Nevada, Henderson, NV.

8) Transforming the Index to Chiropractic Literature from a Paper Index to a Freely Available Web-based Index: Phyllis J. Harvey, David D. Palmer Health Sciences Library, Palmer College of Chiropractic, Davenport, IA, and Annette Osenga, Life Chiropractic College-West, Hayward, CA.

10) Integrating and Promoting Medical Podcasts into the Library Collection: Michelle Kraft, AHIP, Medical Library, South Pointe Hospital, Warrensville Heights, OH.

12) HealthyMe@UMB: Promoting Consumer Health Resources to University Staff: MJ Tooey, AHIP, and Stephanie N. Dennis, Health Sciences and Human Services Library, University of Maryland–Baltimore; Marian G. Taliaferro, and Mary H. Littlemeyer, Association of American Medical Colleges, Washington, DC; and Alexa Mayo, AHIP; Wilma A. Bass, Chris Hansen, and Ann Yeager, Health Sciences and Human Services Library, University of Maryland–Baltimore.

14) All Health Is Local: Presenting Go Local Massachusetts: Sally A. Gore, Lamar Soutter Library, University of Massachusetts Medical School–Worcester; Brenda L. Collins, Wilkens Library, Cape Cod Community College, West Barnstable, MA; and Len Levin, AHIP, Lamar Soutter Library, University of Massachusetts Medical School–Worcester.

16) Virtual Cases as a Tool to Promote the Incorporation of Evidence-based Medicine Techniques into Housestaff Training: Nila A. Sathe, Pauline Todd, John Clark, Eskind Biomedical Library; William Gregg, Departments of Biomedical Informatics and Medicine; and Nunzia B. Giuse, AHIP, FMLA, Eskind Biomedical Library; Departments of Biomedical Informatics and Medicine; Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN.

18) www.AZHealthInfo.org: Bridging the Grand Canyon of Local Health Information: Fred L. Heidenreich, AHIP; Patricia A. Auflick; Sandra S. Kramer; Susan J. Trombley; and Stefan Walz; Arizona Health Sciences Library, University of Arizona–Tucson.

20) Quick-and-easy Personalized Orientation Videos: Leilani A. St Anna, AHIP, and Janet G. Schnall, AHIP, Health Sciences Library, University of Washington– Seattle.

22) Electronic Journal Management and Access: Transformation from a Static Website to a Dynamic Link Resolver: Janice Rettino, and Elizabeth Sosnowska, UMDNJ University Libraries, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey–Newark; and Yingting Zhang, UMDNJ Robert Wood Johnson Library of the Health Sciences, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey– New Brunswick.

24) Meeting Challenges in the Evolution of a Geographic Information System Environmental Health Resource: Colette Hochstein and Martha Szczur, National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, MD, and Darren Gemoets, Scientific Communities Practice Area, Aquilent, Laurel, MD.

26) Hurricanes and Other Disasters: Health Information for Response, Reentry, and Recovery: Stephanie Publicker and Stacey J. Arnesen, National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, MD.

28) Transforming Health Services Research: Combining Traditional and Nontraditional Public Health Resources: Andrea Lynch, Cheryl Bartel; Mike Randall; Louise M. Darling Biomedical Library; and Michael Oppenheim, Rosenfeld Management Library; University of California–Los Angeles.

30) Electronic Journal Management Systems: A Comparison: J. Michael Lindsay, Biomedical Library; Kathy P. Wheeler, University of South Alabama Library, Jie Li, AHIP, Biomedical Library; University of South Alabama–Mobile; and Patricia M. Williams, Marnie and John Burke Memorial Library, Spring Hill College, Mobile, AL.

32) A Study of Consumer Health Monographs in Public Libraries Using a Tiered Master Checklist: Jean Williams, McGill University Health Centre, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada.

34) Online Journal Usage Statistics for the University of Florida: What We Continue to Learn: Cecilia Botero, AHIP, Health Science Center Libraries; Steven Carrico, Smathers Library; Lenny Rhine, Health Science Center Libraries; and Michele R. Tennant, AHIP, Health Science Center Libraries and University of Florida Genetics Institute; University of Florida–Gainesville.

36) Library and Curriculum E-Resources: Can a Content Management System Do Both?: Martha Bedard, AHIP, and Gale G. Hannigan, AHIP, Medical Science Library; Tommy Armstrong and Darcy Tammen, College of Medicine; Texas A&M University–College Station.

38) Creating Space for Evolving Needs: How to Dramatically Decrease Your Print Journal Collection with Little Impact on Your Patrons: Gretchen Arnold, AHIP; Jonathan Lord, AHIP; and Daniel T. Wilson; Claude Moore Health Sciences Library, University of Virginia–Charlottesville.

40) Selecting Core Nursing Resources for Point of Care Use: Pauline S. Beam and Suzanne J. Crow, Gustave L. and Janet W. Levy Library, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY.

42) Transforming Borders: A Multi-state, Multi-institutional Approach to Go Local Services: Dana Abbey, Denison Memorial Library, University of Colorado and Health Sciences Center–Denver; Paul Bracke, Arizona Health Sciences Library, University of Arizona–Tucson; Patricia Bradley, Health Sciences Library and Informatics Center, University of New Mexico–Albuquerque; and John Bramble and Claire Hamasu, National Network of Libraries of Medicine MidContinental Region, Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library, University of Utah–Salt Lake City.

44) Managing Digital Multimedia at the Campus Level: The HEAL Local Project: Gail L. Persily, Center for Instructional Technology, Kalmanovitz Library and Center for Knowledge Management, University of California–San Francisco; Sebastian H. J. Uijtdehaage, School of Medicine, University of California–Los Angeles; and Kathleen Cameron, Kalmanovitz Library and Center for Knowledge Management, University of California– San Francisco.

46) Expanding Electronic Journals Through Publisher Site License Access: You Can Do It Too!: James R. Bulger, Library Services, Allina Hospitals and Clinics, Minneapolis, MN.

48) Rhode Island Multi-type Library Outreach for Health Information: MaryAnn Slocomb, AHIP, Peters Health Sciences Library, Rhode Island Hospital/Lifespan– Providence, and Tovah Reis, Sciences Library, Brown University Library, Providence, RI.

50) From Artsy to Zany: Hospital Library Committee Participation: Rebecca A. Birr, AHIP, Health Sciences Library, Maricopa Integrated Health System, Phoenix, AZ; Kathy A. Zeblisky, Medical Library, Phoenix Children's Hospital, Phoenix, AZ; and Kathleen M. Mathieson, Department of Research, Maricopa Integrated Health System, Phoenix, AZ.

52) Using Blog Software to Support Resident Report: Sherry Dodson, Health Sciences Libraries and Information Center; Andrea Ryce, National Network of Libraries of Medicine/Pacific Northwest Region; and Edward Roberts, Information Systems; Health Sciences Libraries and Information Center, University of Washington–Seattle.

54) Dancing Between the Purist and the Practical: Teaching Evidence-based Medicine to Medical Students in the Third-year Family Medicine Clerkship: Leonard Levin, AHIP, and James Comes, Lamar Soutter Library, University of Massachusetts Medical School–Worcester.

56) Effective Methods for Teaching Evidence-based Public Health Nursing Principles: Josephine Dorsch, AHIP, Library of the Health Sciences-Peoria; Roberta Lyons, Regional Nursing Program-Peoria; Sandra De Groote, AHIP, Library of the Health Sciences-Peoria; and Kathleen Baldwin, Regional Nursing Program-Peoria, College of Nursing; University of Illinois–Chicago, Peoria, IL.

58) Book Club Elective for Medical Students: Librarians and Students Share “Book-Talking”: Heather Blunt and Karen Odato, Biomedical Libraries, Dartmouth Medical School, Hanover, NH.

60) Getting HIP: Health Information Partnerships: Siobhan Champ-Blackwell, National Network of Libraries of Medicine MidContinental Region, Health Sciences Library, Creighton University, Omaha, NE, and Marty Magee, McGoogan Library of Medicine, National Network of Libraries of Medicine MidContinental Region, Omaha, NE.

62) Library Outreach: Nobody Is Out-of-reach: Mariana Lapidus, Health Sciences Library, Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences–Boston, and Irena Dryankova-Bond, Blais Family Library, Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences– Worcester.

64) Transforming Obstacles into Opportunities: Expanding the Library's Role in the School of Medicine Curriculum: Megan von Isenburg; Anne Powers, AHIP; and Connie Schardt, AHIP; Information and Education Services, Duke University Medical Center Library, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC.

66) Hit the Road! Developing and Delivering Training on Public Health Information Resources and Mobile Technologies for Rural Practitioners: Lisa Smith and Catherine Rhodes, Gibson D. Lewis Health Science Library, University of North Texas Health Science Center–Fort Worth.

68) Utilization of Clinical Decision Support to Enhance Early Detection of Chemical or Biological Terrorism: Jennifer A. Byrnes and Art Papier, Department of Dermatology, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY.

70) Transforming Pharmacy Student Workshops: Program Overview and Evaluation: Brenda F. Green and Lin Wu, UTHSC Library/Reference Services, University of Tennessee Health Science Center–Memphis.

72) Library Liaisons Enhance Researcher Productivity by Use of a Common Bibliographic Management Software Interface to Deliver Current Awareness Information: Frank Davis, AHIP; Rick Brewer; and Carla Townsend; Medical Center Library, University of Kentucky–Lexington.

74) The Library's Role in Recruiting Volunteer Clinical Faculty: Rita Sieracki; Mary Blackwelder, AHIP, and Barbara Jamieson; MCW Libraries, Medical College of Wisconsin–Milwaukee.

76) Making a PROMIS and Keeping It: Providing Comprehensive Literature Search Services to a National Institutes of Health Roadmap Initiative: Mary L. Klem; Ester M. Saghafi; and Rebecca A. Abromitis; on behalf of the Pittsburgh PROMIS Research Site, Falk Library of the Health Sciences, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA.

78) Delivering Health Information to Native Americans: What, Where, Who, and How: Judith Rieke, Library of the Health Sciences, University of North Dakota–Grand Forks.

80) Librarian-Faculty Partnership at a Statewide Family Medicine Conference: Transformation from Vendor to Instructor: Barbara Jamieson, Rita Sieracki and Mary Blackwelder, AHIP; MCW Libraries, Medical College of Wisconsin–Milwaukee.

82) Assessing and Transforming a Medical Informatics Curriculum for Medical Students: Brenda L. Seago, AHIP, Computer Based Instruction Lab, School of Medicine; Rachel A. Gyore, Tompkins-McCaw Library for the Health Sciences; and Susan Williams, Computer Based Instruction Lab, School of Medicine; Virginia Commonwealth University–Richmond.

84) Faculty Technology Workshops: Transforming Faculty Through Training: Leslie Schick, Library Services, Academic Information Technology and Library, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH.

86) Translating Student Self-assessments into Improved Instruction: Deborah L. Lauseng and Patricia W. Martin; Taubman Medical Library; Alison Grodzinski, Public Health Library and Informatics; and Bradley Sietz, Taubman Medical Library; University of Michigan–Ann Arbor.

88) ICONic Training: Use of a Content Management System to Provide Continual Reference Student Education: Kathryn J. Skhal and Catherine Thureson, Hardin Library for the Health Sciences, University of Iowa–Iowa City.

90) Innovative Access to Consumer Health Information: Partnerships Lead the Way: Sally M. Patrick; John C. Bramble; and Valeri Craigle; Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library, University of Utah–Salt Lake City.

92) Outcomes and Measurable Indicators Drive the Logic Model Approach for a Liaison Program: Neville D. Prendergast and Elizabeth Kelly, Bernard Becker Medical Library, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO.

94) Blog This! A Proactive Method to Increase Library Outreach: Lisa Huang, Learning Resource Center, Collin County Community College District, McKinney, TX.

96) Teaching Public Health Students Skills for Evidence-based Practice: Gale G. Hannigan, AHIP, Medical Science Library, Texas A&M University–College Station.

98) Tipping the Scales: The Role of Information Services in an Obesity Prevention Coalition Initiative: Terry Henner, Information and Education Services, Savitt Medical Library, University of Nevada School of Medicine– Reno.

100) Teaching Medical School Electives: Beyond Clinical Resources: Doreen R. Bradley; Theresa S. Arndt; Patricia W. Martin; and Gurpreet K. Rana; Taubman Medical Library, University of Michigan–Ann Arbor.

102) Support for the Systematic Review in Evidence-based Practice: A Simplified Model for a Multi-campus Research Team: Sheila Hofstetter, AHIP, Noble Science and Engineering Library, Arizona State University–Tempe; Leslee B. Shell, ASUW Library, Arizona State University at West Campus–Phoenix; Danielle M. Carlock, Polytechnic Campus Library, Arizona State University at Polytechnic Campus–Mesa; and Jenna Amani, Arizona State University at the West Campus–Phoenix.

104) Library Contributions to Cultural Competency: Greater than the Sum of the Parts: Theresa S. Arndt, Taubman Medical Library; Alison Grodzinski and Helen Look, Public Health Library and Informatics; Anna Ercoli Schnitzer, Taubman Medical Library; and Patricia F. Anderson, Dentistry Library, University of Michigan–Ann Arbor.

106) Expediting Evidence-based Practice by Building Clinical Partnerships: The Role of Central Arizona Biomedical Libraries in the Arizona Consortium for the Advancement of Evidence-based Practice: Lora Robbins, AHIP, Merril W. Brown Health Sciences Library, Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center, Phoenix, AZ; Shelia Hofstetter, AHIP, Noble Science and Engineering Library, Arizona State University–Tempe; Darlene Perry, AHIP, Medical Library, Mayo Clinic-Scottsdale, Scottsdale, AZ; and Michael Kronenfeld, AHIP, Learning Resource Center, AT Still University for the Health Sciences, Mesa, AZ.

108) Creating a Scientific Editing Service: Rhona S. Kelley, AHIP, head, Reference and Education; Fran E. Kovach, AHIP; and Carol Thornton, AHIP; Medical Library; and Connie Poole, AHIP, Information Resources; Southern Illinois University School of Medicine– Springfield.

110) Out of the Box: Bioethics Facilitation and a Nontraditional Approach to Campus Outreach and Professional Development: Elizabeth D'Antonio-Gan, Denison Memorial Library, University of Colorado and Health Sciences Center–Denver.

112) Expert Searchers' Contributions to Evidence-based Health Policy Making: Min-Lin E. Fang; Gail Persily; Keir Reavie; and David Owen; Kalmanovitz Library and Center for Knowledge Management, University of California–San Francisco; and Penny Coppernoll-Blach, Biomedical Library, University of California– San Diego, La Jolla, CA.

114) Collaborating with Faculty to Support Research in Medical Education and the Implementation of Innovative Medical School Curriculum: Josephine Tan and Keir T. Reavie, Kalmanovitz Library and Center for Knowledge Management, University of California–San Francisco.

116) Evidence-based Surgery Training: Collaborating to Fulfill Competencies: Linda C. O'Dwyer, Galter Health Sciences Library, and John Coyle, Department of Surgery, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL.

118) A Stroke in Time: Senior Citizen Access to Trusted Stroke Information: Valerie A. Gross, AHIP, Community Health Resource Library, and Britain G. Roth, AHIP, Academic Information, Geisinger Health System, Danville, PA; JoAnn Babish, AHIP, Health Sciences Library, and Vicki Frisino, HealthInfo Library, Moses Taylor Hospital, Scranton, PA; and Linda Famiglio, Medical Education, Pennsylvania Rural Stroke Initiative–Danville.

120) Developing a Tutorial for Consumers on Evaluating Online Health Information: Stephanie N. Dennis, Health Sciences and Human Services Library, University of Maryland–Baltimore, and Naomi Miller, Consumer Health Information, and Paula Kitendaugh, Health Information Products Unit, National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, MD.

122) A New Role for Hospital-based Librarians in Academic Medical Centers: Providing Consumer Health Information Curricular-based Practica: Patricia A. Hammond, AHIP; Jean P. Shipman, AHIP; and Catharine S. Canevari; VCU Libraries, Virginia Commonwealth University–Richmond.

124) Using Controlled Vocabulary in Adverse Event Reporting to Improve Patient Safety in Clinical Trials: Margaret M. Gorman, Arizona Cancer Center, University of Arizona–Tucson.

126) Informed Caring: A Project to Promote Evidence-based Practice in Rural Health Care: Cynthia M. Reinl, AHIP, Rose Library, Bellin Health, Green Bay, WI; Mark Scully, Bay Area Medical Center, Marinette, WI; and Suzanne Matthew, and Diana H. Robertson, Northern Wisconsin Area Health Education Center– Wausau.

128) Promoting Equity in Health Information: A Community Outreach Collaboration: Patricia Wilson and Richard Billingsley, Himmelfarb Health Sciences Library; Karyn Pomerantz, Department of Prevention and Community Health; Betsy Gardiner, Himmelfarb Health Sciences Library; and Eduardo Pezo, School of Public Health and Health Services; The George Washington University, Washington, DC.

130) Creating and Implementing Evidence-based Tracheotomy Care Guidelines: Transforming Best Intentions into Best Practices: Pamela C. Sieving, NIH Library, and Susan F. Rudy, NIH Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD.

132) Taking It to the Streets: Making Outpatients Safer with Practice-based Learning and Improvement Morning Report: Gail Y. Hendler, AHIP, Library Services, Health Sciences Library, Lenox Hill Hospital, New York, NY.

134) Creating an Environment to Improve Patient and Consumer Health Care: Outreach to Public Libraries, Senior Centers, and Clinics: Naomi C. Broering, AHIP, FMLA; Stacy L. Gomes; and Gregory A. Chauncey, Medical Library, Pacific College of Oriental Medicine, San Diego, CA; and Douglas Spence, Taylor Pacific Beach San Diego Public Library, San Diego, CA.

136) The Transplant Candidate: Who Will Fail and Who Will Succeed? The Librarian's Continuous Improvement: Hattie H. Vines, AHIP, Information and Education Services, and Ellen M. Stone, Duke Transplant Center, Duke University, Durham, NC.

138) Walking and Talking through History: Putting to Use the Archived Materials of a Specialty Nursing Association: Mark Vrabel, AHIP, and Christine Maloney, Library, Oncology Nursing Society, Pittsburgh, PA.

140) From Seed to Maturation: The Development of Consumer Health Outreach by the National Network of Libraries of Medicine: Terri Ottosen, AHIP, and Becky Hebert, National Network of Libraries of Medicine Southeastern Atlantic Region, University of Maryland–Baltimore.

142) Harold S. Diehl: Pioneer in Randomized Controlled Trials: Karla J. Block, AHIP; Lisa McGuire; and Katherine V. Chew; Bio-Medical Library, University of Minnesota–Minneapolis.

144) Bloodletting: From Medical Doctrine to Quackery in Europe and the New World: Cynthia Kahn, AHIP, Medical Library, Legacy Health System, Portland, OR, and Gail Kouame, National Network of Libraries of Medicine Pacific Northwest Region, University of Washington–Seattle.

146) Implementing and Managing a Digital Imaging Service for Archival Reference and Research: Lisa A. Mix, Kalmanovitz Library and Center for Knowledge Management, University of California–San Francisco.

148) Historical Exhibitions at the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC): Cynthia R. Kahn, AHIP, Medical Library, Legacy Health System, Portland, OR, and Marian Taliaferro, Association of American Medical Colleges, Washington, DC.

150) First Things First: Using Active Records Management to Enhance Archival Acquisitions: Kathryn H. Baker, Countway Library of Medicine, Harvard University, Boston, MA.

152) Libraries and Disaster Preparedness and Recovery: Making Your Library a Safer Place to Be During a Natural Disaster and Making It Easier for Your Library to Recover from a Natural Disaster: Darcel A. Bryant, AHIP, Louis Stokes Health Sciences Library, Howard University, Washington, DC.

154) Balancing the Budget and Positioning Your Library for Financial Success: Aphrodite M. Bodycomb, and MJ Tooey, AHIP, Health Sciences and Human Services Library, University of Maryland–Baltimore.

156) Building Successful International Library Partnerships: Jie Li, AHIP, Biomedical Library, University of South Alabama–Mobile, and Wendy (Gang) Wu, Shiffman Medical Library, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI.

158) Transforming Conference Planning with Project Management Tools: Colleen M. Kenefick, AHIP, Center for Healthcare Informatics Education; Susan E. Werner and Mary C. Chimato; Health Sciences Center Library, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY.

160) Library Disaster Preparedness: Barbara Armstrong, AHIP, and Jennifer Tom, Biomedical Library, University of California–San Diego.

162) Transforming a Regional Medical Library Program: Claire Hamasu, National Network of Libraries of Medicine MidContinental Region, Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library, University of Utah–Salt Lake City; Elizabeth Kelly, Bernard Becker Medical Library, Washington University, St Louis, MO; and Wayne J. Peay, FMLA, Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library, University of Utah–Salt Lake City.

164) Transforming to Environmentally Responsible Conferences: Planning a Green Meeting: Joan M. Gregory, AHIP, Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library, University of Utah–Salt Lake City; Erica Lake, Urban Central Regional Medical Library, Intermountain Health Care, Salt Lake City, UT; and Jeanne M. Le Ber, Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library, University of Utah–Salt Lake City.

166) Running Out of Library Space: Sharing Remote Storage to Increase Cost Savings and Conserve Space: Kathe S. Obrig, Himmelfarb Health Sciences Library, George Washington University, Washington, DC; Vani K. Murthy, Montgomery College Libraries, Montgomery College Libraries, Rockville, MD; Tracie E. Frederick, Dahlgren Memorial Library, Georgetown University, Washington, DC; and George W. Paul and Leah C. Pellegrino, Himmelfarb Health Sciences Library, George Washington University, Washington, DC.

168) Transforming Physicians into Informationists: A Dual-degree Pathway to Developing Medical Information Specialists: Patricia L. Thibodeau, AHIP, Medical Center Library, Duke University, Durham, NC; Peggy Schaeffer, School of Information and Library Science, University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill; and Robert James, Medical Center Library, Duke University, Durham, NC.

170) “Oh, No! They Want to Have the Conference Here!”: The Similarities and Differences of Hosting MLA and Chapter Annual Conferences: Janna C. Lawrence, AHIP, and Jonquil D. Feldman, AHIP, Briscoe Library, University of Texas Health Science Center–San Antonio.

172) Bidirectional Transformation: New and Experienced Librarians Coming Together to Effect Change in the Profession: Becky Hebert, National Network of Libraries of Medicine Southeastern Atlantic Region, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD; Brittany Horn, Library, Eastern Virginia Medical School–Norfolk; and Jane Blumenthal, AHIP, Dahlgren Memorial Library, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, DC.

174) A Catalyst for Technological Transformation: The Library's Role in Instructional Technology: James Brucker; Stephanie Kerns; Linda Walton; and James Shedlock, AHIP; Galter Health Sciences Library, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL.

176) Supporting Bioinformatics Research at Health Sciences Libraries: Inhye Kim Son, AHIP, Claude Moore Health Sciences Library, University of Virginia–Charlottesville.

178) The Changing Face of Work: Flextime and Flexplace: Valerie St. Pierre Gordon, AHIP, and Susan C. Corbett, AHIP, Lister Hill Library of the Health Sciences, University of Alabama–Birmingham.

180) The Purrfect Transformation: Ana G. Ugaz; Taryn Resnick; and Nancy G. Burford; Medical Sciences Library, Texas A&M University–College Station.

182) Placing Limits on Assistance: Virtual Reference Services in Academic Health Sciences Libraries: Jodi L. Philbrick and Ana D. Cleveland, AHIP, Health Informatics Program, School of Library and Information Sciences, University of North Texas–Denton.

184) Has the Internet Improved Medical Student Information Literacy Skills? A Retrospective Case Study: 1995– 2005: Daniel G. Kipnis and Anthony J. Frisby, Scott Memorial Library, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA.

186) Implementing a Networked Scanner/Photocopier in a Hospital Setting: Does It Improve Workflow and Service Delivery?: Susan Cordaro; Sally A. Harvey, AHIP, and Lora Robbins, AHIP; Merril W. Brown Health Sciences Library, Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center, Phoenix, AZ.

188) Transforming Data into Knowledge for Decision Making: Putting MS Access and Excel to Work for You: Joan Marcotte Gregory, AHIP; Alice I. Weber; Allyson Mower; and Julie Quilter, Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library, University of Utah–Salt Lake City.

190) Evidence-based Nursing Terminology: Does It Differ from Evidence-based Medicine?: Patricia McNary, Health Sciences Library, Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences–Boston, and Mary Krieger, Health Sciences Center Library, Saint Louis University, St. Louis, MO.

192) Assessing the Value of EMBASE: Cindy L. Sheffield, Welch Medical Library, and Karen A. Robinson, Department of Internal Medicine, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD.

194) Planning Efforts to Conduct a Randomized Clinical Trial to Evaluate the Impact of an Information Prescription Service: Laurie W. Davidson, Welch Medical Library, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD; Susan E. Rohner, Onondaga Free Library, Syracuse, NY; and Holly A. Willis, McGlannan Health Sciences Library, Mercy Medical Center, Baltimore, MD.

196) Modeling the Phoenix: From Disasters Past Toward a Future Prepared: Kathel Dunn, Ehrman Medical Library, New York University School of Medicine–New York; Marcus A. Banks, AHIP, Nathan Cummings Library, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY; Patricia Tomasulo, AHIP, and Richard Faraino, AHIP, Ehrman Medical Library; and Lewis Nelson, Department of Emergency Medicine; New York University School of Medicine–New York.

198) Do We Really Need All of these Computers? Moving Beyond Observational Analysis for Gathering Statistics of Public Computer Usage: Michelle Frisque; Jeremy Prevost; and Kurt Munson; Galter Health Sciences Library, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL.

200) Continental Bias in North American and European Dental Research Journals: Ron Leehacharoenkul, School of Dentistry, University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill; Stephen C. Bayne, School of Dentistry, University of Michigan–Ann Arbor; James D. Bader, School of Dentistry, and Kathleen A. McGraw, Health Sciences Library, University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill.

202) An Examination of Joint Electronic Reference Service: Has the Time Come for a Health Sciences Virtual Reference Service Consortium?: Barbara A. Wright, AHIP; Robert E. Johnson; Irene Lubker; Aparna Sharma; Catharine S. Canevari; Tompkins-McCaw Library for the Health Sciences; Marilyn J. Scott, James Branch Cabell Library; Virginia Commonwealth University–Richmond; and Megan S. Nunemaker, NRAO Library, National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA.

204) New Visions: Charting the Future with Web Design: Katherine Prentice and Mary Moore, Briscoe Library, University of Texas Health Science Center–San Antonio, and Randolph Bias, School of Information, University of Texas–Austin.

206) Evidence Matters (EM): The North American Experience: A New Research Transfer Technology: Ofer A. Avital, Evidence Matters, Montreal, QC Canada.

208) Scaling Evidence-based Services Through Integration with Informatics Tools: Rebecca N. Jerome, Department of Biomedical Informatics and Eskind Biomedical Library; Molly Cahall; Shannon Potter; Pauline Todd; and Annette M. Williams; Eskind Biomedical Library; and Nunzia B. Giuse, AHIP, FMLA, Eskind Biomedical Library and Departments of Biomedical Informatics and Medicine; Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN.

OTHER MEETINGS AND EVENTS

Pre-meeting activities

The MLA Board of Directors held a day-long meeting on Friday, May 19. The MLA Credentialing Committee met Friday evening. On Saturday, May 20, these MLA groups met: Professional Recruitment and Retention Committee (ad hoc), Nominating Committee, Books Panel, Task Force on MLA's Research Policy Statement, 2007 National Program Committee. In addition, chapter chairs, Chapter Council, section chairs, Section Council, Section Council representatives, and section program planners (MLA '07) held meetings and there was a new leaders' tea.

Sunday, May 21, 2006

Early Sunday morning the International Cooperation Section had a business meeting, the Outreach SIG met and these informal meetings were conducted: Medline Plus Go Local, Central Group on Educational Affairs/ Midwest Chapter and Ovid Customer Forum. At midday, the Research Section had a judges meeting and the Task Force on Scholarly Publishing met. MLA sections that met in the afternoon included Collection Development (executive committee), Consumer and Patient Health Information (board meeting), Corporate Information Services, Hospital Libraries, Medical Library Education, Nursing and Allied Health Resources (executive board), Public Health/Health Administration, Public Services, Veterinary Medical Libraries (executive committee). Informal meetings were held at the same time by the PubMed Linkout Users and the following special interest groups (SIGs): Clinical Librarians and Evidence-based Health Care, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgendered Health Sciences Librarians, Molecular Biology and Genomics, OCLC, and Primary Care. The Task Force on MLA's Educational Policy Statement and the Fellows of MLA also met. In the evening, the Pharmacy and Drug Information Section held a reception.

Monday, May 22, 2006

On Monday morning, the following MLA units met: 2008 National Program Committee, Awards Committee, Chapter Treasurers, Governmental Relations Committee, JMLA Editorial Board, MLANET Editorial Board, Section Continuing Education Chairs, and Southern Chapter Executive Board. At the same time, these sections held meetings: Cancer Librarians, CABI/Veterinary Medical Library, Educational Media and Technologies, Federal Libraries, Hospital Libraries (committee meetings), and Medical Informatics and these SIGs met: African American Medical Librarians Alliance, New Members, and Osteopathic Libraries. In the afternoon, nine sections met: Collection Development, Consumer and Patient Health Information, Dental, Health Association Libraries, Leadership and Management (roundtable), Nursing and Allied Health Resources, Public Services (roundtables), Research, Technical Services, and Veterinary Medical Libraries. SIGs meeting at this time were: Assessment and Benchmarking, Department of the Army Medical Command Libraries, and Rehabilitation Hospital. The DOCLINE Users Group also met. During the early evening, the Medical Informatics Section had a reception and the Research Section, Medical Library Group of Southern California and Arizona, and FPIN Librarian Community held meetings. These SIGs also met: Complementary and Alternative Medicine, Liaison Librarians, Pediatric Libraries, and Vision Science.

Tuesday, May 23, 2006

Early Tuesday morning, several MLA units met: Benchmarking Network Editorial Board, Bylaws Committee, Chapter Continuing Education Chairs, Donald A. B. Lindberg Research Fellowship Jury, Membership Committee, and Southern Chapter and Mid-Atlantic Chapter 2006 Joint Planning Committee. These sections also had meetings: Hospital Libraries (executive board), Leadership and Management (executive board), Pharmacy and Drug Information, and Technical Services. The Library Marketing SIG also met. At midday, Section Treasurers, EFTS Users' Group, Middle Atlantic Region RML Discussion, and these SIGs met: Libraries in Curriculum, Mental Health, and OCLC. In the afternoon, the Chiropractic Libraries, History of the Health Sciences, and Leadership and Management Sections had meetings. The Department of Veteran Affairs Librarians and Relevant Issues SIGs also met, as did the Health Literacy Planning Group and the QuickDOC Users Group.

Wednesday, May 24, 2006

In the early morning, the Continuing Education, Grants and Scholarships, Joseph Leiter NLM/MLA Lectureship and Oral History Committees met, as did Section Council, Section Program Planners (MLA '07), the Research Section (informal meeting) and the Department of Veterans Affairs Librarians SIG. After the close of the meeting, the MLA Board of Directors, NLM/AAHSL Leadership Fellows Program Leadership Institute, and the Task Force on MLA's Research Policy Statement met, and the Continuing Education Committee held another meeting.

FOCUS GROUPS AND OPEN FORUMS

Three focus groups and three open forums were held concurrently on Tuesday, May 23, from 3:30 p.m.–4:30 p.m. The focus groups, which were by invitation only, all covered MLANET redesign. The open forums were:

Information specialist in context (ISIC) task force

This open forum session, led by Diane Wolf of the ISIC Task Force and the consultant team from Eskind Biomedical Library at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, included an overview of key project results by the consultant team. The summary of current perceptions of the ISIC role in a variety of health care scenarios was based on data drawn from focus groups of librarians, surveys of key stakeholders, and interviews with practicing ISICs. The group also discussed preliminary training and assessment frameworks and potential funding and communication strategies. The session concluded with a discussion of current and future MLA actions to foster the development of this advanced role for librarians, and a brief question and answer session with open forum attendees. The full project report is available in the members-only section of MLANET at http://www.mlanet.org/members/mla_news/2006/apr_06/isic.html.

Developing middle managers: what we learned and where we are going

The Leadership and Management Section's (LMS) Task Force on Professional Development for Current and Aspiring Middle Managers (PDCAMM) presented its findings and recommendations drawn from an in-depth analysis of the data from its survey to explore the needs for professional development in library management. That survey was conducted in 2005 and had over 400 respondents who were middle managers. The survey results are available on the LMS Website at http://www.lmlanet.org/PDCAMMTaskForce.html. The survey results and focused interviews revealed that middle managers need additional training. They want classes focused on practical skills, e.g., budgeting and personnel management. There was also interest in an in-depth, longitudinal program combining classes, mentoring, portfolios, and career guidance. Time and funding are issues, but are not insurmountable. The most important skill identified was communication. After the task force recommendations were outlined, comments and discussion with the audience concluded the session.

Education and research: visions for tomorrow

Rick Forsman, AHIP, FMLA, chair of the task force to review MLA's education policy statements, used the first half of the open forum to get input on the draft of the statement, Platform for Lifelong Learning and Professional Success, available on MLANET at http://www.mlanet.org/pdf/ce/mlplatprofsuccess26.pdf. He was especially interested in comments on the questions: Do the introductory sections provide a clear and accurate picture of the context in which health information professionals work and the need for lifelong learning? Do the core areas of knowledge and skills appropriately reflect necessary competencies for health information professionals in the current environment and anticipated changes in the foreseeable future? What additional competencies do you believe should be added? Do you have any comments on the desirability of the draft recommendations, additional ones to suggest, or general comments to offer? In addition to the discussion at the meeting, the task force encourages member input to ude.cshcu@namsrof.kcir.

In the second half, Suzanne Grefsheim, chair of the Research Policy Task Force, and other committee members gave an update on the work done to date, including interviews with fifty-two key informants, a definition of research and work on a research skill set. Additional member input can be sent to Grefsheim at vog.hin@d8gs.

SUNRISE SEMINARS

Vendors again held Sunrise Seminars to provide information and introduce new products and services. On Sunday, May 21, 2006, the American Psychological Association, EBSCO Publishing, Ovid, ProQuest, and Thomson Scientific gave seminars. On Monday, May 22, Doody's, CINAHL, National Library of Medicine, MD Consult, STAT!Ref and Rittenhouse presented seminars, and on Tuesday, May 23, there were seminars by EMBASE, McGraw-Hill, EBSCO, and the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP). EOS and RefWorks held Lunch and Learn sessions that day.

TECHNOLOGY SHOWCASES

Twelve technology showcases were held during MLA '06. These were:

  • Community Outreach Resources from EBSCO, May 21, 12:00 p.m.–2:30 p.m.
  • New McGraw-Hill Digital Products, May 21, 1:00 p.m.–1:30 p.m.
  • CyberTools for Libraries: Virtually Yours, May 21, 2:00 p.m.–2:30 p.m.
  • Redesigned EBSCONET Subscription Management System, May 21, 3:00 p.m.–3:30 p.m.
  • CINAHL Announcements and Enhancements, May 21, 2:00 p.m.–2:30 p.m.
  • APA Discusses PsycARTICLES' Historical Content, May 22, 10:00 a.m.–10:30 a.m.
  • SydneyPlus International: The Single Point for Medical Information, May 22, 2:00 p.m.–2:30 p.m.
  • EBSCO: Electronic Resource Management/ “E“clectic or “E“centric, May 22, 3:00 p.m.–3:30 p.m.
  • Learning from Our Users: How Ovid's Next Generation Design Embraces New Technologies and Reflects Changing User Behaviors, May 22, 4:00 p.m.–4:30 p.m.
  • Electronic Resource Management–TDNet, May 23, 10:00 a.m.–10:30 a.m.
  • DynaMed–EBSCO's Point-of-Care Solution, May 23, 11:30 a.m.–12:00 p.m.
  • Eduserv Athens–Best Practices in E-Resources Access Management, May 23, 1:30 p.m.–2:00 p.m.

NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE UPDATE

Donald A. B. Lindberg, director of the National Library of Medicine (NLM), began the NLM Update, which took place Tuesday, May 23, from 10:30 a.m.– 11:30 a.m. He gave updates on new and retiring personnel, the budget, and the new building, and elaborated on the success of ClinicalTrials.gov, preservation activities, the NIH roadmap, PubChem, Whole Genome Association projects, including work on genes and the environment, Genetic Association Information Network (GAIN), the Framingham Genetic Study, and the long-range plan. Angela Ruffin, head of the National Network Office, followed with highlights from the National Network of Libraries of Medicine and Becky Lyons, acting director for Library Operations, gave an A-Z tour of highlights of NLM library operations.

LEGISLATIVE UPDATE

The Governmental Relations Committee (GRC) sponsored an update on Tuesday, May 23, from 11:30 a.m.– 12:30 p.m. Dale Dirks, president, Health and Medicine Council of Washington (DC) and MLA's legislature representative in Washington, gave a Capitol Hill overview and an update on health and education funding for fiscal year 2007. Pat Thibodeau spoke on public access to government information and gave an update on the Section 108 Study Group, which is reviewing the need for new exemptions to the copyright law for digital use of copyrighted material. Marianne Comegys, chair of the GRC, then gave a review of MLA action in response to the Environmental Protection Agency budget cuts.

OTHER SPECIAL EVENTS AND RECEPTIONS

Saturday, May 20: Welcome Reception and Opening of Hall of Exhibits, 5:30 p.m.–7:30 p.m.

Sunday, May 21:

  • Majors 18th Annual Walk for Fun, 6:30 a.m.–7:30 a.m.
  • New Members and First-time Attendees Breakfast, 7:00 a.m.–8:15 a.m.
  • Chapter Council Presents Sharing Roundtables, noon–2:00 p.m.
  • International Visitors Reception, 6:00 p.m.–7:00 p.m.
  • Library School Reunion, 6:00 p.m.–7:00 p.m.
  • Poisoned Pen Mystery Bookstore Reception, 7:00 p.m.–9:00 p.m.
  • Friends of the National Library of Medicine Reception, 7:00 p.m.–9:30 p.m.

Monday, May 22: Academy of Health Information Professionals Question-and-Answer Session, 2:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Tuesday, May 23:

  • Networking Lunch with Sections, 12:30 p.m.–2:00 p.m.
  • Fun and Friendship: The Final Transformation

CONTINUING EDUCATION COURSES AND SYMPOSIUM

The 2005/06 Continuing Education Committee offered the following courses on May 19, 20, and 24:

  • CE 100, Measuring Your Impact: Using Evaluation to Demonstrate Value
  • CE 101, The PhD Experience: Graduate School in the Basic Biomedical Sciences
  • CE 102, The Art of Building and Sustaining Community Partnerships
  • CE 103, Joint Commission Standards: Management of Information and Beyond
  • CE 200, Creating a Business Plan
  • CE 201, Introduction to Financial Management for Health Sciences Librarians
  • CE 202, Planning and Managing Consumer Health Libraries
  • CE 203, Essentials of Hospital Librarianship
  • CE 204, Ethnic Awareness and Health Information Resources: Chicken Soup and Crawdad Gumbo
  • CE 206, Face-to-Face: Strategies for Effective Consumer Health Communication
  • CE 300, Expert Searching for Nursing and Allied Health
  • CE 301, The Changing Nature of Providing Reference/ Information Services
  • CE 303, Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) for Searchers
  • CE 304, Number, Number, Who's Got the Number? Or Who's Counting: Health Statistics Sources
  • CE 305, Consumer Health Libraries: Managing for Your Customer Base and Environment
  • CE 400, First Do No Harm: Basic Strategies for Administering Archival Materials in Health Sciences Libraries
  • CE 401, Unified Medical Language (UMLS) Basics
  • CE 402, Reference Collection Development and Management
  • CE 500, Emerging Mobile Technologies
  • CE 502, Technology Planning for Health Sciences Librarians
  • CE 503, How to Use Really Simple Syndication (RSS) to Know More and Do Less
  • CE 600, Introducing Interactivity into Your Web Design
  • CE 601, Rapid Training Design: A Short Course for Librarians
  • CE 602, The Librarian's Role in Information Mastery: Assessing the Usefulness of Clinical Information Resources
  • CE 603, Teaching About Evidence-based Practice
  • CE 604, Evidence-based Medicine: Introduction to Study Design and Critical Appraisal
  • CE 700, Qualitative Evidence: Practical Methods to Gather and Analyze Information Behavior and Attitude Data
  • CE 701, Research for Beginners: Seven Steps to Success
  • CE 702, Understanding Health Care Literature: A Primer for Working with Evidence-based Health Care Principles
  • CE 703, Introduction to Medical/Health Care Informatics for Librarians
  • CE 704, Doing It Right: Supporting Systematic Reviews with Expert Searching and Project Management Skills
  • CE 800, Symposium: Patient Safety: A Proactive Approach for Information Professionals. Sponsored by MLA's Consumer and Patient Health Information and Hospital Libraries Sections, it was held on Saturday, May 20 from 9:00 a.m.–3:00 p.m. (Financial contributions from CINHAL Information Systems, Lippincott Williams and Wilkins, National Library of Medicine, National Patient Safety Foundation, Thomson Gale)
  • CE 801, Symposium: Serving Diverse Users: Cultural Competencies for Health Sciences Librarians. Sponsored by the National Library of Medicine and the Mid-Atlantic Chapter of MLA, it took place on Wednesday, May 24, 2006 from 1:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

The twenty-eight pre-meeting courses, one pre-meeting symposium, three post-meeting courses and one post-meeting symposium had a total attendance of 707.

RESOURCES AND SERVICES

MLA offered its usual array of services for meeting attendees. A Hospitality Center provided maps and salient information about Phoenix. The Information Desk, part of the MLA Registration Center, was the place to leave messages for MLA staff or the Board of Directors, and it also served as the Lost and Found center. A Message Center allowed colleagues to connect through notes, and the Internet Café was available Saturday, May 20 through Wednesday, May 24. The Job Placement Center was opened a total of 33 hours, as was the Member Resource Room, which provided copy machines, computers, and printers for association business. The Speaker Ready room was open from 7:00 a.m. through 5:00 p.m., Sunday through Wednesday. The Daily Transformer was published on Sunday through Tuesday, May 21–May 23. This official newsletter of MLA '06 provided program updates and corrections, room changes, meeting announcements, and interesting facts about Phoenix. MLA's public relations consultant, Public Communications Inc. (PCI), conducted two seminars on “How to make others care about your library,” Sunday, May 21, 2:00 p.m.–2:30 p.m. and Tuesday, May 23, 10:30 a.m.–11:00 a.m. at the MLA Public Relations Swap and Shop booth.

Footnotes

See end of article for authors' affiliations.

REFERENCES

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  • Affymetrix. Genechip essentials: how Affymetrix GeneChip® DNA microarrays work: the basic principle. [Web document]. Affymetrix. [cited 22 May 2006]. <http://www.affymetrix.com/corporate/media/genechip_essentials/gene_expression/The_Basic_Principle.affx>.
  • Pattison JS, Folk LC, Madsen RW, Childs TE, and Booth FW. Transcriptional profiling identifies extensive down regulation of extracellular matrix gene expression in sarcopenic rat soleus muscle. Physiol Genomics. 2003.  Sep 29; 15(1):34–43. [PubMed]
  • Pattison JS, Folk LC, Madsen RW, Childs TE, Spangenburg EE, and Booth FW. Expression profiling identifies dysregulation of myosin heavy chains IIb and IIx during limb immobilization in the soleus muscles of old rats. J Physiol. 2003.  Dec 1; 553(Pt 2):357–68. [PMC free article] [PubMed]
  • Pattison JS, Folk LC, Madsen RW, and Booth FW. Selected Contribution: Identification of differentially expressed genes between young and old rat soleus muscle during recovery from immobilization-induced atrophy. J Appl Physiol. 2003.  Nov; 95(5):2171–9. [PubMed]
  • PubMed help. [cited 26 Jul 2006]. <http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/bv.fcgi?rid=helppubmed.chapter.pubmedhelp>.
  • Patrick T, Folk L. How is gene function information cited in published reports of microarray experiments? Poster presentation at the Medical Library Association annual meeting 2005.
  • Hull D, Wolstencroft K, Stevens R, Goble C, Pocock MR, Li P, and Oinn T. Taverna: a tool for building and running workflows of services. Nucleic Acids Res. 2006.  Jul 1; 34(Web Server issue):W729–W732. [PMC free article] [PubMed]

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