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Biophys J. Aug 2001; 81(2): 685–696.
PMCID: PMC1301545

Modeling pO(2) distributions in the bone marrow hematopoietic compartment. II. Modified Kroghian models.

Abstract

Hematopoietic cells of various lineages are organized in distinct cellular architectures in the bone marrow hematopoietic compartment (BMHC). The homogeneous Kroghian model, which deals only with a single cell type, may not be sufficient to accurately describe oxygen transfer in the BMHC. Thus, for cellular architectures of physiological significance, more complex biophysical-transport models were considered and compared against simulations using the homogeneous Kroghian model. The effects of the heterogeneity of model parameters on the oxygen tension (pO(2)) distribution were examined using the multilayer Kroghian model. We have also developed two-dimensional Kroghian models to simulate several cellular architectures in which a cell cluster (erythroid cluster) or an individual cell (megakaryocyte or adipocyte) is located in the BMHC predominantly occupied by mature granulocytes. pO(2) distributions in colony-type cellular arrangements (erythroblastic islets, granulopoietic loci, and lymphocytic nodules) in the BMHC were also evaluated by modifying the multilayer Kroghian model. The simulated results indicate that most hematopoietic progenitors experience low pO(2) values, which agrees with the finding that low pO(2) promotes the expansion of various hematopoietic progenitors. These results suggest that the most primitive stem cells, which are located even further away from BM sinuses, are likely located in a very low pO(2) environment.

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Selected References

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