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Logo of archdischfnArchives of Disease in Childhood - Fetal & NeonatalVisit this articleSubmit a manuscriptReceive email alertsContact usBMJ
Arch Dis Child Fetal Neonatal Ed. Jul 1998; 79(1): F4–F11.
PMCID: PMC1720827

Randomised trial of parental support for families with very preterm children

Abstract

AIM—To test the effectiveness of a home based developmental education programme in very preterm children.
METHODS—A randomised controlled trial was conducted of developmental or social support intervention, started at discharge for up to 2 years, in 309 consecutive survivors of 32 weeks gestation or less, born to mothers resident in greater Bristol between December 1990 and July 1993. Home visits were made by research nurses trained in either Portage (a developmental education programme) or in non-directional counselling (parent adviser scheme). Interventions were also provided to appropriate primary care and community support for disability. Griffiths Mental Development Scales were used to assess outcome at 2years.
RESULTS—Mean (SEM) Griffiths quotients (GQ) were: Portage 96.8 (1.6); parent adviser 95.9 (1.6); preterm control 92.9 (2.0). Despite randomisation, social variables significantly confounded these results. Using linear regression analysis, intervention was associated with improved scores: Portage: + 4.3 GQ points (95% CI 1.6 to 7.0); parent adviser: +3.4 GQ points (1.4 to 6.1). The effect of Portage was greatest in those children with birthweights <1250 g (+5.3 GQ points (0.2 to 10.4) and in those with an abnormal neonatal cerebral ultrasound scan (+7.3 GQ points (1.6 to 13.0).
CONCLUSION—Primary analysis showed no developmental benefit from long term family support after preterm birth. Secondary analysis controlling for the presence of adverse social markers showed similar small advantage for both intervention groups. In the smallest infants and those with brain injuries, a structured developmental programme may offer advantage over social support intervention.

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Selected References

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